Arxiu del dimarts , 6/11/2018

Questioning the very nature of your existence

dimarts , 6/11/2018

 Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality

Anil Seth  |  TED2017

Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience — and not just any conscious experience, your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it.
How does this happen?
According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we’re all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it “reality.”

 

 

Just over a year ago, for the third time in my life, I ceased to exist. I was having a small operation, and my brain was filling with anesthetic. I remember a sense of detachment and falling apart and a coldness. And then I was back, drowsy and disoriented, but definitely there. Now, when you wake from a deep sleep, you might feel confused about the time or anxious about oversleeping, but there’s always a basic sense of time having passed, of a continuity between then and now. Coming round from anesthesia is very different. I could have been under for five minutes, five hours, five years or even 50 years. I simply wasn’t there. It was total oblivion. Anesthesia — it’s a modern kind of magic. It turns people into objects, and then, we hope, back again into people. And in this process is one of the greatest remaining mysteries in science and philosophy.
How does consciousness happen? Somehow, within each of our brains, the combined activity of many billions of neurons, each one a tiny biological machine, is generating a conscious experience. And not just any conscious experience — your conscious experience right here and right now. How does this happen?

01:22

Answering this question is so important because consciousness for each of us is all there is. Without it there’s no world, there’s no self, there’s nothing at all. And when we suffer, we suffer consciouslywhether it’s through mental illness or pain. And if we can experience joy and suffering, what about other animals? Might they be conscious, too? Do they also have a sense of self? And as computers get faster and smarter, maybe there will come a point, maybe not too far away, when my iPhone develops a sense of its own existence.

01:54
I actually think the prospects for a conscious AI are pretty remote. And I think this because my research is telling me that consciousness has less to do with pure intelligence and more to do with our nature as living and breathing organisms. Consciousness and intelligence are very different things.You don’t have to be smart to suffer, but you probably do have to be alive.

02:17
In the story I’m going to tell you, our conscious experiences of the world around us, and of ourselves within it, are kinds of controlled hallucinations that happen with, through and because of our living bodies.

02:29
Now, you might have heard that we know nothing about how the brain and body give rise to consciousness. Some people even say it’s beyond the reach of science altogether. But in fact, the last 25 years have seen an explosion of scientific work in this area. If you come to my lab at the University of Sussex, you’ll find scientists from all different disciplines and sometimes even philosophers. All of us together trying to understand how consciousness happens and what happens when it goes wrong.And the strategy is very simple. I’d like you to think about consciousness in the way that we’ve come to think about life. At one time, people thought the property of being alive could not be explained by physics and chemistry — that life had to be more than just mechanism. But people no longer think that.As biologists got on with the job of explaining the properties of living systems in terms of physics and chemistry — things like metabolism, reproduction, homeostasis — the basic mystery of what life is started to fade away, and people didn’t propose any more magical solutions, like a force of life or an élan vital. So as with life, so with consciousness. Once we start explaining its properties in terms of things happening inside brains and bodies, the apparently insoluble mystery of what consciousness isshould start to fade away. At least that’s the plan.

03:51
So let’s get started. What are the properties of consciousness? What should a science of consciousness try to explain? Well, for today I’d just like to think of consciousness in two different ways. There are experiences of the world around us, full of sights, sounds and smells, there’s multisensory, panoramic, 3D, fully immersive inner movie. And then there’s conscious self. The specific experience of being you or being me. The lead character in this inner movie, and probably the aspect of consciousness we all cling to most tightly. Let’s start with experiences of the world around us, and with the important idea of the brain as a prediction engine.

04:28
Imagine being a brain. You’re locked inside a bony skull, trying to figure what’s out there in the world.There’s no lights inside the skull. There’s no sound either. All you’ve got to go on is streams of electrical impulses which are only indirectly related to things in the world, whatever they may be. So perception — figuring out what’s there — has to be a process of informed guesswork in which the brain combines these sensory signals with its prior expectations or beliefs about the way the world is to form its best guess of what caused those signals. The brain doesn’t hear sound or see light. What we perceive is its best guess of what’s out there in the world.

05:09
Let me give you a couple of examples of all this. You might have seen this illusion before, but I’d like you to think about it in a new way. If you look at those two patches, A and B, they should look to you to be very different shades of gray, right? But they are in fact exactly the same shade. And I can illustrate this. If I put up a second version of the image here and join the two patches with a gray-colored bar,you can see there’s no difference. It’s exactly the same shade of gray. And if you still don’t believe me,I’ll bring the bar across and join them up. It’s a single colored block of gray, there’s no difference at all.This isn’t any kind of magic trick. It’s the same shade of gray, but take it away again, and it looks different. So what’s happening here is that the brain is using its prior expectations built deeply into the circuits of the visual cortex that a cast shadow dims the appearance of a surface, so that we see B as lighter than it really is.

06:05
Here’s one more example, which shows just how quickly the brain can use new predictions to change what we consciously experience. Have a listen to this.

06:15
(Distorted voice)

06:19
Sounded strange, right? Have a listen again and see if you can get anything.

06:23
(Distorted voice)

Still strange. Now listen to this.
06:30
(Recording) Anil Seth: I think Brexit is a really terrible idea.

(Laughter)

Which I do.

So you heard some words there, right? Now listen to the first sound again. I’m just going to replay it.

06:41
(Distorted voice)

Yeah? So you can now hear words there. Once more for luck.

(Distorted voice)

06:53
OK, so what’s going on here? The remarkable thing is the sensory information coming into the brainhasn’t changed at all. All that’s changed is your brain’s best guess of the causes of that sensory information. And that changes what you consciously hear. All this puts the brain basis of perception in a bit of a different light. Instead of perception depending largely on signals coming into the brain from the outside world, it depends as much, if not more, on perceptual predictions flowing in the opposite direction. We don’t just passively perceive the world, we actively generate it. The world we experience comes as much, if not more, from the inside out as from the outside in.

07:35
Let me give you one more example of perception as this active, constructive process. Here we’ve combined immersive virtual reality with image processing to simulate the effects of overly strong perceptual predictions on experience. In this panoramic video, we’ve transformed the world — which is in this case Sussex campus — into a psychedelic playground. We’ve processed the footage using an algorithm based on Google’s Deep Dream to simulate the effects of overly strong perceptual predictions. In this case, to see dogs. And you can see this is a very strange thing. When perceptual predictions are too strong, as they are here, the result looks very much like the kinds of hallucinationspeople might report in altered states, or perhaps even in psychosis.

08:21
Now, think about this for a minute. If hallucination is a kind of uncontrolled perception, then perception right here and right now is also a kind of hallucination, but a controlled hallucination in which the brain’s predictions are being reined in by sensory information from the world. In fact, we’re all hallucinating all the time, including right now. It’s just that when we agree about our hallucinations, we call that reality.

08:49

Hace poco más de un año, por tercera vez en mi vida, dejé de existir. Tuve una pequeña operación y mi cerebro estaba lleno de anestesia. Recuerdo una sensación de desapego, desmoronamiento y una frialdad. Y entonces volví, somnoliento y desorientado, pero definitivamente volví. Cuando uno se despierta de un sueño profundo, puede que se sienta confundido por la hora o afligido por dormir mucho. Pero siempre hay una sensación básica del tiempo que ha pasado, de una continuidad entre entonces y ahora. La vuelta de la anestesia es muy diferente. Podría haber estado así cinco minutos, cinco horas, cinco años o incluso 50 años. Simplemente no estaba. Fue un olvido total. La anestesia es un tipo moderno de magia. Convierte a la gente en objetos, y luego, le devuelve de nuevo la vida a la gente. Y en este proceso es uno de los mayores misterios en la ciencia y la filosofía.
¿Cómo se da la conciencia? De alguna manera, en cada uno de nuestros cerebros, la actividad combinada de miles de millones de neuronas, cada una, una minúscula máquina biológica, genera una experiencia consciente. Y no solo cualquier experiencia consciente, sino su experiencia consciente aquí y ahora mismo. ¿Cómo sucede esto?

01:22

Responder a esta pregunta es muy importante porque la conciencia para cada uno de nosotros es todo lo que existe. Sin ella no hay mundo, no hay yo, no hay nada en absoluto. Y cuando sufrimos, sufrimos conscientemente. Ya sea por una enfermedad mental o por dolor. Y si podemos experimentar alegría y sufrimiento, ¿qué pasa con otros animales? ¿Son conscientes también?¿También tienen un sentido de sí mismos? Y conforme las computadoras son cada vez más rápidas e inteligentes, quizá llegará un momento, quizá muy lejano, en el que mi iPhone desarrolle un sentido de su propia existencia.

01:54
En realidad creo que la perspectiva de una IA consciente es bastante remota. Y lo creo porque mi investigación sugiere que la conciencia tiene menos que ver con la inteligencia y más con nuestra naturaleza como organismo vivo que respira. La conciencia y la inteligencia son cosas muy diferentes.No tienes que ser inteligente para sufrir, pero probablemente tienes que estar vivo.

02:17
En la historia que voy a contar, nuestra experiencia consciente del mundo que nos rodea, y de nosotros mismos en ella, son tipos de alucinaciones controladas que suceden con, a través y por medio de nuestros cuerpos vivos.

02:29
Puede que hayan escuchado que no sabemos nada sobre cómo el cerebro y el cuerpo dan lugar a la conciencia. Algunas personas incluso dicen que está más allá del alcance de la ciencia. Pero, de hecho, en los últimos 25 años ha habido una explosión de trabajo científico en esta área. Si vienen a mi laboratorio en la Universidad de Sussex, verán científicos de disciplinas diferentes incluso hasta filósofos. Juntos tratamos de entender cómo ocurre la conciencia y lo que sucede cuando sale mal. Y la estrategia es muy simple. Me gustaría que pensaran en la conciencia de igual forma en que hemos llegado a pensar en la vida. En un tiempo, la gente pensaba que la propiedad de estar vivo no podría explicarse por la física y la química. Que la vida tenía que ser algo más que un simple mecanismo.Pero la gente ya no piensa eso. Conforme los biólogos siguieron con el trabajo de explicar las propiedades de los sistemas vivos en términos de física y química, como metabolismo, reproducción, homeostasis… el misterio elemental de qué es la vida empezó a desvanecerse, y la gente ya no propuso más soluciones mágicas, como una fuerza de vida o una élan vital. Así como con la vida, así con la conciencia. Una vez que comencemos explicando sus propiedades en términos de cosas que suceden dentro de cerebros y cuerpos, el misterio aparentemente irresoluble de lo que es la conciencia debe comenzar a desvelarse. Al menos ese es el plan.

03:51
Entonces empecemos. ¿Cuáles son las propiedades de la conciencia? ¿Qué debería intentar explicar una ciencia de la conciencia? Hoy solo me gustaría pensar en la conciencia de dos formas diferentes.Hay experiencias del mundo que nos rodea, lleno de vistas, sonidos y aromas, existe una panorámica multisensorial, 3D, una película interior inmersiva. Y luego está el yo consciente. La experiencia específica de ser tú o ser yo. El protagonista de esta película interior, y quizá el aspecto de la conciencia al que todos se aferran más estrechamente. Comencemos con las experiencias del mundo que nos rodea, y con la idea importante del cerebro como motor de predicción.

04:28
Imaginen ser un cerebro. Estás encerrado dentro de un cráneo óseo, tratando de imaginar lo que hay en el mundo. No hay luces dentro del cráneo. Tampoco hay sonido. Solo debes seguir las corrientes de impulsos eléctricos indirectamente relacionadas con las cosas del mundo, cualesquiera que sean.Así que la percepción, adivinando qué es, tiene que ser un proceso de conjeturas informadas donde el cerebro combina estas señales sensoriales con sus expectativas o creencias anteriores sobre cómo es el mundo para formar su mejor conjetura de lo que causó esas señales. El cerebro no oye ni ve, ni ve la luz. Lo que percibimos es su mejor suposición de lo que hay en el mundo.

05:09
Les daré unos ejemplos de todo esto. Puede que hayan visto esta ilusión óptica antes, pero me gustaría que pensaran en ella de una manera nueva. Si observamos esas dos casillas, A y B, verán que parecen tener tonos muy diferentes de gris, ¿verdad? Pero de hecho son exactamente la misma sombra. Y puedo ilustrar esto. Si pongo una segunda versión de la imagen aquí y uno ambas casillas con una barra de color gris, verán que no hay diferencia. Es exactamente el mismo tono de gris. Y si todavía no me creen, traeré la barra y los uniré. Es un bloque de color gris, no hay diferencia en absoluto. Esto no es ningún truco de magia. Es el mismo tono de gris, pero al quitarlo de nuevo, se ve diferente. Entonces, ¿qué está pasando aquí? El cerebro está usando sus expectativas anterioresarraigadas profundamente en los circuitos de la corteza visual de que una sombra fundida oscurece la apariencia de una superficie. Así vemos a B como más claro de lo que realmente es.

06:05
Aquí hay un ejemplo más, que muestra la rapidez con la que el cerebro puede usar nuevas predicciones para cambiar lo que conscientemente experimentamos. Escuchen esto.

06:15
(Voz distorsionada)

06:19
Sonaba extraño, ¿verdad? Escúchenlo otra vez e intenten entender alguna cosa.

06:23
(Voz distorsionada)

Todavía extraño. Ahora escuchen esto.
06:30
(Grabación) Anil Seth: Creo que Brexit es una idea terrible.

(Risas)

Cosa que pienso.

Así que oyeron palabras, ¿verdad? Ahora escuchen de nuevo el primer sonido. Solo voy a reproducirlo.

06:41
(Voz distorsionada)

¿Sí? ¿Pueden ahora escuchar palabras? Una vez más por si trae suerte.

(Voz distorsionada)

06:53
Bien, ¿qué está pasando aquí? Lo notable es que la información sensorial que entra en el cerebro no haya cambiado en absoluto. Todo lo que ha cambiado es la mejor conjetura de su cerebro de las causas de esa información sensorial. Y eso cambia lo que conscientemente escuchamos. Todo esto pone la base cerebral de la percepción en una perspectiva algo diferente. En vez de que la percepción dependa de las señales que llegan al cerebro desde el mundo exterior, depende tanto, si no más, de predicciones perceptivas que fluyen en la dirección opuesta. No solo percibimos pasivamente el mundo, lo generamos activamente. El mundo que experimentamos viene tanto, si no más, de adentro hacia afuera que de fuera hacia adentro.

07:35

Les daré un ejemplo más de percepción como proceso activo y constructivo. Aquí hemos combinados la realidad virtual inmersiva con el procesamiento de imágenes para simular los efectos de predicciones perceptivas demasiado fuertes en la experiencia. En este video panorámico, hemos transformado el mundo, que es en este caso el campus de Sussex, en un patio psicodélico. Hemos procesado las imágenes con un algoritmo basado en Google Deep Dream para simular los efectos de predicciones perceptivas demasiado fuertes. En este caso, para ver perros. Y pueden ver que se trata de algo muy extraño. Cuando las predicciones perceptivas son demasiado fuertes, como aparecen aquí, el resultado se parece mucho al tipo de alucinaciones que la gente podría informar en estados alterados, o tal vez incluso en psicosis.

08:21
Ahora, piensen en esto un minuto. Si la alucinación es una especie de percepción no controlada,entonces la percepción aquí y ahora es también una especie de alucinación, pero una alucinación controlada donde las predicciones del cerebro reinan sobre la información sensorial del mundo. De hecho, todos estamos alucinando todo el tiempo, incluyendo ahora mismo. Es solo que cuando estamos de acuerdo sobre nuestras alucinaciones, lo llamamos realidad.

08:49