Arxiu del mes: desembre 2018

A New Theory of Time – Lee Smolin

dilluns, 31/12/2018

By Lee Smolin

“If you’re looking for a bracing substitute imaginative and prescient of physics outfitted from the floor up, Smolin’s Time Reborn will take you to the mountaintop.” — NPR

What’s time?

It’s this kind of query we hardly ask since it turns out so noticeable. And but, to a physicist, time is just a human build and an phantasm. in case you may perhaps one way or the other get outdoors the universe and become aware of it from there, you are going to see that each second has continuously existed and continuously will. Lee Smolin disagrees, and in Time Reborn he lays out the case why.

advancements in physics and cosmology aspect towards the truth of time and the openness of the long run. Smolin’s groundbreaking conception postulates that actual legislation can evolve through the years and the long run isn’t but made up our minds. Newton’s primary legislation would possibly not stay so fundamental. Time Reborn serves as a well-liked primer and research of time, either what it really is and the way the real nature of it affects our world.

“He demanding situations not just Einstein’s relativity, but additionally the very suggestion of common legislation as immutable truths.” — Economist

“One of the basic books of the twenty-first century . . . Smolin presents a much-needed dose of readability approximately time, with implications that pass some distance past physics to economics, politics, and private philosophy.” — Jaron Lanier, writer of You are usually not a Gadget.


Resetting the Clocks

By Alan Lightman, May 3, 2013

“… … …

Twentieth-century physics has brought us two kinds of strangeness: strange things we more or less understand, and strange things we do not understand. The first category includes relativity and quantum mechanics. Relativity reveals that time is not absolute. Clocks in relative motion to each other tick at different rates. We don’t notice relativity in daily life because the relative speed must be close to the speed of light before the effects are significant. Quantum mechanics presents a probabilistic picture of reality; subatomic particles act as if they occupy many places at once, and their locations can be described only in terms of probabilities. Although we can make accurate predictions about the average behavior of a large number of subatomic particles, we cannot predict the behavior of a single subatomic particle, or even a single atom. We don’t feel quantum mechanics because its effects are significant only in the tiny realm of the atom.

The category of strange things we do not understand includes the origin of the universe and the nature of the “dark energy” that pervades the cosmos. Over the last 40 years, physicists have realized that various universal parameters, like the mass of the electron (a type of subatomic particle) and the strength of the nuclear force (the force that holds the subatomic particles together within the centers of atoms), appear to be precisely calibrated. That is, if these parameters were a little larger or a little smaller than they actually are, the complex molecules needed for life could never have formed. Presumably, the values of these parameters were set at the origin of the universe. Fifteen years ago, astronomers discovered a previously unknown and still unexplained cosmic energy that fills the universe and acts as an antigravity-like force, pushing the galaxies apart. The density of this dark energy also appears to be extraordinarily fine-tuned. A little smaller or a little larger, and the life-giving stars would never have formed.

The haunting question is why these fundamental parameters lie in the narrow range required by life. What determined their values? One explanation offered by physicists, called the “anthropic principle,” is that there are, in fact, a great many universes, with widely varying properties and parameters. In most other universes, the strength of the nuclear force, the density of the dark energy and so on are much different than in ours. Those universes would be lifeless and barren. By definition, we live in one of the universes with parameters that allow life, because otherwise we would not be here to ask the question.

 CreditIllustration by Chad Hagen

Smolin has his own theory to explain why we live in a life-supporting universe, which he calls “cosmological natural selection.” He proposes that new universes are spawned at the centers of black holes. As in biological natural selection, those universes with the right parameters for producing new black holes have descendants; those that do not disappear. What’s more, it turns out that some of the conditions needed to form black holes, such as the right parameters to form stars, are the same as those needed for life.

Despite its appeal, there are several problems with Smolin’s theory. First, there is no evidence that new universes are created at the centers of black holes. Second, even if such evidence existed, why would the parameters of a universe so created bear any resemblance to the parameters of its parent universe, as required by the theory? If the parameters differ by more than a little, the new universe would not have “survivable” characteristics.

Cosmological natural selection does have one feature that relates to Smolin’s dissatisfaction with the relativity of time. The succession of parent and descendant universes necessarily unfolds in time, and Smolin believes that this is “real” time (as opposed to what he calls the “unreal” and “inessential” conceptions of time in traditional physics).

One of Smolin’s most astonishing ideas is something he calls the “principle of precedence,” that repeated measurements of a particular phenomenon yield the same outcomes not because the phenomenon is subject to a law of nature but simply because the phenomenon has occurred in the past. “Such a principle,” Smolin writes, “would explain all the instances in which determinism by laws work but without forbidding new measurements to yield new outcomes, not predictable from knowledge of the past.” In Smolin’s view such unconstrained outcomes are necessary for “real” time.

Putting aside the sensational ideas proposed in “Time Reborn,” it is a triumph of modern physics that we are even asking such questions as what determined the initial conditions of the universe. In previous centuries, these conditions were either accepted as given or attributed to the handiwork of the gods. A triumph, and also possibly a defeat. For if we must appeal to the existence of other universes — unknown and unknowable — to explain our universe, then science has progressed into a cul-de-sac with no scientific escape.

 

Constantes inconstantes

dilluns, 31/12/2018

El tiempo y el espacio no son constantes como nos pensamos; la distancia entre dos puntos varía según la velocidad a la que nos movamos, y lo mismo pasa con la velocidad a la que pasa el tiempo, no es siempre la misma.

El “pasar” del tiempo

diumenge, 30/12/2018

L’illusione del tempo

diumenge, 30/12/2018

Ockels: “We all are astronauts”

dissabte, 29/12/2018

Protecting our earth has become a bigger necessity and space travel has given us a better perspective: we are where we are: on a great planet, one which we cannot live without. Ockels put it very nicely: We all are astronauts of spaceship earth. He considers our will as key, that the belief in humanity will give us the will and this new religion will help us to express it. He would like to see this religion taking form: in symbols, rituals and art which expresses our faith in humanity. Especially the youth should be targeted, they are after all the future. They should be able to enjoy nature and earth. Their idols could be their role models. Festivals and artists could deliver the message and convey the right words which can touch the hearts of the youth. Ockels ended his open letter by saying that we all should help each other to shape this religion and to express our belief in a sustainable humanity.

Ockels said he had a great life, now it is up to us to ponder and ‘listen’ to what he had to say and live up to his dreams. On his tombstone he wanted people to read “My time is standing still.” Let’s all stand still in our thoughts for our visionary astronaut.

 

 

The Ockels commandments -of the Happy Energy believe in Humanity-:

1. Humanity is inseparable
2. Humanity’s goal is to survive
3. Humanity needs the Earth and Nature
4. Our goal is to support Humanity and thus the Earth and Nature
5. We need to respect anyone who exercises that goal
6. Everybody is connected with anybody via Humanity
7. Everyone is connected with Nature and the Earth
8. We are all Astronauts of Space Ship Earth
9. Those who disrespect others, will disrespect Humanity
10. Humanity, Nature and the Earth are inseparable

The Illusion of Time

dissabte, 29/12/2018

Professor Wubbo J. Ockels, sliced through the atmosphere of self-congratulation to give a mind-bending talk, based on his experiences in space. He started by berating the audience for pretending to understand the universe and mysteriously declaring:

 “I know what it is that you don’t know yet and it will change your life”. What we didn’t know, and were told, was that time is a creation of life, since it’s the only way our brains can make sense of gravity. This can be pithily put in the very post-Cartesian phrase: “I live, therefore time passes”. Such a view isn’t a new notion philosophically (Heidegger suggested being and time determine each other reciprocally), nor physiologically (which acknowledges time is a construct of the central nervous system) but it was not treated with seriousness in physics.”

Dr Wubbo Johannes Ockels (28 March 1946 – 18 May 2014) was a Dutch physicist and an astronaut of the European Space Agency (ESA).

 


Fair use Notice: This website distributes this material without profit. This Information is for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Wubbo J. Ockels -Time & Brains-

divendres, 28/12/2018

Professor Dr. Wubbo J. Ockels tries to stimulate a mentality change among citizens. He explains how:

“Time is created by human beings, as a way our brains can make sense of gravity.

The speed of light is constant, because it is made by us: it’s the clock by which we have calibrated our existence.

Based on this premise, Ockels proposes a new way to explore life in our galaxy.

With a different gravity the aliens have a different time and we don’t see each other. Earth is unique since most of the universe is space.

 Our measurement of the speed of light is based on our time. It may be different in alien time.

 

Ondas gravitacionales, 2015

dijous, 27/12/2018

 

Hace un poco más de cien años, en 1915, Einstein publicó su teoría de la relatividad general, que es un nombre medio raro, pero esta es una teoría que explica la gravedad. Dice que las masas — toda la materia, los planetas — se atraen no porque los atraiga una fuerza instantánea, como decía Newton, sino porque toda la materia — todos nosotros, todos los planetas — arrugan la tela flexible del espacio-tiempo.

00:45

El espacio-tiempo es esto en lo que vivimos y que nos conecta a todos. Es como cuando nosotros nos acostamos en un colchón y deformamos el colchón. Y las masas se mueven no — de nuevo, no por las leyes de Newton, sino porque ven esa curvatura del espacio-tiempo y van siguiendo las curvitas, así como cuando nuestro compañero de cama se nos arrima debido a la curvatura del colchón.

(Risas)

Un año después, en 1916, Einstein derivó de su teoría que existían las ondas gravitacionales. Esas eran producidas cuando las masas se mueven como, por ejemplo, cuando dos estrellas están girando una alrededor de la otra, y producen pliegues en el espacio-tiempo que se llevan energía del sistema y se van acercando las estrellas. Sin embargo, él también calculó que estos efectos eran tan tan tan pequeños que nunca se iban a poder medir. Les voy a contar como, con el trabajo de cientos de científicos trabajando desde muchos países por muchas décadas, hace muy poquito tiempo en el 2015, descubrimos esas ondas gravitacionales por primera vez.

02:15

Esta es una historia bastante larga. Empezó hace 1.300 millones de años. Hace mucho mucho tiempo, en una galaxia muy muy lejana —

(Risas)

02:32

había dos agujeros negros que estaban girando uno alrededor del otro, “bailando un tango”, me gusta decir, que empezó lento, pero a medida que emitían ondas gravitacionales, se iban acercando, se iban acelerando, hasta que, cuando estaban girando casi a la velocidad de la luz, se fusionaron en un solo agujero negro que tenía 60 veces la masa del sol pero compactada en 360 kilómetros. Eso es el tamaño del estado de Louisiana, donde yo vivo. Este efecto increíble produjo ondas gravitacionales que llevaron el mensaje de este abrazo cósmico al resto del universo.

03:21

Nos tomó mucho tiempo descubrir el efecto de estas ondas gravitacionales, porque lo que hacen, la manera en que las medimos, es buscando efectos en distancias. Nosotros queremos medir longitudes, distancias. Cuando estas ondas gravitacionales pasaron por la Tierra, que pasaron en el 2015, produjeron cambios en todas las distancias las distancias entre ustedes, las distancias entre ustedes y yo, nuestras alturas — todos nosotros nos estiramos y nos achicamos un poquitito. La predicción es que el efecto es proporcional a la distancia. Pero es pequeñísimo: aun para distancias mucho más grandes que mi poca altura, el efecto es infinitesimal. Por ejemplo, la distancia entre la Tierra y el Sol cambió por un diámetro atómico. ¿Cómo se puede medir eso? ¿Cómo pudimos medir eso?

04:28

Hace unos cincuenta años, había unos físicos visionarios en Caltech y MIT, Kip Thorne, Ron Drever, Rai Weiss, que pensaban que se podían medir precisamente distancias usando láseres que midieran distancias entre espejos que estaban a kilómetros de distancia. Tomó muchos años y mucho trabajo y muchos científicos desarrollar la tecnología, desarrollar las ideas, y 20 años después, hace casi 30 años, más de 20, se empezaron a construir dos detectores de ondas gravitacionales, dos interferómetros, en los Estados Unidos, cada uno con cuatro kilómetros de largo. Uno [está] en el estado de Louisiana, en Livingston, Louisiana, en medio de un bosque precioso; el otro, en Hanford, Washington, el estado de Washington, en medio del desierto.

05:29

En estos interferómetros, tenemos láseres que viajan desde el centro, cuatro kilómetros en vacío, se reflejan en espejos y vuelven, y estamos midiendo la diferencia de distancia entre este brazo y este brazo. Y estos detectores son muy muy muy sensibles, son los instrumentos más precisos del mundo. ¿Por qué hicimos dos? Porque las señales que queremos medir vienen del espacio son las que queremos medir, pero los espejos se están moviendo todo el tiempo, entonces para distinguir efectos ondas gravitacionales, que son efectos astrofísicos y deben aparecer en los dos detectores, podemos distinguirlos de los efectos locales, que aparecen distintos, en uno o en el otro.

06:19

En septiembre del 2015, estábamos terminando de instalar la segunda generación de tecnología en estos detectores, y todavía no estábamos a la sensibilidad óptima que queremos — todavía no estamos allí, incluso dos años después, pero ya queríamos tomar datos. No pensábamos que íbamos a ver nada, pero estábamos preparando para empezar a tomar datos por unos meses. Y la naturaleza nos sorprendió.

06:49

El 14 de septiembre del 2015, vimos en los dos detectores una onda gravitacional. En los dos detectores vimos una señal con unos ciclos que crecían en amplitud de frecuencia después decaían, y eran los mismos en los dos detectores. Eran ondas gravitacionales. Y no solo eso, sino que, descodificando esta forma de onda, podíamos deducir que venían de agujeros negros fusionándose en uno solo, hace más de mil millones de años. Y esto fue —

(Aplausos)

 

Esto fue fantástico.

07:39

Al principio, no lo podíamos creer. Esto no se suponía que tenía que pasar hasta más adelante. Fue una sorpresa para todos. Nos tomó meses convencernos de que esto era cierto, porque no queríamos dar lugar a ningún error. Pero era cierto, y para despejar toda duda de que realmente los detectores podían medir estas cosas, en diciembre del mismo año, medimos otra onda gravitacional más chiquita que la primera. La primera onda gravitacional produjo una diferencia de distancia de cuatro milésimas de protón. sobre cuatro kilómetros. Sí, la segunda detección fue más chica pero todavía muy convincente para nuestros estándares A pesar de que estas son ondas de espacio-tiempo, no ondas de sonido, a nosotros nos gusta ponerlas en parlantes y escucharlas. Le decimos a esto “la música del universo”. Aquí les quiero hacer escuchar las primeras dos notas de esta música.

(Silbido)

(Silbido)

 

La segunda, la más cortita fue la última fracción de segundo de estos dos agujeros negros, que en esa fracción de segundo emitieron un montón de energía — tanta energía — como la de tres soles convirtiéndose en energía siguiendo esa fórmula famosa, E = mc2. ¿Se acuerdan? Esta música, en realidad, a nosotros nos encanta tanto, bailamos con esto, que se la voy a hacer escuchar de nuevo.

(Silbido)

(Silbido)

¡Es la música del universo!

(Aplausos)

09:35

Frecuentemente la gente me pregunta ahora: ¿Para qué sirven las ondas gravitacionales? Y ahora que ya las descubrieron, ¿qué queda por hacer? ¿Para qué sirven las ondas gravitacionales?

09:50

Cuando a Borges le preguntaron: “¿Para qué sirve la poesía?” Él a su vez preguntó: “¿Para qué sirve el amanecer? ¿Para qué sirven las caricias? ¿Para qué sirve el olor a café?” Y él se respondió: “La poesía sirve para el placer, para la emoción, para vivir”.

10:11

Y entender el universo, esta curiosidad humana por saber cómo funciona todo es parecido. La humanidad, desde tiempo inmemorial, y todos nosotros, todos ustedes de chicos, cuando se mira el cielo por primera vez y se ven estrellas, uno se pregunta: “¿Qué son las estrellas?” Esa curiosidad es lo que nos hace humanos. Y eso es lo que hacemos con la ciencia.

10:39

A nosotros nos gusta decir que las ondas gravitacionales ya están sirviendo, porque estamos abriendo una nueva manera de explorar el universo. Hasta ahora, pudimos ver la luz de las estrellas a través de las ondas electromagnéticas. Ahora podemos escuchar el sonido del universo aun de cosas que no emiten luz, como ondas gravitacionales.

(Aplausos)

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

Pero ¿solo para eso servirán? ¿No se deriva ninguna tecnología de ondas gravitacionales?

11:21

A lo mejor, sí. Pero va probablemente a tomar mucho tiempo. Hemos desarrollado tecnología para detectarlas, pero las ondas mismas, a lo mejor se descubra de acá a cien años que sirven para algo. Pero toma mucho tiempo derivar tecnología de la ciencia y no es por eso que lo hacemos. Toda tecnología se deriva de la ciencia, pero la ciencia la hacemos para el placer. ¿Qué nos queda por hacer? Muchísimo. Muchísimo. Esto es recién el comienzo.

11:54

A medida que hacemos los detectores más sensibles — y nos queda bastante por hacer — no solo vamos a ver más agujeros negros, vamos a poder hacer un catálogo para saber cuántos hay, dónde están cuán grandes son, sino que también, vamos a ver otros objetos. Vamos a ver la fusión de estrellas de neutrones, que se convierten en un agujero negro. Vamos a ver nacer a un agujero negro. Vamos a poder ver estrellas rotantes en nuestra galaxia produciendo ondas sinusoidales. Vamos a poder ver explosiones de supernovas en nuestra galaxia. Es todo un espectro de nuevas fuentes que vamos a estar viendo.

12:35

Nos gusta decir que hemos agregado un nuevo sentido al cuerpo humano: ahora, además de ver, podemos escuchar. Esto es una revolución en la astronomía, así como cuando Galileo inventó el telescopio, o como cuando al cine mudo se le agregó el sonido. Esto es apenas el comienzo. Nos gusta pensar que el camino de la ciencia es muy largo — muy divertido, pero muy largo — y esta gran comunidad internacional de científicos trabajando en equipo desde muchos países, todos juntos, estamos ayudando a construir este camino, poniendo luces, a veces encontrando desvíos, y construyendo, a lo mejor, una autopista al universo.

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

A little over 100 years ago, in 1915, Einstein published his theory of general relativity, which is sort of a strange name, but it’s a theory that explains gravity. It states that mass — all matter, the planets — attracts mass, not because of an instantaneous force, as Newton claimed, but because all matter — all of us, all the planets — wrinkles the flexible fabric of space-time.

00:45

Space-time is this thing in which we live and that connects us all. It’s like when we lie down on a mattress and distort its contour. The masses move — again, not according to Newton’s laws, but because they see this space-time curvature and follow the little curves, just like when our bedmate nestles up to us because of the mattress curvature.

(Laughter)

A year later, in 1916, Einstein derived from his theory that gravitational waves existed, and that these waves were produced when masses move, like, for example, when two stars revolve around one another and create folds in space-time which carry energy from the system, and the stars move toward each other. However, he also estimated that these effects were so minute, that it would never be possible to measure them. I’m going to tell you the story of how, with the work of hundreds of scientists working in many countries over the course of many decades, just recently, in 2015, we discovered those gravitational waves for the first time.

02:15

It’s a rather long story. It started 1.3 billion years ago. A long, long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away —

(Laughter)

02:32

two black holes were revolving around one another — “dancing the tango,” I like to say. It started slowly, but as they emitted gravitational waves, they grew closer together, accelerating in speed, until, when they were revolving at almost the speed of light, they fused into a single black hole that had 60 times the mass of the Sun, but compressed into the space of 360 kilometers. That’s the size of the state of Louisiana, where I live. This incredible effect produced gravitational waves that carried the news of this cosmic hug to the rest of the universe.

03:21

It took us a long time to figure out the effects of these gravitational waves, because the way we measure them is by looking for effects in distances. We want to measure longitudes, distances. When these gravitational waves passed by Earth, which was in 2015, they produced changes in all distances — the distances between all of you, the distances between you and me, our heights — every one of us stretched and shrank a tiny bit. The prediction is that the effect is proportional to the distance. But it’s very small: even for distances much greater than my slight height, the effect is infinitesimal. For example, the distance between the Earth and the Sun changed by one atomic diameter. How can that be measured? How could we measure it?

04:28

Fifty years ago, some visionary physicists at Caltech and MIT — Kip Thorne, Ron Drever, Rai Weiss –thought they could precisely measure distances using lasers that measured distances between mirrors kilometers apart. It took many years, a lot of work and many scientists to develop the technology and develop the ideas. And 20 years later, almost 30 years ago, they started to build two gravitational wave detectors, two interferometers, in the United States. Each one is four kilometers long; one is in Livingston, Louisiana, in the middle of a beautiful forest, and the other is in Hanford, Washington, in the middle of the desert.

05:29

The interferometers have lasers that travel from the center through four kilometers in-vacuum, are reflected in mirrors and then they return. We measure the difference in the distances between this arm and this arm. These detectors are very, very, very sensitive; they’re the most precise instruments in the world. Why did we make two? It’s because the signals that we want to measure come from space, but the mirrors are moving all the time, so in order to distinguish the gravitational wave effects — which are astrophysical effects and should show up on the two detectors — we can distinguish them from the local effects, which appear separately, either on one or the other.

06:19

In September of 2015, we were finishing installing the second-generation technology in the detectors, and we still weren’t at the optimal sensitivity that we wanted — we’re still not, even now, two years later — but we wanted to gather data. We didn’t think we’d see anything, but we were getting ready to start collecting a few months’ worth of data. And then nature surprised us.

06:49

On September 14, 2015, we saw, in both detectors, a gravitational wave. In both detectors, we saw a signal with cycles that increased in amplitude and frequency and then go back down. And they were the same in both detectors. They were gravitational waves. And not only that — in decoding this type of wave, we were able to deduce that they came from black holes fusing together to make one, more than a billion years ago. And that was —

(Applause)

that was fantastic.

07:39

At first, we couldn’t believe it. We didn’t imagine this would happen until much later; it was a surprise for all of us. It took us months to convince ourselves that it was true, because we didn’t want to leave any room for error. But it was true, and to clear up any doubt that the detectors really could measure these things, in December of that same year, we measured another gravitational wave, smaller than the first one. The first gravitational wave produced a difference in the distance of four-thousandths of a proton over four kilometers. Yes, the second detection was smaller, but still very convincing by our standards. Despite the fact that these are space-time waves and not sound waves, we like to put them into loudspeakers and listen to them. We call this “the music of the universe.” I’d like you to listen to the first two notes of that music.

(Chirping sound)

(Chirping sound)

The second, shorter sound was the last fraction of a second of the two black holes which, in that fraction of a second, emitted vast amounts of energy — so much energy, it was like three Suns converting into energy, following that famous formula, E = mc2. Remember that one? We love this music so much we actually dance to it. I’m going to have you listen again.

(Chirping sound)

(Chirping sound)

It’s the music of the universe!

(Applause)

09:35

People frequently ask me now: “What can gravitational waves be used for? And now that you’ve discovered them, what else is there left to do?” What can gravitational waves be used for?

09:50

When they asked Borges, “What is the purpose of poetry?” he, in turn, answered, “What’s the purpose of dawn? What’s the purpose of caresses? What’s the purpose of the smell of coffee?” He answered,”The purpose of poetry is pleasure; it’s for emotion, it’s for living.”

10:11

And understanding the universe, this human curiosity for knowing how everything works, is similar.Since time immemorial, humanity — all of us, everyone, as kids — when we look up at the sky for the first time and see the stars, we wonder, “What are stars?” That curiosity is what makes us human. And that’s what we do with science.

10:39

We like to say that gravitational waves now have a purpose, because we’re opening up a new way to explore the universe. Until now, we were able to see the light of the stars via electromagnetic waves. Now we can listen to the sound of the universe, even of things that don’t emit light, like gravitational waves.

(Applause)

Thank you.

(Applause)

But are they useful? Can’t we derive any technology from gravitational waves?

11:21

Yes, probably. But it will probably take a lot of time. We’ve developed the technology to detect them,but in terms of the waves themselves, maybe we’ll discover 100 years from now that they are useful.But it takes a lot of time to derive technology from science, and that’s not why we do it. All technology is derived from science, but we practice science for the enjoyment. What’s left to do? A lot. A lot; this is only the beginning.

11:54

As we make the detectors more and more sensitive — and we have lots of work to do there — not only are we going to see more black holes and be able to catalog how many there are, where they are and how big they are, we’ll also be able to see other objects. We’ll see neutron stars fuse and turn into black holes. We’ll see a black holes being born. We’ll be able to see rotating stars in our galaxyproduce sinusoidal waves. We’ll be able to see explosions of supernovas in our galaxy. We’ll be seeing a whole spectrum of new sources.

12:35

We like to say that we’ve added a new sense to the human body: now, in addition to seeing, we’re able to hear. This is a revolution in astronomy, like when Galileo invented the telescope. It’s like when they added sound to silent movies. This is just the beginning. We like to think that the road to science is very long — very fun, but very long — and that we, this large, international community of scientists, working from many countries, together as a team, are helping to build that road; that we’re shedding light — sometimes encountering detours — and building, perhaps, a highway to the universe.

Thank you.

(Applause)

La Gravedad

dijous, 27/12/2018

Existing on a knife-edge

dimecres, 26/12/2018

Transcript

 

So last year, on the Fourth of July, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider discovered the Higgs boson. It was a historical day. There’s no doubt that from now on, the Fourth of July will be remembered not as the day of the Declaration of Independence, but as the day of the discovery of the Higgs boson. Well, at least, here at CERN.

00:35

But for me, the biggest surprise of that day was that there was no big surprise. In the eye of a theoretical physicist, the Higgs boson is a clever explanation of how some elementary particles gain mass, but it seems a fairly unsatisfactory and incomplete solution. Too many questions are left unanswered. The Higgs boson does not share the beauty, the symmetry, the elegance, of the rest of the elementary particle world. For this reason, the majority of theoretical physicists believe that the Higgs boson could not be the full story. We were expecting new particles and new phenomena accompanying the Higgs boson. Instead, so far, the measurements coming from the LHC show no signs of new particles or unexpected phenomena.

01:27

Of course, the verdict is not definitive. In 2015, the LHC will almost double the energy of the colliding protons, and these more powerful collisions will allow us to explore further the particle world, and we will certainly learn much more.

01:48

But for the moment, since we have found no evidence for new phenomena, let us suppose that the particles that we know today, including the Higgs boson, are the only elementary particles in nature, even at energies much larger than what we have explored so far. Let’s see where this hypothesis is going to lead us. We will find a surprising and intriguing result about our universe, and to explain my point, let me first tell you what the Higgs is about, and to do so, we have to go back to one tenth of a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. And according to the Higgs theory, at that instant, a dramatic event took place in the universe. Space-time underwent a phase transition. It was something very similar to the phase transition that occurs when water turns into ice below zero degrees. But in our case, the phase transition is not a change in the way the molecules are arranged inside the material, but is about a change of the very fabric of space-time.

03:06

During this phase transition, empty space became filled with a substance that we now call Higgs field.And this substance may seem invisible to us, but it has a physical reality. It surrounds us all the time,just like the air we breathe in this room. And some elementary particles interact with this substance, gaining energy in the process. And this intrinsic energy is what we call the mass of a particle, and by discovering the Higgs boson, the LHC has conclusively proved that this substance is real, because it is the stuff the Higgs bosons are made of. And this, in a nutshell, is the essence of the Higgs story.

03:52

But this story is far more interesting than that. By studying the Higgs theory, theoretical physicists discovered, not through an experiment but with the power of mathematics, that the Higgs field does not necessarily exist only in the form that we observe today. Just like matter can exist as liquid or solid, so the Higgs field, the substance that fills all space-time, could exist in two states. Besides the known Higgs state, there could be a second state in which the Higgs field is billions and billions times denserthan what we observe today, and the mere existence of another state of the Higgs field poses a potential problem. This is because, according to the laws of quantum mechanics, it is possible to have transitions between two states, even in the presence of an energy barrier separating the two states, and the phenomenon is called, quite appropriately, quantum tunneling. Because of quantum tunneling, I could disappear from this room and reappear in the next room, practically penetrating the wall. But don’t expect me to actually perform the trick in front of your eyes, because the probability for me to penetrate the wall is ridiculously small. You would have to wait a really long time before it happens, but believe me, quantum tunneling is a real phenomenon, and it has been observed in many systems. For instance, the tunnel diode, a component used in electronics, works thanks to the wonders of quantum tunneling.

05:46

But let’s go back to the Higgs field. If the ultra-dense Higgs state existed, then, because of quantum tunneling, a bubble of this state could suddenly appear in a certain place of the universe at a certain time, and it is analogous to what happens when you boil water. Bubbles of vapor form inside the water, then they expand, turning liquid into gas. In the same way, a bubble of the ultra-dense Higgs state could come into existence because of quantum tunneling. The bubble would then expand at the speed of light, invading all space, and turning the Higgs field from the familiar state into a new state.

 

06:32

Is this a problem? Yes, it’s a big a problem. We may not realize it in ordinary life, but the intensity of the Higgs field is critical for the structure of matter. If the Higgs field were only a few times more intense, we would see atoms shrinking, neutrons decaying inside atomic nuclei, nuclei disintegrating, and hydrogen would be the only possible chemical element in the universe. And the Higgs field, in the ultra-dense Higgs state, is not just a few times more intense than today, but billions of times, and if space-time were filled by this Higgs state, all atomic matter would collapse. No molecular structures would be possible, no life.

 

07:22

So, I wonder, is it possible that in the future, the Higgs field will undergo a phase transition and, through quantum tunneling, will be transformed into this nasty, ultra-dense state? In other words, I ask myself, what is the fate of the Higgs field in our universe? And the crucial ingredient necessary to answer this question is the Higgs boson mass. And experiments at the LHC found that the mass of the Higgs boson is about 126 GeV. This is tiny when expressed in familiar units, because it’s equal to something like 10 to the minus 22 grams, but it is large in particle physics units, because it is equal to the weight of an entire molecule of a DNA constituent.

 

08:17

So armed with this information from the LHC, together with some colleagues here at CERN, we computed the probability that our universe could quantum tunnel into the ultra-dense Higgs state, and we found a very intriguing result. Our calculations showed that the measured value of the Higgs boson mass is very special. It has just the right value to keep the universe hanging in an unstable situation.The Higgs field is in a wobbly configuration that has lasted so far but that will eventually collapse. So according to these calculations, we are like campers who accidentally set their tent at the edge of a cliff. And eventually, the Higgs field will undergo a phase transition and matter will collapse into itself.

 

09:14

So is this how humanity is going to disappear? I don’t think so. Our calculation shows that quantum tunneling of the Higgs field is not likely to occur in the next 10 to the 100 years, and this is a very long time. It’s even longer than the time it takes for Italy to form a stable government.

(Laughter)

09:40

Even so, we will be long gone by then. In about five billion years, our sun will become a red giant, as large as the Earth’s orbit, and our Earth will be kaput, and in a thousand billion years, if dark energy keeps on fueling space expansion at the present rate, you will not even be able to see as far as your toes, because everything around you expands at a rate faster than the speed of light. So it is really unlikely that we will be around to see the Higgs field collapse.

10:18

But the reason why I am interested in the transition of the Higgs field is because I want to address the question, why is the Higgs boson mass so special? Why is it just right to keep the universe at the edge of a phase transition? Theoretical physicists always ask “why” questions. More than how a phenomenon works, theoretical physicists are always interested in why a phenomenon works in the way it works. We think that this these “why” questions can give us clues about the fundamental principles of nature. And indeed, a possible answer to my question opens up new universes, literally. It has been speculated that our universe is only a bubble in a soapy multiverse made out of a multitude of bubbles, and each bubble is a different universe with different fundamental constants and different physical laws. And in this context, you can only talk about the probability of finding a certain value of the Higgs mass. Then the key to the mystery could lie in the statistical properties of the multiverse. It would be something like what happens with sand dunes on a beach. In principle, you could imagine to find sand dunes of any slope angle in a beach, and yet, the slope angles of sand dunes are typically around 30, 35 degrees. And the reason is simple: because wind builds up the sand, gravity makes it fall. As a result, the vast majority of sand dunes have slope angles around the critical value, near to collapse. And something similar could happen for the Higgs boson mass in the multiverse. In the majority of bubble universes, the Higgs mass could be around the critical value, near to a cosmic collapse of the Higgs field, because of two competing effects, just as in the case of sand.

 

12:32

My story does not have an end, because we still don’t know the end of the story. This is science in progress, and to solve the mystery, we need more data, and hopefully, the LHC will soon add new clues to this story. Just one number, the Higgs boson mass, and yet, out of this number we learn so much. I started from a hypothesis, that the known particles are all there is in the universe, even beyond the domain explored so far. From this, we discovered that the Higgs field that permeates space-time may be standing on a knife edge, ready for cosmic collapse, and we discovered that this may be a hint that our universe is only a grain of sand in a giant beach, the multiverse.

13:33

But I don’t know if my hypothesis is right. That’s how physics works: A single measurement can put us on the road to a new understanding of the universe or it can send us down a blind alley. But whichever it turns out to be, there is one thing I’m sure of: The journey will be full of surprises.

Thank you.       (Applause)

El año pasado, el 4 de julio, experimentos en el Gran Colisionador de Hadrones, GCH, descubrieron el bosón de Higgs. Fue un día histórico. No hay duda de que de ahora en adelante, el 4 de julio será recordado no como el día de la Declaración de Independencia, sino como el día del Descubrimiento del Bosón de Higgs. Bueno, al menos, aquí en el CERN.

Pero para mí, la mayor sorpresa del día fue que no hubo ninguna gran sorpresa. Para el ojo de un físico teórico, el bosón de Higgs es una explicación inteligente de cómo algunas partículas elementales ganan masa; sin embargo, parece una solución bastante insatisfactoria e incompleta. Quedan muchas preguntas sin responder. El bosón de Higgs no comparte la belleza, la simetría, la elegancia, del resto del mundo de las partículas elementales. Por esta razón, la mayoría de los físicos teóricos cree que el bosón de Higgs no puede ser la historia completa. Esperábamos nuevas partículas y fenómenos acompañando al bosón de Higgs. En cambio, hasta ahora, las mediciones procedentes del GCH no muestran signos de nuevas partículas o fenómenos inesperados.

Por supuesto, la sentencia no es definitiva. En el año 2015, el GCH casi doblará la energía de la colisión de protones, y estas colisiones más poderosas permitirán explorar más el mundo de las partículas, y sin duda aprenderemos mucho más.

Pero por el momento, ya que no se ha encontrado evidencia de nuevos fenómenos, esto nos deja suponer que las partículas que conocemos hoy en día, incluyendo el bosón de Higgs, son las únicas partículas elementales en la naturaleza, incluso a energías mucho mayores que las que hemos explorado hasta ahora. Vamos a ver a donde nos llevará esta hipótesis. Nos encontraremos con un resultado sorprendente y fascinante acerca de nuestro universo; y para explicar mi punto, primero les explicaré qué es el Higgs, y para hacerlo, tenemos que retroceder a un diezmilmillonésimo de segundo después del Big Bang. Y según la teoría de Higgs, en ese instante, se produjo un acontecimiento dramático en el universo. El espacio-tiempo experimentó una transición de fase. Fue algo muy similar a la transición de fase que ocurre cuando el agua se convierte en hielo por debajo de los cero grados. Pero en nuestro caso, la transición de fase no es un cambio en la forma como las moléculas se organizan dentro de la materia, sino que se trata de un cambio de la estructura del espacio-tiempo.

 

Durante esta transición de fase, el espacio vacío se llenó de una sustancia que ahora llamamos campo de Higgs. Y esta sustancia puede parecer invisible para nosotros, pero tiene una realidad física. Nos rodea todo el tiempo, al igual que el aire que respiramos en esta habitación. Y algunas partículas elementales interactúan con esta sustancia, obteniendo energía en el proceso. Y esta energía intrínseca es lo que llamamos la masa de una partícula, y al descubrir el bosón de Higgs, el GCH ha demostrado concluyentemente que esta sustancia es real, porque las cosas están constituidas por los bosones de Higgs. Y esto, en pocas palabras, es la esencia de la historia de Higgs.

 

Pero esta historia es mucho más interesante. Mediante el estudio de la teoría de Higgs, físicos teóricos descubrieron, no a través de un experimento sino mediante el poder de las matemáticas, que el campo de Higgs no existe necesariamente solamente en la forma que observamos hoy. Al igual que la materia puede existir como líquido o sólido, el campo de Higgs, la sustancia que llena todo el espacio-tiempo, podría existir en dos estados. Además el estado de Higgs conocido, podría haber adoptado un segundo estado donde el campo de Higgs es miles de millones de veces más denso que lo que observamos hoy en día, y la mera existencia de otro estado del campo de Higgs plantea un problema potencial. Esto es porque, de acuerdo a las leyes de la mecánica cuántica, es posible tener transiciones entre dos estados, incluso en presencia de una barrera de energía que separe los dos estados, un fenómeno llamado, muy apropiadamente, efecto túnel cuántico. Debido al efecto túnel cuántico yo podría desaparecer de esta habitación y aparecer en la habitación de al lado, prácticamente penetrando la pared. Pero no esperen que realice el truco ante sus ojos, porque la probabilidad para mí de atravesar la pared es ridículamente pequeña. Tendrán que esperar mucho tiempo antes de que suceda, pero créanme, el efecto túnel cuántico es un fenómeno real, y se ha observado en muchos sistemas. Por ejemplo, el diodo túnel, un componente usado en electrónica, funciona gracias a las maravillas del efecto túnel cuántico.

 

Pero volvamos al campo de Higgs. Si existiera el estado Higgs ultra denso, entonces, debido al efecto túnel cuántico, una burbuja de este estado podría aparecer de repente en algún lugar del universo en un momento determinado, lo que es análogo a lo que sucede cuando el agua hierve. Las burbujas de vapor se forman dentro del agua, luego se expanden, convirtiendo líquido en gas. De la misma manera, una burbuja del estado Higgs ultra denso podría venir a la existencia por el efecto túnel cuántico. Luego se expandiría la burbuja a la velocidad de la luz, invadiendo todo el espacio y convirtiendo el campo de Higgs del estado familiar al nuevo estado.

 

¿Esto es un problema? Sí, es un gran problema. No puede ocurrirnos en la vida cotidiana, pero la intensidad del campo de Higgs es crítica para la estructura de la materia. Si el campo de Higgs fuera un poco más intenso, veríamos átomos encogiéndose, neutrones decayendo dentro de los núcleos atómicos, los núcleos desintegrándose, y el hidrógeno sería el único elemento químico posible en el universo. El campo de Higgs, en su estado de Higgs ultra denso, no solo es un par de veces más intenso que en la actualidad, sino miles de millones de veces, y si el espacio-tiempo se llenara con ese estado de Higgs, toda la materia atómica colapsaría. No existirían estructuras moleculares, ni vida.

 

Entonces, me pregunto, ¿es posible que en el futuro, el campo de Higgs sufra una transición de fase y, a través del efecto túnel cuántico, se transforme en este estado desagradable, ultra denso? En otras palabras, me pregunto, ¿cuál es el destino del campo de Higgs en nuestro universo? Y el ingrediente crucial necesario para responder a esta pregunta es la masa del bosón de Higgs. Y experimentos en el GCH encontraron que la masa del bosón de Higgs es aproximadamente 126 GeV. Esto es pequeño cuando se expresa en unidades familiares, porque es igual a 10 a la menos 22 gramos. Pero es grande en las unidades de la física de partículas, porque es igual al peso de una molécula entera de un constituyente del ADN.

 

Armados con esta información del GCH, junto con algunos colegas aquí en el CERN, calculamos la probabilidad de que nuestro universo pudiera atravesar el túnel cuántico al estado de Higgs ultra denso, y hemos encontrado un resultado muy interesante. Nuestros cálculos han demostrado que el valor medido de la masa de bosón de Higgs es muy especial. Tiene justo el valor correcto para mantener suspendido al universo en una situación inestable. El campo de Higgs está en una configuración inestable que se ha mantenido hasta ahora pero que finalmente se derrumbará. Así que según estos cálculos, somos como los campistas que accidentalmente ponen su tienda en el borde de un precipicio. Y finalmente, el campo de Higgs experimentará una transición de fase y la materia se derrumbará en sí misma.

 

¿Así es cómo la humanidad va a desaparecer? No lo creo. Nuestro cálculo muestra que ese efecto túnel cuántico del campo de Higgs no es probable que se produzca en los próximos 10 a la 100 años y eso es mucho tiempo. Es incluso más que el tiempo que tarda Italia en formar un gobierno estable.

(Risas)

 

Aún así, para entonces ya nos habremos ido hace tiempo. En unos 5 mil millones de años, nuestro Sol se convertirá en una gigante roja, tan grande como la órbita de la Tierra, y nuestra Tierra será “kaput”, y en un billón de años, si la energía oscura sigue impulsando la expansión del espacio al ritmo actual, ni siquiera podrán ver más allá de sus pies, porque todo a su alrededor se expandirá a un ritmo más rápido que la velocidad de la luz. Así que es muy poco probable que estemos por allí para ver el colapso del campo de Higgs.

 

Pero la razón para interesarme en la transición del campo de Higgs es porque quiero abordar la cuestión, ¿por qué es la masa del bosón de Higgs tan especial? ¿Por qué es justo la correcta para mantener el universo en el borde de una transición de fase? Los físicos teóricos siempre preguntan “por qué”. Mucho más que “cómo” funciona un fenómeno, los físicos teóricos siempre están interesados en “por qué” un fenómeno funciona de la manera que funciona. Creemos que estas preguntas de “por qué” nos pueden dar pistas acerca de los principios fundamentales de la naturaleza. Y en efecto, una posible respuesta a mi pregunta abre nuevos universos, literalmente. Se ha especulado que nuestro universo es solo una burbuja en un multiverso jabonoso hecho de una multitud de burbujas, y cada burbuja es un universo diferente con diferentes constantes fundamentales y diferentes leyes físicas. Y en este contexto, solo se puede hablar de la probabilidad de encontrar un determinado valor de la masa de Higgs. Entonces la clave del misterio podría residir en las propiedades estadísticas del multiverso. Sería algo parecido a lo que sucede con las dunas de arena en una playa. En principio, uno podría imaginar encontrar dunas de arena con cualquier ángulo de pendiente en una playa, y sin embargo, los ángulos de inclinación de las dunas de arena típicamente miden alrededor de 30, 35 grados. Y la razón es simple: el viento acumula la arena y la gravedad la hace caer. Como resultado, la mayoría de las dunas de arena tienen ángulos de inclinación alrededor del valor crítico, cerca del colapso. Y algo similar podría suceder para la masa del bosón de Higgs en el multiverso. En la mayoría de los universos burbuja, la masa de Higgs podría estar alrededor del valor crítico, cerca de un colapso cósmico del campo de Higgs, debido a dos efectos en competencia, igual que en el caso de la arena.

Mi historia no tiene un fin, porque aún no sabemos el final de la historia. Esto es ciencia en progreso, y para resolver el misterio, necesitamos más datos, y espero que el GCH pronto añada nuevas pistas a esta historia. Solo un número, la masa del bosón de Higgs, y sin embargo, de este número aprendemos mucho. Yo empecé desde una hipótesis, que las partículas conocidas son todo lo que hay en el universo, incluso más allá del dominio explorado hasta ahora. De esto, descubrimos que el campo de Higgs que impregna el espacio-tiempo puede estar permanentemente al filo de la navaja, listo para el colapso cósmico, y descubrimos que esta puede ser una pista de que nuestro universo es solo un grano de arena en una playa gigante, el multiverso.

Pero no sé si mi hipótesis es correcta. Así es como funciona la física: una sola medición puede ponernos en el camino a una nueva comprensión del universo o nos puede enviar a un callejón sin salida. Pero en cualquier caso de una cosa estoy seguro: El viaje estará lleno de sorpresas.

Gracias.
(Aplausos)