The arrow of time: Sean Carroll

 

Transcript Translated by Francisco Gnecco
Reviewed by Sebastian Betti
The universe is really big. We live in a galaxy, the Milky Way Galaxy. There are about a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. And if you take a camera and you point it at a random part of the sky, and you just keep the shutter open, as long as your camera is attached to the Hubble Space Telescope, it will see something like this. Every one of these little blobs is a galaxy roughly the size of our Milky Way — a hundred billion stars in each of those blobs. There are approximately a hundred billion galaxies in the observable universe. 100 billion is the only number you need to know. The age of the universe, between now and the Big Bang, is a hundred billion in dog years. (Laughter) Which tells you something about our place in the universe. 

00:58

One thing you can do with a picture like this is simply admire it. It’s extremely beautiful. I’ve often wondered, what is the evolutionary pressure that made our ancestors in the Veldt adapt and evolve to really enjoy pictures of galaxies when they didn’t have any. But we would also like to understand it. As a cosmologist, I want to ask, why is the universe like this? One big clue we have is that the universe is changing with time. If you looked at one of these galaxies and measured its velocity, it would be moving away from you. And if you look at a galaxy even farther away, it would be moving away faster. So we say the universe is expanding.

01:32

What that means, of course, is that, in the past, things were closer together. In the past, the universe was more dense, and it was also hotter. If you squeeze things together, the temperature goes up. That kind of makes sense to us. The thing that doesn’t make sense to us as much is that the universe, at early times, near the Big Bang, was also very, very smooth. You might think that that’s not a surprise. The air in this room is very smooth. You might say, “Well, maybe things just smoothed themselves out.” But the conditions near the Big Bang are very, very different than the conditions of the air in this room. In particular, things were a lot denser. The gravitational pull of things was a lot stronger near the Big Bang.

02:09

What you have to think about is we have a universe with a hundred billion galaxies, a hundred billion stars each. At early times, those hundred billion galaxies were squeezed into a region about this big — literally — at early times. And you have to imagine doing that squeezing without any imperfections, without any little spots where there were a few more atoms than somewhere else. Because if there had been, they would have collapsed under the gravitational pull into a huge black hole. Keeping the universe very, very smooth at early times is not easy; it’s a delicate arrangement. It’s a clue that the early universe is not chosen randomly. There is something that made it that way. We would like to know what.

 

02:49

So part of our understanding of this was given to us by Ludwig Boltzmann, an Austrian physicist in the 19th century. And Boltzmann’s contribution was that he helped us understand entropy. You’ve heard of entropy. It’s the randomness, the disorder, the chaoticness of some systems. Boltzmann gave us a formula — engraved on his tombstone now — that really quantifies what entropy is. And it’s basically just saying that entropy is the number of ways we can rearrange the constituents of a system so that you don’t notice, so that macroscopically it looks the same. If you have the air in this room, you don’t notice each individual atom. A low entropy configuration is one in which there’s only a few arrangements that look that way. A high entropy arrangement is one that there are many arrangements that look that way. This is a crucially important insight because it helps us explain the second law of thermodynamics — the law that says that entropy increases in the universe, or in some isolated bit of the universe.

03:42

The reason why entropy increases is simply because there are many more ways to be high entropy than to be low entropy. That’s a wonderful insight, but it leaves something out. This insight that entropy increases, by the way, is what’s behind what we call the arrow of time, the difference between the past and the future. Every difference that there is between the past and the future is because entropy is increasing — the fact that you can remember the past, but not the future. The fact that you are born, and then you live, and then you die, always in that order, that’s because entropy is increasing. Boltzmann explained that if you start with low entropy, it’s very natural for it to increase because there’s more ways to be high entropy. What he didn’t explain was why the entropy was ever low in the first place.

04:28

The fact that the entropy of the universe was low was a reflection of the fact that the early universe was very, very smooth. We’d like to understand that. That’s our job as cosmologists. Unfortunately, it’s actually not a problem that we’ve been giving enough attention to. It’s not one of the first things people would say, if you asked a modern cosmologist, “What are the problems we’re trying to address?” One of the people who did understand that this was a problem was Richard Feynman. 50 years ago, he gave a series of a bunch of different lectures. He gave the popular lectures that became “The Character of Physical Law.” He gave lectures to Caltech undergrads that became “The Feynman Lectures on Physics.” He gave lectures to Caltech graduate students that became “The Feynman Lectures on Gravitation.” In every one of these books, every one of these sets of lectures, he emphasized this puzzle: Why did the early universe have such a small entropy?

05:14

So he says — I’m not going to do the accent — he says, “For some reason, the universe, at one time, had a very low entropy for its energy content, and since then the entropy has increased. The arrow of time cannot be completely understood until the mystery of the beginnings of the history of the universe are reduced still further from speculation to understanding.” So that’s our job. We want to know — this is 50 years ago, “Surely,” you’re thinking, “we’ve figured it out by now.” It’s not true that we’ve figured it out by now.

05:42

The reason the problem has gotten worse, rather than better, is because in 1998 we learned something crucial about the universe that we didn’t know before. We learned that it’s accelerating. The universe is not only expanding. If you look at the galaxy, it’s moving away. If you come back a billion years later and look at it again, it will be moving away faster. Individual galaxies are speeding away from us faster and faster so we say the universe is accelerating. Unlike the low entropy of the early universe, even though we don’t know the answer for this, we at least have a good theory that can explain it, if that theory is right, and that’s the theory of dark energy. It’s just the idea that empty space itself has energy.

06:20

In every little cubic centimeter of space, whether or not there’s stuff, whether or not there’s particles, matter, radiation or whatever, there’s still energy, even in the space itself. And this energy, according to Einstein, exerts a push on the universe. It is a perpetual impulse that pushes galaxies apart from each other. Because dark energy, unlike matter or radiation, does not dilute away as the universe expands. The amount of energy in each cubic centimeter remains the same, even as the universe gets bigger and bigger. This has crucial implications for what the universe is going to do in the future. For one thing, the universe will expand forever.

 

06:59

Back when I was your age, we didn’t know what the universe was going to do. Some people thought that the universe would recollapse in the future. Einstein was fond of this idea. But if there’s dark energy, and the dark energy does not go away, the universe is just going to keep expanding forever and ever and ever. 14 billion years in the past, 100 billion dog years, but an infinite number of years into the future. Meanwhile, for all intents and purposes, space looks finite to us. Space may be finite or infinite, but because the universe is accelerating, there are parts of it we cannot see and never will see. There’s a finite region of space that we have access to, surrounded by a horizon. So even though time goes on forever, space is limited to us. Finally, empty space has a temperature.

07:45

In the 1970s, Stephen Hawking told us that a black hole, even though you think it’s black, it actually emits radiation when you take into account quantum mechanics. The curvature of space-time around the black hole brings to life the quantum mechanical fluctuation, and the black hole radiates. A precisely similar calculation by Hawking and Gary Gibbons showed that if you have dark energy in empty space, then the whole universe radiates. The energy of empty space brings to life quantum fluctuations. And so even though the universe will last forever, and ordinary matter and radiation will dilute away, there will always be some radiation, some thermal fluctuations, even in empty space. So what this means is that the universe is like a box of gas that lasts forever. Well what is the implication of that?

08:33

That implication was studied by Boltzmann back in the 19th century. He said, well, entropy increases because there are many, many more ways for the universe to be high entropy, rather than low entropy. But that’s a probabilistic statement. It will probably increase, and the probability is enormously huge. It’s not something you have to worry about — the air in this room all gathering over one part of the room and suffocating us. It’s very, very unlikely. Except if they locked the doors and kept us here literally forever, that would happen. Everything that is allowed, every configuration that is allowed to be obtained by the molecules in this room, would eventually be obtained.

09:12

So Boltzmann says, look, you could start with a universe that was in thermal equilibrium. He didn’t know about the Big Bang. He didn’t know about the expansion of the universe. He thought that space and time were explained by Isaac Newton — they were absolute; they just stuck there forever. So his idea of a natural universe was one in which the air molecules were just spread out evenly everywhere — the everything molecules. But if you’re Boltzmann, you know that if you wait long enough, the random fluctuations of those molecules will occasionally bring them into lower entropy configurations. And then, of course, in the natural course of things, they will expand back. So it’s not that entropy must always increase — you can get fluctuations into lower entropy, more organized situations.

09:53

Well if that’s true, Boltzmann then goes onto invent two very modern-sounding ideas — the multiverse and the anthropic principle. He says, the problem with thermal equilibrium is that we can’t live there. Remember, life itself depends on the arrow of time. We would not be able to process information, metabolize, walk and talk, if we lived in thermal equilibrium. So if you imagine a very, very big universe, an infinitely big universe, with randomly bumping into each other particles, there will occasionally be small fluctuations in the lower entropy states, and then they relax back. But there will also be large fluctuations. Occasionally, you will make a planet or a star or a galaxy or a hundred billion galaxies. So Boltzmann says, we will only live in the part of the multiverse, in the part of this infinitely big set of fluctuating particles, where life is possible. That’s the region where entropy is low. Maybe our universe is just one of those things that happens from time to time.

10:51

Now your homework assignment is to really think about this, to contemplate what it means. Carl Sagan once famously said that “in order to make an apple pie, you must first invent the universe.” But he was not right. In Boltzmann’s scenario, if you want to make an apple pie, you just wait for the random motion of atoms to make you an apple pie. That will happen much more frequently than the random motions of atoms making you an apple orchard and some sugar and an oven, and then making you an apple pie. So this scenario makes predictions. And the predictions are that the fluctuations that make us are minimal. Even if you imagine that this room we are in now exists and is real and here we are, and we have, not only our memories, but our impression that outside there’s something called Caltech and the United States and the Milky Way Galaxy, it’s much easier for all those impressions to randomly fluctuate into your brain than for them actually to randomly fluctuate into Caltech, the United States and the galaxy.

 

11:51

The good news is that, therefore, this scenario does not work; it is not right. This scenario predicts that we should be a minimal fluctuation. Even if you left our galaxy out, you would not get a hundred billion other galaxies. And Feynman also understood this. Feynman says, “From the hypothesis that the world is a fluctuation, all the predictions are that if we look at a part of the world we’ve never seen before, we will find it mixed up, and not like the piece we’ve just looked at — high entropy. If our order were due to a fluctuation, we would not expect order anywhere but where we have just noticed it. We therefore conclude the universe is not a fluctuation.” So that’s good. The question is then what is the right answer? If the universe is not a fluctuation, why did the early universe have a low entropy? And I would love to tell you the answer, but I’m running out of time.

(Laughter)

 

12:38

Here is the universe that we tell you about, versus the universe that really exists. I just showed you this picture. The universe is expanding for the last 10 billion years or so. It’s cooling off. But we now know enough about the future of the universe to say a lot more. If the dark energy remains around, the stars around us will use up their nuclear fuel, they will stop burning. They will fall into black holes. We will live in a universe with nothing in it but black holes. That universe will last 10 to the 100 years — a lot longer than our little universe has lived. The future is much longer than the past. But even black holes don’t last forever. They will evaporate, and we will be left with nothing but empty space. That empty space lasts essentially forever. However, you notice, since empty space gives off radiation, there’s actually thermal fluctuations, and it cycles around all the different possible combinations of the degrees of freedom that exist in empty space. So even though the universe lasts forever, there’s only a finite number of things that can possibly happen in the universe. They all happen over a period of time equal to 10 to the 10 to the 120 years.

13:44

So here’s two questions for you. Number one: If the universe lasts for 10 to the 10 to the 120 years, why are we born in the first 14 billion years of it, in the warm, comfortable afterglow of the Big Bang? Why aren’t we in empty space? You might say, “Well there’s nothing there to be living,” but that’s not right. You could be a random fluctuation out of the nothingness. Why aren’t you? More homework assignment for you.

 

14:10

So like I said, I don’t actually know the answer. I’m going to give you my favorite scenario. Either it’s just like that. There is no explanation. This is a brute fact about the universe that you should learn to accept and stop asking questions. Or maybe the Big Bang is not the beginning of the universe. An egg, an unbroken egg, is a low entropy configuration, and yet, when we open our refrigerator, we do not go, “Hah, how surprising to find this low entropy configuration in our refrigerator.” That’s because an egg is not a closed system; it comes out of a chicken. Maybe the universe comes out of a universal chicken. Maybe there is something that naturally, through the growth of the laws of physics, gives rise to universe like ours in low entropy configurations. If that’s true, it would happen more than once; we would be part of a much bigger multiverse. That’s my favorite scenario.

15:01

So the organizers asked me to end with a bold speculation. My bold speculation is that I will be absolutely vindicated by history. And 50 years from now, all of my current wild ideas will be accepted as truths by the scientific and external communities. We will all believe that our little universe is just a small part of a much larger multiverse. And even better, we will understand what happened at the Big Bang in terms of a theory that we will be able to compare to observations. This is a prediction. I might be wrong. But we’ve been thinking as a human race about what the universe was like, why it came to be in the way it did for many, many years. It’s exciting to think we may finally know the answer someday.

Thank you.

(Applause)

El Universo es realmente grande. Vivimos en una galaxia, la Vía Láctea. Hay unas cien mil millones de estrellas en la Vía Láctea. Y si toman sus cámaras y las enfocan hacia cualquier parte del firmamento y dejan el obturador abierto, siempre que la cámara esté atada al Telescopio espacial Hubble, se verá algo como esto. Cada una de estas pequeñas gotas es una galaxia aproximadamente del mismo tamaño de la Vía Láctea; cien mil millones de estrellas en cada una de esas gotas. Hay unas cien mil millones de galaxias en el Universo observable. Cien mil millones es el único número que hay que saber. La edad del Universo, desde el Big Bang hasta ahora, es como cien mil millones de años caninos. (Risas) Esto nos dice algo sobre nuestro lugar en el Universo. 

00:58

Algo que podemos hacer con una foto como ésta, es simplemente admirarla. Es en extremo hermo-sa. A menudo me pregunto, ¿cuál sería la presión evolutiva que hizo que nuestros antepasados en las praderas africanas se adaptaran y evolucio-naran hasta llegar a disfrutar las fotos de las galaxias cuando aún no tenían ninguna? Nos encantaría entenderlo. Como cosmólogo, quisiera preguntar ¿por qué el Universo es como es? Un gran indicio que tenemos es que con el tiempo, el Universo ha ido cambiando. Si miramos una de estas galaxias y medimos su velocidad, vemos que se aleja de nosotros. Y si miramos otra galaxia más lejana aún, se ve moverse más rápido. Así, decimos que el Universo está un expansión.

01:32

Esto quiere decir, desde luego, que en el pasado, las cosas estaban más cerca. En el pasado, el Universo era más denso y también más caliente. Si las cosas se comprimen, se eleva la temperatu-ra. Eso tiene sentido. Lo que no parece tener tanto sentido es que el Universo, en su inicio, cerca al Big Bang, era también muy, muy homogéneo. Podría pensarse que esto no es sorpresivo. El aire en esta sala es bien homogéneo. Podría decirse, “bueno, quizá las cosas se homogeneizaron solas”. Pero las condiciones cercanas al Big Bang eran muy, muy diferentes de las del aire de esta sala. En especial, todo era mucho más denso. La fuerza de la gravedad era mucho más fuerte cerca al Big Bang.

02:09

Lo que hay que pensar es que tenemos un Universo con cien mil millones de galaxias, de cien mil millones de estrellas cada una. En el principio esas cien mil millones de galaxias estaban concentradas en una región de este tamaño, literalmente, en los tiempos iniciales. Imagínense Uds produciendo esa compactación, sin imperfecciones, sin ningún punto con unos pocos átomos de más que en otros lugares. Porque si lo hubiera habido, habría colapsado por la fuerza gravitatoria para volverse un enorme agujero negro. Conservar el Universo bien homogéneo en etapas tempranas, no es fácil; es un arreglo delicado. Es un indicio de que el Universo primitivo no se elige al azar. Hay algo que lo hizo así. Quisiéramos saber qué fue.

02:49

En parte lo que sabemos sobre esto se lo debemos a Ludwig Boltzmann, un físico austríaco del siglo XIX. Boltzmann ayudó a entender la entropía. Habrán oído de la entropía. Es la aleatoridad, el desorden, el caos de un sistema. Boltzmann nos dio una fórmula, ahora grabada en su tumba, que cuantifica la entropía. Básicamente, es como decir que la entropía es la cantidad de formas en que pueden organizarse las partes de un sistema, sin que se note, o sea, que macroscópicamente se vea igual. En el aire de este salón, no se nota cada átomo en forma individual. Una configuración de baja entropía es aquella que tiene pocas maneras de lograrlo. Una configuración de alta entropía es aquella en la que hay muchas maneras de hacer-lo. Esta es una idea muy importante, porque nos ayuda a entender la segunda ley de la termodi-námica; la que dice que la entropía aumenta en el Universo o en partes aisladas del Universo.

 

03:42

La razón por la que aumenta la entropía es simplemente porque hay muchas más formas de tener alta entropía, que de tenerla baja. Una idea estupenda. pero deja algo por fuera. A propósito, esta idea de que la entropía crece, es el funda-mento de lo que llamamos la flecha del tiempo, la diferencia entre el pasado y el futuro. Todas las diferencias que hay entre el pasado y el futuro se deben al aumento de la entropía; lo cual hace que podamos recordar el pasado, pero no el futuro. Que nacemos, luego vivimos y después morimos, siempre en ese orden, se debe a que la entropía va en aumento. Boltzmann explicaba que si se empieza con baja entropía, es muy natural que ésta aumente, porque hay más maneras de tener alta entropía. Lo que él nunca dijo es, por qué la entropía era tan baja al principio.

04:28

Que la entropía del Universo fuese baja es otra manera de decir que el Universo era muy, muy homogéneo. Nos gustaría entender esto. Esa es nuestra tarea como cosmólogos. Desafortunadamente, este no es un problema al que le hayamos dedicado suficiente atención. No es una de las primeras respuestas que contestaría un cosmólogo moderno, a la pregunta: “¿Cuáles son los problemas que están abordando?” Uno de los que sí entendió que ahí había un problema fue Richard Feynman. Hace 50 años que dio unas cuantas conferencias. Dictó las conocidas charlas denominadas “El carácter de la ley física”. Dio clases a los estudiantes de pregrado de Caltech que luego se llamaron “Clases de física de Feynman”. Dictó clases a los estudiantes gra-duados de Caltech que se volvieron “Clases de gravitación de Feynman”. En todos sus libros, en todas esas series, él hacía hincapié en el enigma: ¿por qué el Universo temprano tenía tan baja entropía?

05:14

El decía (no voy a imitar su acento) “Por alguna razón el Universo en ese tiempo, tenía baja entropía para su contenido de energía y desde entonces la entropía ha venido creciendo. No es posible entender completamente la flecha del tiempo sin antes descubrir el misterio del co-mienzo del Universo, avanzando de la especu-lación a la comprensión”. Y ese es nuestro tra-bajo. Queremos conocerlo –esto fue hace 50 años, “Sí, claro”, pensarán Uds. “pensábamos que estaba resuelto” Pero no es cierto que ya esté resuelto.

05:42

La razón por la que el problema se ha compli-cado, en lugar de mejorarse, es porque en 1998 se descubrió algo crucial sobre el Universo, que antes no se sabía. Se supo que está acelerándose. El Universo no sólo se está expandiendo. Si miramos una galaxia, se está alejando. Y si volvemos a mirar mil millones de años después, la veremos moverse más rápido. Las galaxias, individualmente, se aceleran alejándose cada vez más rápido. Por eso decimos que el Universo se está acelerando. A diferencia de la baja entropía del Universo temprano, aunque no sabemos la respuesta, al menos tenemos una buena teoría para explicarlo, esperemos sea la correcta, es la teoría de la energía oscura. Es la idea que dice que el espacio vacío tiene energía.

 

06:20

En cada pequeño centímetro cúbico de espacio, haya o no algo ahí, haya o no partículas, materia, radiación o lo que sea, de todas formas hay energía en el espacio mismo. Y, según Einstein, esta energía ejerce presión sobre el Universo. Un impulso perpetuo que hace alejar las galaxias, unas de otras. Porque la energía oscura, a diferencia de la materia o la radiación, no se diluye con la expansión del Universo. La cantidad de energía en cada centímetro cúbico permanece igual, aunque el Universo se haga cada vez más grande. Esto tiene unas implicaciones cruciales en el futuro del Universo. En primer lugar, el Universo siempre continuará expandiéndose.

06:59

Cuando yo tenía la edad de ustedes, no sabíamos lo que iba a pasar con el Universo. Algunos pensaban que en el futuro volvería a colapsar. Einstein creía eso. Pero si existe la energía oscura y ésta no desaparece, el Universo continuará expandiéndose eternamente. 14 mil millones de años en el pasado, 100 mil millones de años caninos, una cantidad infinita de años hacia el futuro. Entre tanto, desde todo punto de vista, vemos el espacio como finito. Puede ser finito o infinito, pero como el Universo se está acelerando, hay partes que no podemos ver y nunca veremos. Hay una región finita del espacio a la cual podemos acceder, limitada por un horizonte. Así, aunque el tiempo continúe para siempre, el espacio, para nosotros, es limitado. Finalmente, el espacio vacío tiene una temperatura.

07:45

En la década del 70, Stephen Hawking dijo que un agujero negro, aunque se crea que es negro, en realidad emite radiación, de acuerdo con la mecánica cuántica. La curvatura del espacio-tiempo cerca de un agujero negro hace realidad las fluctuaciones mecánico-cuánticas, y el agujero negro emite radiación. Unos cálculos similares, muy precisos, de Hawking y Gary Gibbons, demostraron que si se tiene energía oscura en el espacio vacío, el Universo entero emite radiación. La energía del espacio vacío hace realidad las fluctuaciones cuánticas. Y aunque el Universo dure eternamente y la materia común y la radiación se diluyan, siempre habrá algo de radiación, algunas fluctuaciones térmicas, aún en el espacio vacío. Lo que quiero decir es que el Universo es como una caja llena de gas que durará eternamente. ¿Y eso qué consecuencia tiene?

08:33

Boltzmann estudió la consecuencia en el siglo XIX. Él dijo que la entropía aumenta porque hay muchas más formas que el Universo tenga alta entropía, a que la tenga baja. Pero esta es una afirmación probabilística. Se espera que siga aumentando con una probabilidad enormemente grande. No hay por qué preocuparse porque el aire en esta sala se concentre en una pequeña parte y nos asfixiemos. Es muy, muy poco probable. Salvo que cerraran las puertas y nos mantuvieran aquí, literalmente para siempre, así sí podría suceder. Todo lo que es permitido, toda configuración permitida para las moléculas en este salón, eventualmente podría ocurrir.

 

09:12

Boltzmann dice que podríamos comenzar con un Universo en equilibrio térmico. Él no sabía nada del Big Bang, ni de la expansión del Universo. Él pensaba que el espacio y el tiempo, como lo explicó Isaac Newton, eran absolutos y que así continuarían eternamente. Su idea de un Universo natural era tal que las moléculas de aire se esparcían uniformemente por todas partes, moléculas de todo. Pero si usted fuera Boltzmann, sabría que si espera lo suficiente, las fluctuaciones aleatorias de esas moléculas eventualmente las llevarán a configuraciones de entropía menor. Y entonces, en el curso natural de las cosas, se expandirán nuevamente. O sea, no es que la entropía siempre aumente; pueden tenerse fluctuaciones de menor entropía, situaciones más organizadas.

09:53

Y si esto es cierto, Boltzmann habría inventado dos ideas que hoy suenan muy modernas; el multiverso y el principio antrópico. Él decía que el problema del equilibrio térmico es que no podemos vivir en él. Recuerden que la vida misma depende de la flecha del tiempo. No podríamos procesar información, metabolizar, caminar o hablar si viviéramos en equilibrio térmico. Imagínense ahora un Universo muy, muy grande, infinitamente grande, con partículas que se chocan al azar; ocasionalmente habrá pequeñas fluctuaciones con estados de baja entropía para luego volver al estado de distensión. Pero también habrá grandes fluctuaciones. Ocasionalmente surgirá un planeta o una estrella, o una galaxia, o cien mil millones de galaxias. Y Boltzmann dice que solamente viviremos en esta parte del multiverso, en esta parte del conjunto infinitamente grande de partículas que fluctúan, donde es posible la vida. Esa es la región de baja entropía. Puede que nuestro Universo sea una de esas cosas que suceden cada tanto.

10:51

Ahora viene la tarea para Uds.; hay que pensar en esto, pensar qué significa. Carl Sagan dijo una vez: “para hacer un pastel de manzana, primero hay que inventar el Universo”. Pero no es correcto. En el escenario de Boltzmann, si quieres hacer un pastel de manzana, sólo hay que esperar a que los movimientos aleatorios de los átomos te hagan el pastel. Eso sucederá con frecuencia mucho mayor a que los movimientos aleatorios de los átomos generen una huerta de manzanos azúcar, un horno y luego hagan el pastel de manzana. Este escenario hace predicciones. Y esas predicciones dicen que las fluctuaciones que nos generan a nosotros, son mínimas. Imagínense que este salón en el que estamos hoy existe y es real y aquí estamos, y no sólo tenemos recuerdos sino también la impresión de que allá afuera hay algo llamado Caltech y los Estados Unidos y la Vía Láctea. Es más fácil que estas impresiones fluctúen aleatoriamente en sus cerebros a que las cosas, en la realidad, fluctúen y existan Caltech y los Estados Unidos y la galaxia.

11:51

La buena noticia es que, como consecuencia, ese escenario no se da; no es correcto. El escenario predice que somos una mínima fluctuación. Aunque dejáramos por fuera nuestra galaxia, no llegaríamos a tener cien mil millones de otras galaxias. Y Feynman también entendía esto. Él dijo: “Por la hipótesis de que el mundo es una fluctuación, las predicciones dicen que si miramos una parte del mundo que nunca antes habíamos visto, la encontraremos toda revuelta, más que cualquiera que vimos antes; con mayor entropía. Si nuestro orden se debe a una fluctuación, no podemos esperar orden en todas partes, sólo en donde lo acabamos de encontrar. Por consiguiente, concluimos que el Universo no es una fluctuación”. Eso está bien. La pregunta es entonces: ¿Cuál será la respuesta? Si el Universo no es una fluctuación, ¿por qué razón el Universo temprano tiene baja entropía? Me encantaría poder darles la respuesta, pero se me está acabando el tiempo.

(Risas)

12:38

Aquí está el Universo del que hablábamos, frente al que existe en realidad. Ya les había mostrado esta gráfica. El Universo se viene expandiendo desde hace unos 10 mil millones de años. Se viene enfriando. Pero ahora sabemos lo suficiente sobre el futuro del Universo, dicho ambiciosamente. Si la energía oscura permanece a nuestro alrededor, las estrellas que nos rodean usarán todo su combustible nuclear y dejarán de alumbrar. Se reducirán a agujeros negros. Viviremos en un Universo sin nada, sólo agujeros negros. Ese Universo habrá de durar 10 elevado a la 100 años; mucho más de lo que ha vivido hasta ahora. El futuro es mucho más largo que el pasado. Pero aún los agujeros negros no duran para siempre. Se evaporan y quedaremos sin nada, sólo espacio vacío. Ese espacio vacío, esencialmente ha de durar eternamente. Sin embargo, fíjense que como ese espacio vacío emite radiación, habrá fluctuaciones térmicas y se reciclarán las distintas combinaciones posibles de los grados de libertad que existan en el espacio vacío. Así que aunque el Universo ha de durar para siempre, sólo habrá un número finito de cosas que pueden suceder en él. Y todas ellas han de suceder en un período de tiempo igual a 10 elevado a la 10, elevado a la 120, años.

13:44

Y ahora hay dos preguntas para ustedes. La primera: Si el Universo durará 10 elevado a la 10, elevado a la 120, años, ¿por qué razón nacimos en los primeros 14 mil millones de años, pasado el Big Bang, en un momento cálido y confortable, ¿Por qué no estamos en el espacio vacío? Dirán ustedes, “es que no hay nada ahí para vivir”. Pero eso no es correcto. Podríamos ser una fluctuación aleatoria de esa nada. ¿Por qué no lo somos? Otra tarea para el hogar.

14:10

Cómo ya dije: no sé la respuesta. Pero voy a darles mi escenario favorito. Puede que así sea. Pero no hay explicación. Son datos fríos sobre el Universo que toca aceptar sin hacer preguntas. Puede ser que el Big Bang no sea el principio del Universo. Un huevo sin abrir es una configura-ción de baja entropía y aún así, al abrir el refrigerador no decimos, “¡Ajá!, qué sorpresa encontrar esta configuración de baja entropía en mi refrigerador”. Esto es porque el huevo no es un sistema cerrado; viene de una gallina. Es posible que el Universo venga de una gallina universal. Puede ser que exista algo que, de manera natural, según el desarrollo de las leyes de la física, le dé origen a un Universo como el nuestro, con una configuración de baja entropía. Si es así, esto habría de suceder más de una vez; seríamos parte de un multiverso mucho más grande. Este es mi escenario favorito.

15:01

Pero los organizadores me pidieron que terminara con una especulación atrevida. Mi especulación audaz es que la historia me dará la razón totalmente. Y dentro de 50 años, todas mis ideas extravagantes serán aceptadas como verdaderas por la comunidad científica y por todo el mundo. Todos aceptaremos que nuestro pequeño Universo es sólo una pequeña parte de un multiverso mucho mayor. Y aún mejor, entenderemos lo que sucedió en el Big Bang en función de una teoría que podremos comparar con observaciones. Esta es mi predicción. Puedo estar equivocado. Pero la especie humana ha venido pensando por muchos, muchos años, sobre cómo es el Universo y por qué surgió de esta forma. Es emocionante pensar que finalmente podemos conocer la respuesta.

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

Comenta

*

(*) Camps obligatoris

L'enviament de comentaris implica l'acceptació de les normes d'ús