Search for alien intelligence

 

 

The story of humans is the story of ideas — scientific ideas that shine light into dark corners, ideas that we embrace rationally and irrationally, ideas for which we’ve lived and died and killed and been killed, ideas that have vanished in history, and ideas that have been set in dogma. It’s a story of nations, of ideologies, of territories, and of conflicts among them. But, every moment of human history, from the Stone Age to the Information Age, from Sumer and Babylon to the iPod and celebrity gossip, they’ve all been carried out — every book that you’ve read, every poem, every laugh, every tear — they’ve all happened here… Here. Here. Here.

(Laughter)

01:39

Perspective is a very powerful thing. Perspectives can change. Perspectives can be altered. From my perspective, we live on a fragile island of life, in a universe of possibilities. For many millennia, humans have been on a journey to find answers, answers to questions about naturalism and transcendence, about who we are and why we are, and of course, who else might be out there. Is it really just us? Are we alone in this vast universe of energy and matter and chemistry and physics? Well, if we are, it’s an awful waste of space. (Laughter) But, what if we’re not?

02:39

What if, out there, others are asking and answering similar questions? What if they look up at the night sky, at the same stars, but from the opposite side? Would the discovery of an older cultural civilization out there inspire us to find ways to survive our increasingly uncertain technological adolescence? Might it be the discovery of a distant civilization and our common cosmic origins that finally drives home the message of the bond among all humans? Whether we’re born in San Francisco, or Sudan, or close to the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, we are the products of a billion-year lineage of wandering stardust. We, all of us, are what happens when a primordial mixture of hydrogen and helium evolves for so long that it begins to ask where it came from. Fifty years ago, the journey to find answers took a different path and SETI, the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, began.

04:01

So, what exactly is SETI? Well, SETI uses the tools of astronomy to try and find evidence of someone else’s technology out there. Our own technologies are visible over interstellar distances, and theirs might be as well. It might be that some massive network of communications, or some shield against asteroidal impact, or some huge astro-engineering project that we can’t even begin to conceive of, could generate signals at radio or optical frequencies that a determined program of searching might detect. For millennia, we’ve actually turned to the priests and the philosophers for guidance and instruction on this question of whether there’s intelligent life out there. Now, we can use the tools of the 21st century to try and observe what is, rather than ask what should be, believed.

04:57

SETI doesn’t presume the existence of extra terrestrial intelligence; it merely notes the possibility, if not the probability in this vast universe, which seems fairly uniform. The numbers suggest a universe of possibilities. Our sun is one of 400 billion stars in our galaxy, and we know that many other stars have planetary systems. We’ve discovered over 350 in the last 14 years, including the small planet, announced earlier this week, which has a radius just twice the size of the Earth. And, if even all of the planetary systems in our galaxy were devoid of life, there are still 100 billion other galaxies out there, altogether 10^22 stars. Now, I’m going to try a trick, and recreate an experiment from this morning. Remember, one billion? But, this time not one billion dollars, one billion stars. Alright, one billion stars. Now, up there, 20 feet above the stage, that’s 10 trillion. Well, what about 10^22? Where’s the line that marks that? That line would have to be 3.8 million miles above this stage. (Laughter) 16 times farther away than the moon, or four percent of the distance to the sun.

06:28

So, there are many possibilities. (Laughter) And much of this vast universe, much more may be habitable than we once thought, as we study extremophiles on Earth — organisms that can live in conditions totally inhospitable for us, in the hot, high pressure thermal vents at the bottom of the ocean, frozen in ice, in boiling battery acid, in the cooling waters of nuclear reactors. These extremophiles tell us that life may exist in many other environments.

07:07

But those environments are going to be widely spaced in this universe. Even our nearest star, the Sun — its emissions suffer the tyranny of light speed. It takes a full eight minutes for its radiation to reach us. And the nearest star is 4.2 light years away, which means its light takes 4.2 years to get here. And the edge of our galaxy is 75,000 light years away, and the nearest galaxy to us, 2.5 million light years. That means any signal we detect would have started its journey a long time ago. And a signal would give us a glimpse of their past, not their present. Which is why Phil Morrison calls SETI, “the archaeology of the future.” It tells us about their past, but detection of a signal tells us it’s possible for us to have a long future.

08:06

I think this is what David Deutsch meant in 2005, when he ended his Oxford TEDTalk by saying he had two principles he’d like to share for living, and he would like to carve them on stone tablets. The first is that problems are inevitable. The second is that problems are soluble. So, ultimately what’s going to determine the success or failure of SETI is the longevity of technologies, and the mean distance between technologies in the cosmos — distance over space and distance over time. If technologies don’t last and persist, we will not succeed. And we’re a very young technology in an old galaxy, and we don’t yet know whether it’s possible for technologies to persist.

 

09:04

So, up until now I’ve been talking to you about really large numbers. Let me talk about a relatively small number. And that’s the length of time that the Earth was lifeless. Zircons that are mined in the Jack Hills of western Australia, zircons taken from the Jack Hills of western Australia tell us that within a few hundred million years of the origin of the planet there was abundant water and perhaps even life. So, our planet has spent the vast majority of its 4.56 billion year history developing life, not anticipating its emergence. Life happened very quickly, and that bodes well for the potential of life elsewhere in the cosmos.

 

09:57

And the other thing that one should take away from this chart is the very narrow range of time over which humans can claim to be the dominant intelligence on the planet. It’s only the last few hundred thousand years modern humans have been pursuing technology and civilization. So, one needs a very deep appreciation of the diversity and incredible scale of life on this planet as the first step in preparing to make contact with life elsewhere in the cosmos.

 

10:35

We are not the pinnacle of evolution. We are not the determined product of billions of years of evolutionary plotting and planning. We are one outcome of a continuing adaptational process. We are residents of one small planet in a corner of the Milky Way galaxy. And Homo sapiens are one small leaf on a very extensive Tree of Life, which is densely populated by organisms that have been honed for survival over millions of years. We misuse language, and talk about the “ascent” of man. We understand the scientific basis for the interrelatedness of life but our ego hasn’t caught up yet. So this “ascent” of man, pinnacle of evolution, has got to go. It’s a sense of privilege that the natural universe doesn’t share.

 

11:50

Loren Eiseley has said, “One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human.” One day that eye may be that of an intelligent alien, and the sooner we eschew our narrow view of evolution the sooner we can truly explore our ultimate origins and destinations.

 

12:20

We are a small part of the story of cosmic evolution, and we are going to be responsible for our continued participation in that story, and perhaps SETI will help as well. Occasionally, throughout history, this concept of this very large cosmic perspective comes to the surface, and as a result we see transformative and profound discoveries. So in 1543, Nicholas Copernicus published “The Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres,” and by taking the Earth out of the center, and putting the sun in the center of the solar system, he opened our eyes to a much larger universe, of which we are just a small part. And that Copernican revolution continues today to influence science and philosophy and technology and theology.

 

13:23

So, in 1959, Giuseppe Coccone and Philip Morrison published the first SETI article in a refereed journal, and brought SETI into the scientific mainstream. And in 1960, Frank Drake conducted the first SETI observation looking at two stars, Tau Ceti and Epsilon Eridani, for about 150 hours. Now Drake did not discover extraterrestrial intelligence, but he learned a very valuable lesson from a passing aircraft, and that’s that terrestrial technology can interfere with the search for extraterrestrial technology.

 

14:00

We’ve been searching ever since, but it’s impossible to overstate the magnitude of the search that remains. All of the concerted SETI efforts, over the last 40-some years, are equivalent to scooping a single glass of water from the oceans. And no one would decide that the ocean was without fish on the basis of one glass of water. The 21st century now allows us to build bigger glasses — much bigger glasses. In Northern California, we’re beginning to take observations with the first 42 telescopes of the Allen Telescope Array — and I’ve got to take a moment right now to publicly thank Paul Allen and Nathan Myhrvold and all the Team SETI members in the TED community who have so generously supported this research. (Applause)

 

15:00

The ATA is the first telescope built from a large number of small dishes, and hooked together with computers. It’s making silicon as important as aluminum, and we’ll grow it in the future by adding more antennas to reach 350 for more sensitivity and leveraging Moore’s law for more processing capability. Today, our signal detection algorithms can find very simple artifacts and noise. If you look very hard here you can see the signal from the Voyager 1 spacecraft, the most distant human object in the universe, 106 times as far away from us as the sun is. And over those long distances, its signal is very faint when it reaches us. It may be hard for your eye to see it, but it’s easily found with our efficient algorithms. But this is a simple signal, and tomorrow we want to be able to find more complex signals.

 

15:56

This is a very good year. 2009 is the 400th anniversary of Galileo’s first use of the telescope, Darwin’s 200th birthday, the 150th anniversary of the publication of “On the Origin of Species,” the 50th anniversary of SETI as a science, the 25th anniversary of the incorporation of the SETI Institute as a non-profit, and of course, the 25th anniversary of TED. And next month, the Kepler Spacecraft will launch and will begin to tell us just how frequent Earth-like planets are, the targets for SETI’s searches.In 2009, the U.N. has declared it to be the International Year of Astronomy, a global festival to help us residents of Earth rediscover our cosmic origins and our place in the universe. And in 2009, change has come to Washington, with a promise to put science in its rightful position. (Applause)

 

17:01

So, what would change everything? Well, this is the question the Edge foundation asked this year, and four of the respondents said, “SETI.” Why? Well, to quote: “The discovery of intelligent life beyond Earth would eradicate the loneliness and solipsism that has plagued our species since its inception. And it wouldn’t simply change everything, it would change everything all at once.” So, if that’s right, why did we only capture four out of those 151 minds? I think it’s a problem of completion and delivery,because the fine print said, “What game-changing ideas and scientific developments would you expect to live to see?” So, we have a fulfillment problem. We need bigger glasses and more hands in the water, and then working together, maybe we can all live to see the detection of the first extraterrestrial signal.

 

17:59

That brings me to my wish. I wish that you would empower Earthlings everywhere to become active participants in the ultimate search for cosmic company.

 

18:15

The first step would be to tap into the global brain trust, to build an environment where raw data could be stored, and where it could be accessed and manipulated, where new algorithms could be developed and old algorithms made more efficient. And this is a technically creative challenge, and it would change the perspective of people who worked on it. And then, we’d like to augment the automated search with human insight. We’d like to use the pattern recognition capability of the human eye to find faint, complex signals that our current algorithms miss.

 

18:59

And, of course, we’d like to inspire and engage the next generation. We’d like to take the materials that we have built for education, and get them out to students everywhere, students that can’t come and visit us at the ATA. We’d like to tell our story better, and engage young people, and thereby change their perspective.

 

19:23

I’m sorry Seth Godin, but over the millennia, we’ve seen where tribalism leads. We’ve seen what happens when we divide an already small planet into smaller islands. And, ultimately, we actually all belong to only one tribe, to Earthlings. And SETI is a mirror — a mirror that can show us ourselves from an extraordinary perspective, and can help to trivialize the differences among us. If SETI does nothing but change the perspective of humans on this planet, then it will be one of the most profound endeavors in history.

20:06

So, in the opening days of 2009, a visionary president stood on the steps of the U.S. Capitol and said, “We cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass, that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve, that, as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself.” So, I look forward to working with the TED community to hear about your ideas about how to fulfill this wish, and in collaborating with you, hasten the day that that visionary statement can become a reality.

20:45

Thank you. (Applause)

La historia de la humanidad es la historia de las ideas — ideas científicas que iluminan los rincones oscuros, ideas que abrazamos de manera racional e irracional, ideas por las cuales vivimos y morimos, hemos y nos han asesinado, ideas que se han desvanecido en la historia, e ideas que se han convertido en dogmas. Es una historia de naciones, de ideologías, de territorios, y de conflictos entre ellos, Pero, cada momento de la historia humana, desde la edad de piedra hasta la era de la información, desde los Sumerios y Babilonia hasta el iPod y los chismes de celebridades todas han sido realizadas – cada libro que han leído, cada poema, cada risa, cada lágrima, todos han ocurrido aquí… Aquí. Aquí. Aquí. (risas)

01:39

La perspectiva es una cosa poderosa. La perspectiva puede cambiar. La perspectiva puede ser alterada. desde mi perspectiva, vivimos en una frágil isla de vida, en un universo de posibilidades. Por muchos milenios, los humanos han realizado una travesía para encontrar respuestas, respuestas a preguntas sobre el naturalismo y la transcendencia acerca de quiénes somos y por qué estamos aquí, y por supuesto, quién más podría estar allí afuera ¿En verdad somos sólo nosotros? ¿Estamos solos en este vasto Universo de energía y materia, química y física? Bueno, de ser así, sería un terrible desperdicio de espacio. (Risas) Pero, ¿Y si no estamos solos?

02:39

¿Qué si, allí afuera, otros se están preguntando y respondiendo las mismas preguntas? ¿Qué si ellos miran al cielo de noche, a las mismas estrellas, pero desde el lado contrario? ¿El descubrimiento de una civilización cultural más vieja allí afuera nos inspiraría a buscar maneras de sobrevivir nuestra creciente incierta adolescencia tecnológica? ¿Podría el descubrimiento de una civilización lejana y nuestros orígenes cósmicos comunes lo que traiga finalmente a nuestro hogar el mensaje de unión entre los humanos? Aún cuando hayamos nacido en San Francisco, o en Sudan, o muy cerca del corazón de la de la galaxia de la Vía Láctea, somos el producto de un linaje de miles de millones de años de errante de polvo de estrellas. Nosotros, todos nosotros, somos un resultado de una mezcla primordial de hidrógeno y helio que evolucionó durante tanto tiempo que comienzo a preguntarse sobre sus orígenes. Hace cincuenta años, La travesía para encontrar respuestas tomó un camino diferente y SETI, la Búsqueda de Inteligencia Extraterrestre, comenzó.

04:01

Entonces, ¿Qué es exactamente SETI? Bueno, SETI usa las herramientas de la astronomía para tratar de encontrar evidencia de tecnología de alguien más, allí afuera. Nuestras propias tecnologías son visibles a través de distancias interestelares, y las de ellos también lo podrían ser. Podría ser que alguna red masiva de comunicaciones, o algún escudo contra impactos de asteroides, o algún gran proyecto de astro ingeniería que ni siquiera hayamos comenzado a concebir, podría enviar señales a frecuencias ópticas o de radio que un programa determinado de búsqueda podría detectar. Por milenios, acudimos a los sacerdotes y a los filósofos para guía e instrucción en esta cuestión de si hay vida inteligente allá afuera. Ahora, podemos usar las herramientas del siglo 21 y tratar de observar lo que es antes que preguntar lo que deberíamos creer.

04:57

SETI no presume la existencia de inteligencia extraterrestre, sólo denota la posibilidad, o probabilidad en este vasto Universo, el cual parece bastante uniforme. Los números sugieren un universo de posibilidades. Nuestro Sol es una de entre 400 mil millones de estrellas en nuestra galaxia, y sabemos que muchas de estas estrellas tienen sistemas planetarios, hemos descubierto más de 350 en los últimos 14 años, incluyendo el pequeño planeta, anunciado la semana pasada, el cual tiene un radio que es justo dos veces el tamaño de la Tierra. Y, si todos los sistemas planetarios de nuestra galaxia no tuvieran vida, todavía hay 100 mil millones de otras galaxias allí afuera, en total 10 elevado a 22 estrellas. Ahora, voy a tratar de realizar un truco, y recrear un experimento de esta mañana. ¿Recuerdan, mil millones? Pero, esta vez no son mil millones de dólares, son mil millones de estrellas. Muy bien, mil millones de estrellas. Ahora, arriba a 20 pies por encima del escenario, esos son 10 billones. Bien, y que del 10 elevado a la 22? ¿Dónde está la línea que marca eso? esa línea tendría que tener 3.8 millones de millas por encima del escenario. (Risas) 16 veces más lejos que la Luna, o 4 por ciento de la distancia al Sol.

06:28

Así, que hay muchas posibilidades. (Risas) Y mucho de este vasto Universo, mucho más podría ser habitable de lo que pensamos un día, mientras estudiamos extremófilos en la Tierra– organismos que pueden vivir en condiciones inhóspitas para nosotros, en el calor y presión de ventanas termales en el fondo del océano, congeladas en hielo, en ácido de batería hirviente, en las aguas que enfrían los reactores nucleares. Estos extremófilos nos indican que la vida puede existir en muchos otros ambientes.

07:07

Pero esos ambientes van a estar separados ampliamente en este Universo. Aún, nuestra estrella más cercana, el Sol, sus emisiones sufren de la tiranía de la velocidad de la luz. Toma unos 8 minutos completos para que nos llegue su radiación. Y la estrella más cercana está a 4.2 años luz, lo que significa que a su luz tarda 4.2 años en llegar aquí. Y el extremo de la galaxia está a 75 000 años luz. Y la galaxia más cercana está a 2.5 millones de años luz. Lo que quiere decir que cualquier señal que detectemos habrá comenzado su viaje mucho tiempo atrás. Y una señal nos brindaría un destello de su pasado, no de su presente. Es por eso que Phil Morrison llama a SETI, “la arqueología del futuro”. Nos cuenta acerca de su pasado, pero la detección de una señal nos dice que es posible que tengamos un largo futuro.

08:06

Creo que esto era lo que quería decir David Deutsch en el 2005, cuando terminó su charla TED en Oxford al decir que tenía dos principios que le gustaría compartir, y que le gustaría tallarlas en tablas de piedra El primero es que los problemas son inevitables. El segundo es que los problemas pueden ser resueltos así, que lo que en definitiva va a determinar el éxito o fracaso de SETI es la longevidad de las tecnologías, y la distancia media entre las tecnologías en el cosmos — la distancia en espacio y distancia en tiempo. Si las tecnologías no duran y persisten, no tendremos éxito. Y somos una tecnología muy joven en una galaxia vieja, y no sabemos aún si será posible que las tecnologías persistan.

09:04

Entonces, hasta ahora les he estado hablando de grandes cantidades déjenme hablarle ahora de cantidades relativamente pequeñas Y esa es la cantidad de tiempo que la Tierra estuvo sin vida. Si vemos las zirconias que son extraídas de las minas de Jack Hills en el occidente de Australia, Las zirconias de Jack Hills en el occidente de Australia Nos indican que en unos pocos cientos de millones de años del origen de nuestro planeta había abundante agua y quizás vida también. Así, que nuestro planeta ha pasado la gran mayoría de sus 4 mil 560 millones de años de historia desarrollando vida, sin anticipar su aparición. La vida ocurrió muy rápido, y eso predice muy bien el potencial de vida en algún lugar del cosmos

09:57

y otra cosa que se debe destacar es el breve rango de tiempo en que los humanos pueden proclamarse como la inteligencia dominante en el planeta Es solamente en los últimos pocos cientos de años que los humanos modernos han estado desarrollando la tecnología y la civilización entonces, necesitamos apreciar profundamente la diversidad e increíble escala de la vida en este planeta como primer paso en prepararse a hacer contacto con vida en otros lugares del cosmos

10:35

No somos el pináculo de la evolución. No somos el producto determinado de miles de millones de años de planeación Somos el resultado de un continuo proceso de adaptación Somos residentes de un pequeño planeta en una esquina de la galaxia de la Vía Láctea El Homo sapiens es una pequeña hoja en un muy extenso Árbol de la Vida, que está densamente poblado por organismos que han sobrevivido durante millones de años. Usamos de manera errónea el lenguaje, al referirnos al “ascenso del hombre”. Comprendemos la base científica de la interrelación de la vida pero nuestro ego aún no lo comprende. Entonces el ascenso del hombre, el pináculo de la evolución, tiene que desaparecer. Es un sentido de privilegio que el universo natural no comparte.

11:50

Loren Eiseley ha dicho, que “Uno no se conoce a sí mismo hasta que ve el propio reflejo en un ojo distinto del humano”. Un día ese ojo podría ser el de un extraterrestre inteligente, y mientras más pronto ampliemos nuestra idea de la evolución más pronto podremos explorar verdaderamente los orígenes y destinos últimos.

12:20

Somos sólo un fragmento en la historia de la evolución cósmica, y seremos responsables por nuestra continua participación en esa historia, y quizás SETI pueda ayudar. Ocasionalmente, a través de la historia, el concepto de esta gran perspectiva cósmica sale a la superficie, y como resultado podemos ver descubrimientos profundos y transformadores. En 1543, Nicolás Copérnico publicó “Las revoluciones de las esferas celestes”, sacando a la Tierra del centro, y poniendo al Sol en el centro del Sistema Solar, Él abrió nuestros ojos a un universo mucho más grande, de cual somos una pequeña parte. Y la revolución copernicana continúa hasta la fecha para influenciar la ciencia y filosofía y tecnología y teología.

13:23

Entonces en 1959, Giuseppe Coccone y Philip Morrison publicaron el primer artículo SETI en una publicación arbitrada, y trajeron a SETI dentro de la corriente científica. Y en 1960, Frank Drake realizó la primera observación SETI al observar dos estrellas, Tau Ceti y Epsilo Eridani, durante 150 horas. Ahora Drake no encontró inteligencia extraterrestre, pero aprendió una lección muy valiosa por el paso de una aeronave, y es que la tecnología terrestre puede interferir con la búsqueda de tecnología extraterrestre.

14:00

Hemos estado buscando desde entonces, pero es imposible exagerar la magnitud de la búsqueda que falta. Todos los esfuerzos relacionados con SETI, durante los últimos 40 años, son equivalentes a revisar un solo vaso de agua de los océanos. Y nadie podría decidir que el océano no tiene peces con base en un sólo vaso de agua. El siglo 21 nos permite construir vasos más grandes, vasos mucho más grandes. En el norte de California, hemos comenzado a hacer observaciones con los primeros 42 telescopios del Conjunto de Telescopios Allen (ATA)– y tomaré un momento para agradecer públicamente a Paul Allen y Nathan Myhrvold y todos los miembros del Equipo SETI en la comunidad TED que generosamente han apoyado esta investigación (Aplausos)

15:00

El ATA es el primer telescopio construido con un gran número de pequeños platos, enlazados mediante computadoras. Esto hace al silicio tan importante como el aluminio, y lo haremos crecer agregando más antenas hasta que sean 350 incrementando la sensibilidad y elevando la Ley de Moore para mayor capacidad de procesamiento. Actualmente, nuestros algoritmos de detección de señales pueden fácilmente encontrar artefactos y ruido Si observan con atención podrán ver la señal de la sonda Voyager 1, el objeto humano más distante en el Universo, 106 veces más lejos de nosotros que el Sol. Y a tan largas distancias, su señal es muy débil cuando llega a nosotros. Puedes ser difícil para sus ojos verla, pero es fácil de encontrar con nuestros eficientes algoritmos. Pero esta es una señal sencilla, y mañana desearemos encontrar señales más complejas.

15:56

Este es un año muy bueno. En 2009 se cumplen 400 años de la primera observación de Galileo con un telescopio, Del nacimiento de Darwin, 200 años, El 150 aniversario de la publicación de “El Origen de las Especies”, el 50 aniversario de SETI como una ciencia, el 25 aniversario de la incorporación del Instituto SETI como organización sin ánimo de lucro y por supuesto, el 25 aniversario de TED. El próximo mes, la sonda Kepler será lanzada y comenzará a decirnos qué tan frecuentes son los planetas parecidos a la Tierra, los objetivos para búsquedas SETI. En 2009, la O.N.U ha declarado que éste sea el Año Internacional de la Astronomía, un festejo mundial que nos ayudará a los residentes de la Tierra a re-descubrir nuestros orígenes cósmicos y nuestro lugar en el Universo. Y en 2009, el cambio ha llegado a Washington, con la promesa de poner la ciencia en el lugar que le corresponde. (Aplausos)

17:01

Entonces ¿Qué lo cambiaría todo? Bueno, esta es la pregunta que la fundación Edge hizo este año, y cuatro de los que respondieron dijeron, “SETI”. ¿Por qué? Bueno, cito: “El descubrimiento de vida inteligente más allá de la Tierra erradicaría la soledad y el solipsismo que ha plagado nuestra especie desde el comienzo. Y no solamente lo cambiaría todo, lo cambiaría todo al mismo tiempo”. Entonces, de ser correcto ¿Por qué solo capturamos cuatro de esas 151 mentes? Pienso que el problema es de término y entrega, porque la letra pequeña dice, “¿Qué ideas transformadoras y desarrollos científicos usted esperaría vivir para ver?” Entonces, tenemos un problema de cumplimiento Necesitamos vasos más grandes y más manos en el agua, y entonces, trabajando juntos, quizás podamos todos vivir para ver la detección de la primera señal extraterrestre.

17:59

Lo que me lleva a mi deseo. Deseo que ustedes puedan empoderar a los terrícolas en todo lugar para que se vuelvan participantes activos en la búsqueda final de compañía cósmica.

18:15

El primer paso sería explotar el impulso cerebral global, para construir un ambiente donde los datos sin procesar puedan almacenarse y donde puedan ser accesados y manipulados, donde nuevos algoritmos puedan desarrollarse y los viejos algoritmos se hagan más eficientes. Y este es un reto técnicamente creativo, y podría cambiar la perspectiva de las personas que trabajen en ello. Y entonces, nos gustaría aumentar la búsqueda automatizada con entendimiento humano. Nos gustaría usar la capacidad de reconocimiento de patrones que tiene el ojo humano para encontrar señales débiles y complejas, que escapan a nuestros actuales algoritmos.

18:59

Y por supuesto, queremos inspirar a la siguiente generación. Nos gustaría tomar el material que hemos desarrollado para la educación, y proporcionarlas a estudiantes de todas partes, estudiantes que no pueden venir a visitarnos en el ATA. Nos gustaría narrar mejor nuestra historia, y captar a los jóvenes, y por lo tanto, cambiar sus perspectivas.

19:23

Lo lamento Seth Godin, pero durante milenios hemos visto a dónde nos lleva ser tribales. Hemos visto lo que ocurre cuando dividimos un pequeño planeta en islas más pequeñas. Y, finalmente, todos pertenecemos a una sola tribu, los terrícolas. Y SETI es un espejo, un espejo que puede mostrarles a ustedes mismos desde una perspectiva extraordinaria, y puede ayudar a trivializar las diferencias entre nosotros. Si SETI no hiciera nada más que cambiar la perspectiva de los humanos en este planeta, entonces será una de las empresas más profundas en la historia.

20:06

Así pues en los primeros días de 2009, un presidente visionario puso pié en el Capitolio de los E.U.A. y dijo “No podemos evitar creer que los viejos odios algún día se olvidarán, que las fronteras entre tribus pronto desaparecerán, esto, conforme se empequeñece el mundo, revelará nuestra humanidad común”. Así que espero con emoción trabajar con la comunidad TED para escuchar sus ideas sobre cómo realizar este deseo, y en la colaboración con ustedes, se acercará el día en que el visionario enunciado podrá ser una realidad.

20:45

Gracias (Aplausos)

Comenta

*

(*) Camps obligatoris

L'enviament de comentaris implica l'acceptació de les normes d'ús