Quantum entanglement

 

TRANSCRIPTION Translated by Lidia Cámara de la Fuente

Reviewed by Sebastian Betti

I’d like to introduce you to an emerging area of science, one that is still speculative but hugely exciting, and certainly one that’s growing very rapidly. Quantum biology asks a very simple question: Does quantum mechanics — that weird and wonderful and powerful theory of the subatomic world of atoms and molecules that underpins so much of modern physics and chemistry — also play a role inside the living cell? In other words: Are there processes, mechanisms, phenomena in living organisms that can only be explained with a helping hand from quantum mechanics? Now, quantum biology isn’t new; it’s been around since the early 1930s. But it’s only in the last decade or so that careful experiments — in biochemistry labs, using spectroscopy — have shown very clear, firm evidence that there are certain specific mechanisms that require quantum mechanics to explain them.

 

01:17

Quantum biology brings together quantum physicists, biochemists, molecular biologists — it’s a very interdisciplinary field. I come from quantum physics, so I’m a nuclear physicist.

 

01:28

I’ve spent more than three decades trying to get my head around quantum mechanics. One of the founders of quantum mechanics, Niels Bohr, said, If you’re not astonished by it, then you haven’t understood it. So I sort of feel happy that I’m still astonished by it. That’s a good thing. But it means I study the very smallest structures in the universe — the building blocks of reality. If we think about the scale of size, start with an everyday object like the tennis ball, and just go down orders of magnitude in size — from the eye of a needle down to a cell, down to a bacterium, down to an enzyme — you eventually reach the nano-world.

 

02:09

Now, nanotechnology may be a term you’ve heard of. A nanometer is a billionth of a meter. My area is the atomic nucleus, which is the tiny dot inside an atom. It’s even smaller in scale. This is the domain of quantum mechanics, and physicists and chemists have had a long time to try and get used to it. Biologists, on the other hand, have got off lightly, in my view. They are very happy with their balls-and-sticks models of molecules.

 

(Laughter)

 

 

02:39

The balls are the atoms, the sticks are the bonds between the atoms. And when they can’t build them physically in the lab, nowadays, they have very powerful computers that will simulate a huge molecule. This is a protein made up of 100,000 atoms. It doesn’t really require much in the way of quantum mechanics to explain it. Quantum mechanics was developed in the 1920s. It is a set of beautiful and powerful mathematical rules and ideas that explain the world of the very small. And it’s a world that’s very different from our everyday world, made up of trillions of atoms. It’s a world built on probability and chance. It’s a fuzzy world. It’s a world of phantoms, where particles can also behave like spread-out waves.

 

03:30

If we imagine quantum mechanics or quantum physics, then, as the fundamental foundation of reality itself, then it’s not surprising that we say quantum physics underpins organic chemistry. After all, it gives us the rules that tell us how the atoms fit together to make organic molecules. Organic chemistry, scaled up in complexity, gives us molecular biology, which of course leads to life itself. So in a way, it’s sort of not surprising. It’s almost trivial. You say, “Well, of course life ultimately must depend of quantum mechanics.” But so does everything else. So does all inanimate matter, made up of trillions of atoms.

 

04:08

Ultimately, there’s a quantum level where we have to delve into this weirdness. But in everyday life, we can forget about it. Because once you put together trillions of atoms, that quantum weirdness just dissolves away. Quantum biology isn’t about this. Quantum biology isn’t this obvious. Of course quantum mechanics underpins life at some molecular level. Quantum biology is about looking for the non-trivial — the counterintuitive ideas in quantum mechanics — and to see if they do, indeed, play an important role in describing the processes of life.

 

04:54

Here is my perfect example of the counterintuitiveness of the quantum world. This is the quantum skier. He seems to be intact, he seems to be perfectly healthy, and yet, he seems to have gone around both sides of that tree at the same time. Well, if you saw tracks like that you’d guess it was some sort of stunt, of course. But in the quantum world, this happens all the time. Particles can multitask, they can be in two places at once. They can do more than one thing at the same time. Particles can behave like spread-out waves. It’s almost like magic.

 

05:27

Physicists and chemists have had nearly a century of trying to get used to this weirdness. I don’t blame the biologists for not having to or wanting to learn quantum mechanics.

 

05:37

You see, this weirdness is very delicate; and we physicists work very hard to maintain it in our labs. We cool our system down to near absolute zero, we carry out our experiments in vacuums, we try and isolate it from any external disturbance. That’s very different from the warm, messy, noisy environment of a living cell. Biology itself, if you think of molecular biology, seems to have done very well in describing all the processes of life in terms of chemistry — chemical reactions. And these are reductionist, deterministic chemical reactions, showing that, essentially, life is made of the same stuff as everything else, and if we can forget about quantum mechanics in the macro world, then we should be able to forget about it in biology, as well.

 

06:27

Well, one man begged to differ with this idea. Erwin Schrödinger, of Schrödinger’s Cat fame, was an Austrian physicist. He was one of the founders of quantum mechanics in the 1920s. In 1944, he wrote a book called “What is Life?” It was tremendously influential. It influenced Francis Crick and James Watson, the discoverers of the double-helix structure of DNA. To paraphrase a description in the book, he says: At the molecular level, living organisms have a certain order, a structure to them that’s very different from the random thermodynamic jostling of atoms and molecules in inanimate matter of the same complexity.

 

07:13

In fact, living matter seems to behave in this order, in a structure, just like inanimate matter cooled down to near absolute zero, where quantum effects play a very important role. There’s something special about the structure — the order — inside a living cell. So, Schrödinger speculated that maybe quantum mechanics plays a role in life. It’s a very speculative, far-reaching idea, and it didn’t really go very far.

 

07:45

But as I mentioned at the start, in the last 10 years, there have been experiments emerging, showing where some of these certain phenomena in biology do seem to require quantum mechanics.

 

07:55

I want to share with you just a few of the exciting ones. This is one of the best-known phenomena in the quantum world, quantum tunneling. The box on the left shows the wavelike, spread-out distribution of a quantum entity — a particle, like an electron, which is not a little ball bouncing off a wall. It’s a wave that has a certain probability of being able to permeate through a solid wall, like a phantom leaping through to the other side. You can see a faint smudge of light in the right-hand box. Quantum tunneling suggests that a particle can hit an impenetrable barrier, and yet somehow, as though by magic, disappear from one side and reappear on the other. The nicest way of explaining it is if you want to throw a ball over a wall, you have to give it enough energy to get over the top of the wall. In the quantum world, you don’t have to throw it over the wall, you can throw it at the wall, and there’s a certain non-zero probability that it’ll disappear on your side, and reappear on the other.

 

08:57

This isn’t speculation, by the way. We’re happy — well, “happy” is not the right word —

 

(Laughter)

 

we are familiar with this.

 

09:06

(Laughter)

 

09:09

Quantum tunneling takes place all the time; in fact, it’s the reason our Sun shines. The particles fuse together, and the Sun turns hydrogen into helium through quantum tunneling. Back in the 70s and 80s, it was discovered that quantum tunneling also takes place inside living cells. Enzymes, those workhorses of life, the catalysts of chemical reactions — enzymes are biomolecules that speed up chemical reactions in living cells, by many, many orders of magnitude. And it’s always been a mystery how they do this.

 

09:43

Well, it was discovered that one of the tricks that enzymes have evolved to make use of, is by transferring subatomic particles, like electrons and indeed protons, from one part of a molecule to another via quantum tunneling. It’s efficient, it’s fast, it can disappear — a proton can disappear from one place, and reappear on the other. Enzymes help this take place.

 

10:08

This is research that’s been carried out back in the 80s, particularly by a group in Berkeley, Judith Klinman. Other groups in the UK have now also confirmed that enzymes really do this.

 

10:21

Research carried out by my group — so as I mentioned, I’m a nuclear physicist, but I’ve realized I’ve got these tools of using quantum mechanics in atomic nuclei, and so can apply those tools in other areas as well. One question we asked is whether quantum tunneling plays a role in mutations in DNA. Again, this is not a new idea; it goes all the way back to the early 60s. The two strands of DNA, the double-helix structure, are held together by rungs; it’s like a twisted ladder. And those rungs of the ladder are hydrogen bonds — protons, that act as the glue between the two strands. So if you zoom in, what they’re doing is holding these large molecules — nucleotides — together. Zoom in a bit more. So, this a computer simulation. The two white balls in the middle are protons, and you can see that it’s a double hydrogen bond. One prefers to sit on one side; the other, on the other side of the two strands of the vertical lines going down, which you can’t see. It can happen that these two protons can hop over. Watch the two white balls. They can jump over to the other side. If the two strands of DNA then separate, leading to the process of replication, and the two protons are in the wrong positions, this can lead to a mutation.

 

11:43

This has been known for half a century. The question is: How likely are they to do that, and if they do, how do they do it? Do they jump across, like the ball going over the wall? Or can they quantum-tunnel across, even if they don’t have enough energy? Early indications suggest that quantum tunneling can play a role here. We still don’t know yet how important it is; this is still an open question. It’s speculative, but it’s one of those questions that is so important that if quantum mechanics plays a role in mutations, surely this must have big implications, to understand certain types of mutations, possibly even those that lead to turning a cell cancerous.

 

12:22

Another example of quantum mechanics in biology is quantum coherence, in one of the most important processes in biology, photosynthesis: plants and bacteria taking sunlight, and using that energy to create biomass. Quantum coherence is the idea of quantum entities multitasking. It’s the quantum skier. It’s an object that behaves like a wave, so that it doesn’t just move in one direction or the other, but can follow multiple pathways at the same time.

 

12:54

Some years ago, the world of science was shocked when a paper was published showing experimental evidence that quantum coherence takes place inside bacteria, carrying out photosynthesis. The idea is that the photon, the particle of light, the sunlight, the quantum of light captured by a chlorophyll molecule, is then delivered to what’s called the reaction center, where it can be turned into chemical energy. And in getting there, it doesn’t just follow one route; it follows multiple pathways at once, to optimize the most efficient way of reaching the reaction center without dissipating as waste heat. Quantum coherence taking place inside a living cell. A remarkable idea, and yet evidence is growing almost weekly, with new papers coming out, confirming that this does indeed take place.

 

13:45

My third and final example is the most beautiful, wonderful idea. It’s also still very speculative, but I have to share it with you. The European robin migrates from Scandinavia down to the Mediterranean, every autumn, and like a lot of other marine animals and even insects, they navigate by sensing the Earth’s magnetic field. Now, the Earth’s magnetic field is very, very weak; it’s 100 times weaker than a fridge magnet, and yet it affects the chemistry — somehow — within a living organism. That’s not in doubt — a German couple of ornithologists, Wolfgang and Roswitha Wiltschko, in the 1970s, confirmed that indeed, the robin does find its way by somehow sensing the Earth’s magnetic field, to give it directional information — a built-in compass.

 

14:37

The puzzle, the mystery was: How does it do it? Well, the only theory in town — we don’t know if it’s the correct theory, but the only theory in town — is that it does it via something called quantum entanglement. Inside the robin’s retina — I kid you not — inside the robin’s retina is a protein called cryptochrome, which is light-sensitive. Within cryptochrome, a pair of electrons are quantum-entangled. Now, quantum entanglement is when two particles are far apart, and yet somehow remain in contact with each other. Even Einstein hated this idea; he called it “spooky action at a distance.”

 

15:12

(Laughter)

 

15:14

So if Einstein doesn’t like it, then we can all be uncomfortable with it. Two quantum-entangled electrons within a single molecule dance a delicate dance that is very sensitive to the direction the bird flies in the Earth’s magnetic field.

 

15:26

We don’t know if it’s the correct explanation, but wow, wouldn’t it be exciting if quantum mechanics helps birds navigate? Quantum biology is still in it infancy. It’s still speculative. But I believe it’s built on solid science. I also think that in the coming decade or so, we’re going to start to see that actually, it pervades life — that life has evolved tricks that utilize the quantum world. Watch this space.

Thank you.

(Applause)

Me gustaría presentarles un área emergente de la ciencia, que sigue siendo especulativa, pero muy emocionante, y, sin duda, un área que está creciendo muy rápidamente. La biología cuántica plantea una pregunta muy simple: ¿Juega la mecánica cuántica –esa teoría extraña, maravillosa y potente del mundo subatómico de átomos y moléculas que sustenta gran parte de la física moderna y la química— también un papel en el interior de la célula viva? En otras palabras: ¿Existen procesos, mecanismos, fenómenos, en los organismos vivos que solo pueden explicarse con ayuda de la mecánica cuántica? La biología cuántica no es nueva; ha estado presente desde la década de 1930. Pero solo en la última década más o menos los experimentos minuciosos, en laboratorios de bioquímica, usando espectroscopia, han mostrado clara y firme evidencia de que hay ciertos mecanismos específicos que requieren de la mecánica cuántica para que puedan explicarse.

 

01:17

La biología cuántica reúne a los físicos cuánticos, bioquímicos, biólogos moleculares… es un campo muy interdisciplinario. Vengo de la física cuántica, así que soy físico nuclear.

 

01:28

He pasado más de tres décadas tratando de entender la mecánica cuántica. Uno de los fundadores de la mecánica cuántica, Niels Bohr, dijo: Si Ud. no está asombrado por ella, entonces no la ha entendido. Así que me satisface estar todavía asombrado por ella. Eso es bueno. Pero significa que estudio estructuras muy pequeñas del universo, los bloques de construcción de la realidad. Si pensamos en la escala de tamaños, comienza con un objeto cotidiano como la pelota de tenis, y acaba con órdenes de gran magnitud de tamaño: desde el ojo de una aguja hasta la célula, la bacteria y la enzima, para llegar, finalmente, al nanomundo.

 

02:10

Puede que hayan oído hablar de la nanotecnología. Un nanómetro es la mil millonésima parte de un metro. Mi área es el núcleo atómico, el pequeño punto dentro de un átomo. Es incluso más pequeño en escala. Este es el dominio de la mecánica cuántica, y los físicos y los químicos han tenido mucho tiempo para tratar de acostumbrarse a él. Los biólogos, por el contrario, lo han tratado a la ligera, en mi opinión. Ellos están muy contentos con sus modelos de moléculas de bolas y palillos

 

(Risas)

 

02:39

Las bolas son los átomos, los palillos los enlaces entre los átomos. Y cuando no pueden construirlos físicamente en el laboratorio, hoy en día, tienen computadoras muy potentes que simularán una molécula enorme. Esta es una proteína formada por 100 000 átomos. No precisa mucho que la mecánica cuántica se lo explique. La mecánica cuántica se desarrolló en la década de 1920. Es un conjunto de reglas e ideas matemáticas bellas y poderosas que explican el mundo de lo muy pequeño. Y es un mundo muy diferente a nuestro mundo cotidiano, compuesto por miles de millones de átomos. Es un mundo construido sobre la probabilidad y posibilidad. Es un mundo difuso. Es un mundo de fantasmas, donde las partículas también se pueden comportar como ondas de propagación.

 

03:30

Si imaginamos la mecánica cuántica o la física cuántica, como la base fundamental de la realidad misma, entonces no es extraño que digamos que la física cuántica sustenta la química orgánica. Después de todo, da las reglas que dictan cómo los átomos se unen para formar moléculas orgánicas. La química orgánica, ampliada en la complejidad, nos da la biología molecular, que por supuesto lleva a la vida misma. Así que en cierto modo, no es una sorpresa. Es casi trivial: uno dice: “En última instancia, la vida depende de la mecánica cuántica”. Pero lo mismo ocurre con todo lo demás. También lo hace toda la materia inanimada,

 

04:07

formada por miles de millones de átomos. En última instancia, hay un nivel cuántico donde tenemos que profundizar en esta rareza. Pero en la vida cotidiana, podemos olvidarlo. Porque una vez que juntas billones de átomos, la rareza cuántica simplemente se disuelve. La biología cuántica no trata de esto. La biología cuántica no es tan obvia. Claro, la mecánica cuántica sustenta la vida en algún nivel molecular. La biología cuántica trata de buscar lo no trivial, las ideas contraintuitivas en la mecánica cuántica… y al observar si lo hacen, ciertamente, juegan un papel importante en la descripción de los procesos de la vida.

 

04:54

Este es mi ejemplo perfecto de la contraintuitividad del mundo cuántico. Es el esquiador cuántico. Parece intacto, y perfectamente sano, y, sin embargo, parece que ha bordeado ambos lados de ese árbol al mismo tiempo. Bueno, si vieron pistas como esas se imaginarán que es un truco, por supuesto. Pero en el mundo cuántico, esto sucede todo el tiempo. Las partículas pueden ser multitarea, pueden estar en dos lugares a la vez. Pueden hacer más de una cosa a la vez. Las partículas pueden comportarse como ondas de propagación. Es casi como magia.

 

05:27

Los físicos y químicos han tenido casi un siglo para acostumbrarse a esta rareza. No culpo a los biólogos por no haber podido o querido aprender mecánica cuántica.

 

05:37

Esta rareza es muy delicada; y los físicos trabajamos arduamente para mantenerlo en nuestros laboratorios. Enfriamos nuestro sistema hasta cerca del cero absoluto, llevamos a cabo experimentos en el vacío, tratamos de aislarlos de cualquier perturbación externa. Muy diferente al ambiente cálido, desordenado y ruidoso de una célula viva. La biología en sí misma, si piensan en la biología molecular, parece haber funcionado muy bien describiendo todos los procesos de la vida en términos químicos, como reacciones químicas. Y estas son las reacciones químicas reduccionistas, deterministas, que muestran que, en esencia, la vida está hecha de la misma materia que todo lo demás, y si podemos olvidarnos de la mecánica cuántica en el mundo macro, entonces deberíamos poder olvidarnos de él en la biología, también.

 

06:27

Bueno, un hombre no estuvo de acuerdo con esta idea. Erwin Schrödinger, del famoso gato de Schrödinger, fue un físico austríaco. Uno de los fundadores de la mecánica cuántica en la década de 1920. En 1944, escribió un libro titulado: “¿Qué es la vida?” Tuvo una tremenda influencia. Influyó en Francis Crick y en James Watson, descubridores de la estructura de doble hélice del ADN. Parafraseando una descripción en el libro, dice: A nivel molecular, los organismos vivos tienen un cierto orden, una estructura para ellos que es muy diferente de los empujones termodinámicos aleatorios de átomos y moléculas existente en la materia inanimada de la misma complejidad.

 

07:13

De hecho, la materia viva parece comportarse en este orden, en una estructura, al igual que la materia inanimada se enfría hasta cerca del cero absoluto, donde los efectos cuánticos juegan un papel muy importante. Hay algo especial acerca de la estructura, del orden en el interior de una célula viva. Así, Schrödinger especuló con que la mecánica cuántica, tal vez, jugara un papel en la vida. Es una idea muy especulativa de largo alcance, y, en realidad, no llegó muy lejos.

 

07:45

Pero, como ya dije al principio, en los últimos 10 años, han surgido experimentos, que evidencian que algunos fenómenos en biología parecen requerir de la mecánica cuántica.

 

07:55

Quiero compartirles algunos de los más emocionantes. Este es uno de los fenómenos más conocidos en el mundo cuántico, el túnel cuántico. A la izquierda de la pared se muestra el paquete de ondas, que extiende una entidad cuántica, una partícula, como un electrón, que no es una pequeña pelota que rebota en una pared. Es una onda que tiene una cierta probabilidad de permear a través de una pared sólida, como un fantasma que la atraviesa hasta el otro lado. Se ve una mancha tenue de luz en la parte derecha. El túnel cuántico sugiere que una partícula puede golpear una barrera impenetrable, y, sin embargo, de algún modo, como por arte de magia, desaparece de un lado y reaparece en el otro. La forma más bonita de explicarlo es que si quieren lanzar una pelota a una pared, hay que darle con la energía suficiente para alcanzar la parte superior de la pared. En el mundo cuántico, no hay que lanzarla por encima del muro, se puede lanzar a la pared, con una cierta probabilidad distinta de cero de que desaparezca de su lado, y aparezca en el otro.

 

08:57

Esto no es especulación, por cierto. Estamos felices, bueno “felices” no es la palabra correcta,

 

(Risas) estamos familiarizados con esto.

 

(Risas)

 

09:09

El túnel cuántico tiene lugar todo el tiempo; de hecho, es la razón de que nuestro Sol brille. Las partículas se funden, y el Sol convierte hidrógeno en helio a través del túnel cuántico. Ya en los años 70 y 80, se descubrió que el efecto túnel cuántico también ocurre en el interior de las células. Las enzimas, los caballos de batalla de la vida, los catalizadores de las reacciones químicas, son biomoléculas que aceleran las reacciones químicas en las células vivas, en muchos órdenes de magnitud. Y siempre ha sido un misterio cómo lo hacen.

 

09:43

Bueno, se descubrió que uno de los trucos es que las enzimas han evolucionado para usarlo mediante la transferencia de partículas subatómicas, como los electrones y, de hecho, los protones, de una parte de una molécula a otra a través del túnel cuántico. Es eficiente, es rápido, puede desaparecer, un protón puede desaparecer de un lugar y reaparecer en otro. Las enzimas ayudan a que esto suceda.

 

10:08

Esta es una investigación llevada a cabo en los 80, por un grupo de Berkeley, Judith Klinman. Otros grupos en el Reino Unido han confirmado ahora también que las enzimas realmente lo hacen.

 

10:20

La investigación realizada por mi grupo… como he dicho, soy físico nuclear, y sé que tengo estas herramientas para utilizar la mecánica cuántica en los núcleos atómicos, por eso puedo aplicar también esas herramientas en otras áreas. Una pregunta que nos hacíamos es si el túnel cuántico juega un papel en las mutaciones del ADN. Esto no es una idea nueva, se remonta a los años 60. Las dos hebras de ADN, la estructura de doble hélice, se mantienen unidas por travesaños, como una escalera retorcida. Y los peldaños de la escalera son enlaces de hidrógeno, protones, que actúan como pegamento entre las dos cadenas. Si nos acercamos, lo que hacen es mantener estas grandes moléculas, nucleótidos, juntas. Acercándonos un poco más. Esta una simulación informática. Las dos bolas blancas del medio son los protones, y se ve que se trata de un enlace de hidrógeno doble. Uno prefiere sentarse en un lado; el otro, en el otro lado de las dos hebras de las líneas de abajo verticales, que no se pueden ver. Puede suceder que estos dos protones puedan saltar por encima. Miren las dos bolas blancas. Pueden saltar hacia el otro lado. Si ambas hebras de ADN se separan, lo que lleva al proceso de replicación, y los dos protones están en posiciones erróneas, esto puede conducir a una mutación.

 

11:43

Esto se sabe desde hace medio siglo. La pregunta es: ¿Cuán probable es que lo hagan? Y si lo hacen, ¿cómo lo hacen? ¿Saltan al otro lado, como la pelota que va por encima del muro? ¿O pueden traspasarlo por el efecto de túnel cuántico incluso si no tienen suficiente energía? Las primeras indicaciones sugieren que el efecto túnel cuántico puede jugar un papel aquí. Todavía no sabemos cuán importante es; esto es todavía una cuestión abierta. Es especulativa, pero es una de esas preguntas muy importantes, pues si la mecánica cuántica desempeña un papel en las mutaciones, sin duda esto tiene grandes implicaciones, para entender ciertos tipos de mutaciones, posiblemente, incluso las que llevan a convertir a una célula en cancerosa.

 

12:22

Otro ejemplo de la mecánica cuántica en la biología es la coherencia cuántica, en uno de los procesos más importantes en la biología, la fotosíntesis: plantas y bacterias que obtienen luz solar, y usan esa energía para crear biomasa. la coherencia cuántica es la idea de que las entidades cuánticas son multitarea. Es el esquiador cuántico. Es un objeto que se comporta como una onda, de modo que no solo se mueve en una dirección u otra, sino que puede seguir múltiples caminos al mismo tiempo.

 

12:54

Hace algunos años, el mundo de la ciencia se sorprendió cuando se publicó un artículo que muestra la evidencia experimental de que la coherencia cuántica sucede dentro de las bacterias, cuando ocurre la fotosíntesis. La idea es que el fotón, la partícula de la luz, la luz del sol, el quantum de luz es captado por una molécula de clorofila, para luego dar lo que se llama el centro de reacción, donde puede convertirse en energía química. Y llegando ahí, no solo sigue una vía; sino múltiples vías a la vez, para optimizar la forma más eficaz de alcanzar el centro de reacción sin disiparse como calor residual. La coherencia cuántica ocurre dentro de una célula viva. Una idea notable y, además, la evidencia crece cada semana, con nuevos documentos que confirman que esto es así.

 

13:45

Mi tercer y último ejemplo es la idea más hermosa y maravillosa. También es todavía muy especulativa, pero quiero compartirla con Uds. El petirrojo europeo migra desde Escandinavia hasta el Mediterráneo, cada otoño, y como muchos animales marinos e incluso insectos, navegan al detectar el campo magnético de la Tierra. El campo magnético de la Tierra es muy, muy débil; 100 veces más débil que un imán de refrigerador, pero afecta a la química, de alguna manera, dentro de un organismo vivo. Eso no se cuestiona. Una pareja de alemanes ornitólogos, Wolfgang y Roswitha Wiltschko, en los 70, confirmaron que el petirrojo encuentra su camino mediante una forma de detección del campo magnético de la Tierra, que les da información direccional… una brújula incorporada.

 

14:37

El enigma, el misterio era: ¿Cómo lo hace? Bueno, la única teoría, no sabemos si es la teoría correcta, pero es la única teoría, es que lo hace a través del entrelazamiento cuántico. Dentro de la retina del petirrojo, no bromeo, dentro de la retina del petirrojo hay una proteína llamada criptocromo sensible a la luz. Dentro del criptocromo, unos electrones están enredados cuánticamente. El entrelazamiento cuántico es cuando dos partículas están muy separadas, y sin embargo permanecen en contacto entre sí. Incluso Einstein odiaba esta idea; la llamó “acción fantasmal a distancia”.

 

15:12

(Risas)

 

15:14

Y si a Einstein no le gustaba, todos podemos estar incómodos con ello. Dos electrones cuánticos entrelazados dentro de una sola molécula bailan una danza delicada muy sensible a la dirección en la que vuelan las aves en el campo magnético de la Tierra.

 

15:26

No sabemos si es la explicación correcta, pero guau, ¿no sería emocionante si la mecánica cuántica ayudara a las aves a navegar? La biología cuántica está todavía en pañales. Sigue siendo especulativa. Pero creo que se basa en un fundamento científico sólido. También creo que en la próxima década, empezaremos a ver, en realidad, lo que impregna la vida, que la vida ha desarrollado trucos que utiliza del mundo cuántico. Miren este espacio.

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

Comenta

*

(*) Camps obligatoris

L'enviament de comentaris implica l'acceptació de les normes d'ús