Arxiu de la categoria ‘General’

Betty and Barney Hill Star Map

dijous, 13/12/2018

Astronomer Tabetha Boyajian

dijous, 6/12/2018

TED  | February 2016

 

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and it is my job, my responsibility, as an astronomer to remind people that alien hypotheses should always be a last resort.Now, I want to tell you a story about that. It involves data from a NASA mission, ordinary people and one of the most extraordinary stars in our galaxy.
00:41
It began in 2009 with the launch of NASA’s Kepler mission. Kepler’s main scientific objective was to find planets outside of our solar system. It did this by staring at a single field in the sky, this one, with all the tiny boxes. And in this one field, it monitored the brightness of over 150,000 stars continuously for four years, taking a data point every 30 minutes. It was looking for what astronomers call a transit.This is when the planet’s orbit is aligned in our line of sight, just so that the planet crosses in front of a star. And when this happens, it blocks out a tiny bit of starlight, which you can see as a dip in this curve.
And so the team at NASA had developed very sophisticated computers to search for transits in all the Kepler data.At the same time of the first data release, astronomers at Yale were wondering an interesting thing:What if computers missed something?
01:53
And so we launched the citizen science project called Planet Hunters to have people look at the same data. The human brain has an amazing ability for pattern recognition, sometimes even better than a computer. However, there was a lot of skepticism around this. My colleague, Debra Fischer, founder of the Planet Hunters project, said that people at the time were saying, “You’re crazy. There’s no way that a computer will miss a signal.” And so it was on, the classic human versus machine gamble. And if we found one planet, we would be thrilled. When I joined the team four years ago, we had already found a couple. And today, with the help of over 300,000 science enthusiasts, we have found dozens, and we’ve also found one of the most mysterious stars in our galaxy.02:45
So to understand this, let me show you what a normal transit in Kepler data looks like. On this graph on the left-hand side you have the amount of light, and on the bottom is time. The white line is light just from the star, what astronomers call a light curve. Now, when a planet transits a star, it blocks out a little bit of this light, and the depth of this transit reflects the size of the object itself. And so, for example, let’s take Jupiter. Planets don’t get much bigger than Jupiter. Jupiter will make a one percent drop in a star’s brightness. Earth, on the other hand, is 11 times smaller than Jupiter, and the signal is barely visible in the data.03:26
So back to our mystery. A few years ago, Planet Hunters were sifting through data looking for transits, and they spotted a mysterious signal coming from the star KIC 8462852. The observations in May of 2009 were the first they spotted, and they started talking about this in the discussion forums.

They said and object like Jupiter would make a drop like this in the star’s light, but they were also saying it was giant. You see, transits normally only last for a few hours, and this one lasted for almost a week.

04:01
They were also saying that it looks asymmetric, meaning that instead of the clean, U-shaped dip that we saw with Jupiter, it had this strange slope that you can see on the left side. This seemed to indicatethat whatever was getting in the way and blocking the starlight was not circular like a planet. There are few more dips that happened, but for a couple of years, it was pretty quiet.

04:26
And then in March of 2011, we see this. The star’s light drops by a whole 15 percent, and this is huge compared to a planet, which would only make a one percent drop. We described this feature as both smooth and clean. It also is asymmetric, having a gradual dimming that lasts almost a week, and then it snaps right back up to normal in just a matter of days.

04:52
And again, after this, not much happens until February of 2013. Things start to get really crazy. There is a huge complex of dips in the light curve that appear, and they last for like a hundred days, all the way up into the Kepler mission’s end. These dips have variable shapes. Some are very sharp, and some are broad, and they also have variable durations. Some last just for a day or two, and some for more than a week. And there’s also up and down trends within some of these dips, almost like several independent events were superimposed on top of each other. And at this time, this star drops in its brightness over 20 percent. This means that whatever is blocking its light has an area of over 1,000 times the area of our planet Earth.

05:46
This is truly remarkable. And so the citizen scientists, when they saw this, they notified the science team that they found something weird enough that it might be worth following up. And so when the science team looked at it, we’re like, “Yeah, there’s probably just something wrong with the data.” But we looked really, really, really hard, and the data were good. And so what was happening had to be astrophysical, meaning that something in space was getting in the way and blocking starlight. And so at this point, we set out to learn everything we could about the star to see if we could find any clues to what was going on. And the citizen scientists who helped us in this discovery, they joined along for the ride watching science in action firsthand.

06:37
First, somebody said, you know, what if this star was very young and it still had the cloud of material it was born from surrounding it. And then somebody else said, well, what if the star had already formed planets, and two of these planets had collided, similar to the Earth-Moon forming event. Well, both of these theories could explain part of the data, but the difficulties were that the star showed no signs of being young, and there was no glow from any of the material that was heated up by the star’s light,and you would expect this if the star was young or if there was a collision and a lot of dust was produced. And so somebody else said, well, how about a huge swarm of comets that are passing by this star in a very elliptical orbit? Well, it ends up that this is actually consistent with our observations.But I agree, it does feel a little contrived. You see, it would take hundreds of comets to reproduce what we’re observing. And these are only the comets that happen to pass between us and the star. And so in reality, we’re talking thousands to tens of thousands of comets. But of all the bad ideas we had, this one was the best. And so we went ahead and published our findings.

08:00

Now, let me tell you, this was one of the hardest papers I ever wrote. Scientists are meant to publish results, and this situation was far from that. And so we decided to give it a catchy title, and we called it: “Where’s The Flux?” I will let you work out the acronym.

(Laughter)

08:22
So this isn’t the end of the story. Around the same time I was writing this paper, I met with a colleague of mine, Jason Wright, and he was also writing a paper on Kepler data. And he was saying that with Kepler’s extreme precision, it could actually detect alien megastructures around stars, but it didn’t. And then I showed him this weird data that our citizen scientists had found, and he said to me, “Aw crap, Tabby. Now I have to rewrite my paper.”

08:54
So yes, the natural explanations were weak, and we were curious now. So we had to find a way to rule out aliens. So together, we convinced a colleague of ours who works on SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, that this would be an extraordinary target to pursue. We wrote a proposal to observe the star with the world’s largest radio telescope at the Green Bank Observatory.

09:21

A couple months later, news of this proposal got leaked to the press and now there are thousands of articles, over 10,000 articles, on this star alone. And if you search Google Images, this is what you’ll find.

09:39

Now, you may be wondering, OK, Tabby, well, how do aliens actually explain this light curve? OK, well, imagine a civilization that’s much more advanced than our own. In this hypothetical circumstance, this civilization would have exhausted the energy supply of their home planet, so where could they get more energy? Well, they have a host star just like we have a sun, and so if they were able to capture more energy from this star, then that would solve their energy needs. So they would go and build huge structures. These giant megastructures, like ginormous solar panels, are called Dyson spheres.

10:22

This image above are lots of artists’ impressions of Dyson spheres. It’s really hard to provide perspective on the vastness of these things, but you can think of it this way. The Earth-Moon distance is a quarter of a million miles. The simplest element on one of these structures is 100 times that size. They’re enormous. And now imagine one of these structures in motion around a star. You can see how it would produce anomalies in the data such as uneven, unnatural looking dips.

10:58

But it remains that even alien megastructures cannot defy the laws of physics. You see, anything that uses a lot of energy is going to produce heat, and we don’t observe this. But it could be something as simple as they’re just reradiating it away in another direction, just not at Earth.

11:23

Another idea that’s one of my personal favorites is that we had just witnessed an interplanetary space battle and the catastrophic destruction of a planet. Now, I admit that this would produce a lot of dustthat we don’t observe. But if we’re already invoking aliens in this explanation, then who is to say they didn’t efficiently clean up all this mess for recycling purposes?

(Laughter)

11:50

You can see how this quickly captures your imagination.

Well, there you have it. We’re in a situation that could unfold to be a natural phenomenon we don’t understand or an alien technology we don’t understand. Personally, as a scientist, my money is on the natural explanation. But don’t get me wrong, I do think it would be awesome to find aliens. Either way, there is something new and really interesting to discover.

12:24

So what happens next? We need to continue to observe this star to learn more about what’s happening. But professional astronomers, like me, we have limited resources for this kind of thing, and Kepler is on to a different mission.

12:39

And I’m happy to say that once again, citizen scientists have come in and saved the day. You see, this time, amateur astronomers with their backyard telescopes stepped up immediately and started observing this star nightly at their own facilities, and I am so excited to see what they find.

13:03

What’s amazing to me is that this star would have never been found by computers because we just weren’t looking for something like this. And what’s more exciting is that there’s more data to come.There are new missions that are coming up that are observing millions more stars all over the sky.

And just think: What will it mean when we find another star like this? And what will it mean if we don’t find another star like this?

 

Thank you.

(Applause)

Las afirmaciones extraordinarias requieren pruebas extraordinarias, y es mi trabajo, mi responsabilidad, como astrónoma, recordar a la gente que las hipótesis extraterrestres siempre deben ser el último recurso.Quiero contar una historia al respecto. Esta incluye datos de una misión de la NASA, gente común y una de las estrellas más extraordinarios en nuestra galaxia.
00:41
Se inició en 2009 con el lanzamiento de la misión Kepler de la NASA. El principal objetivo científico de Kepler era encontrar planetas fuera de nuestro sistema solar. Se hizo esto mirando un solo campo en el cielo, este, con todas las pequeñas cajas. Y en este un campo, se supervisó el brillo de más de 150 000 estrellas de forma continua durante cuatro años, teniendo un punto de datos cada 30 minutos.Buscaba aquello que los astrónomos llaman un tránsito. Esto es cuando la órbita del planeta está alineada en nuestra línea de visión, para que el planeta pase por delante de una estrella. Y cuando esto sucede, bloquea un poco de luz de las estrellas, que se puede ver como un baño en esta curva.
Y por eso el equipo de la NASA ha desarrollado equipos muy sofisticados para buscar tránsitos de todos los datos de Kepler.Al mismo tiempo de la primera publicación de los datos, los astrónomos de la Universidad de Yale se preguntaban algo interesante: ¿Qué pasa si las computadoras perdieron algo?
01:52
Por eso se inició el proyecto de ciencia ciudadana llamada cazadores de planetas para incorporar a gente observando los mismos datos. El cerebro humano tiene una capacidad asombrosa para reconocer patrones, a veces incluso mejor que una computadora. Sin embargo, había mucho escepticismo al respecto. Mi colega, Debra Fischer, fundadora del proyecto Planet Hunters, dijo que la gente entonces decía: “Están locos. No es posible que una computadora pierda una señal. Y así continuó el clásico juego de azar humano contra la máquina. Y si encontramos un planeta, estaríamos encantados. Cuando me uní al equipo hace cuatro años, ya habíamos encontrado una pareja. Y hoy, con la ayuda de más de 300 000 entusiastas de la ciencia, hemos encontrado docenas, y también hemos encontrado una de las estrellas más misteriosas en nuestra galaxia.
02:45
Así que para entender esto, les enseñaré cómo es un tránsito normal en los datos de Kepler. En este gráfico en el lado izquierdo representa la cantidad de luz, y en el fondo es el tiempo. La línea blanca es la luz solo de la estrella, lo que los astrónomos llaman una curva de luz. Al transitar un planeta por una estrella, bloquea un poco de esta luz, y la profundidad de este tránsito refleja el tamaño del objeto en sí. Y así, por ejemplo, tomemos Júpiter. Los planetas no llegan a ser mucho más grandes que Júpiter. Júpiter disminuiria del 1 % el brillo de una estrella. La Tierra, por otra parte, es 11 veces más pequeña que Júpiter, y la señal es apenas visible en los datos.
Así que de vuelta a nuestro misterio. Hace unos años los cazadores de planetas depurando datos en busca de tránsitos, vieron a una misteriosa señal procedente de la estrella KIC 8462852. Las observaciones en mayo de 2009 fueron las primeras, y empezaron a hablar de esto en los foros de discusión.Decían que un objeto igual que Júpiter haría una caída como esta a la luz de la estrella, pero también se decía que era gigante. Los tránsitos normalmente solo duran unas pocas horas, y este se prolongó durante casi una semana.

04:01
También decían que se ve asimétrica, que significa que en vez de limpieza por inmersión en forma de U como en Júpiter, tenía esta extraña pendiente que se puede ver en el lado izquierdo. Esto parecía indicar que todo lo que estaba en el camino y que bloqueaba la luz de las estrellas no era circular como un planeta. Surgieron unas cuantas lagunas, pero hace un par de años, todo estaba bastante tranquilo.

04:26
Y luego, en marzo del 2011, vemos esto: gotas de luz de la estrella caen en un 15 %, y esto es enorme en comparación con un planeta, que solo haría un descenso del 1 %. Hemos descrito esta característica como algo suave y limpio. También es asimétrica, con una atenuación gradual que dura casi una semana, y que luego vuelve a encajarse con normalidad en solo cuestión de días.

04:52
Y de nuevo, después de esto, no sucede gran cosa hasta febrero de 2013. Las cosas empiezan a ser realmente de locos. Hay un enorme complejo de pequeñas caídas en la curva de luz que aparecen, y duran unos 100 días, todo el tiempo hasta el final de la misión Kepler. Estas caídas tienen formas diversas. Algunas son muy afiladas, y otras son anchas, y también tienen duraciones variables.Algunas duran solo un día o dos, otras más de una semana. Y también hay tendencias hacia arriba y abajo en algunas de estas caídas, como si superpusieran varios eventos independientes. Y en este momento, esta estrella cae en su brillo más del 20 %. Esto significa que todo lo que bloquea su luztiene una superficie de más de 1000 veces la superficie de nuestro planeta Tierra.

05:46
Esto es verdaderamente notable. Y por lo que los científicos voluntarios, al ver esto, notificaron al equipo científico que encontraron algo bastante raro que podría valer la pena hacer un seguimiento. Y así, cuando el equipo científico lo observó, pensamos: “Sí, es probable que haya algo malo con los datos”. Pero nos parecía muy, muy, muy difícil, y los datos eran buenos. Y así lo que estaba pasando tenía que ser astrofísico, lo que significa que algo en el espacio estaba en el camino bloqueando la luz estelar. Y así, en este punto, empezamos a aprender todo lo posible sobre la estrella para poder encontrar pistas sobre lo que estaba ocurriendo. Y los científicos ciudadanos que nos han ayudado en este descubrimiento, se unieron a lo largo del paseo viendo la ciencia en acción en primera persona.

06:37
En primer lugar, alguien dijo: ¿y si esta estrella era muy joven y todavía tenía alrededor la nube de material de la que nace? Y entonces otro dijo: ¿qué pasaría si la estrella tuviera planetas ya formados,y dos de estos planetas hubieran colisionado, similar a la formación de la Tierra-Luna. Pues bien, estas dos teorías podrían explicar parte de los datos, pero las dificultades eran que la estrella no parecía ser joven, y no había resplandor de cualquiera de los materiales que se calentaban por la luz de la estrella, y que se puede esperar, si la estrella era joven o si hubo una colisión y se produjo una gran cantidad de polvo. Y así que alguien más ha dicho, ¿Y si hay un enorme enjambre de cometaspasando por esta estrella en una órbita muy elíptica? Esto realmente es consistente con nuestras observaciones. Pero estoy de acuerdo, parece algo artificial. Se necesitarían cientos de cometas para reproducir lo que observamos. Y estos son solo los cometas que pasan entre nosotros y la estrella. Y así, en realidad, estamos hablando de miles a decenas de miles de cometas. Pero de todas las malas ideas que teníamos, esta fue la mejor. Y así seguimos adelante y publicamos nuestros hallazgos.

08:00

Este fue uno de los artículos más difíciles que he escrito. Se supone que los científicos deben publicar resultados, y esta situación estaba lejos de eso. Por eso decidimos darle un título atractivo, y lo llamamos: “¿Dónde está el flujo?” Voy a dejar que Uds. resuelvan el acrónimo.

(Risas)

08:22
Pero esto no es el final de la historia. Casi al mismo tiempo que yo escribía este artículo, me encontré con un colega mío, Jason Wright, que también estaba escribiendo un artículo sobre datos de Kepler. Y decía que con la extrema precisión de Kepler, podría detectar megaestructuras alienígenas alrededor de las estrellas, pero no fue así. Le mostré los datos que los voluntarios científicos habían encontrado,y me dijo: “Tonterías, Tabby. Ahora tengo que reescribir mi artículo”.

08:54
Así que sí, las explicaciones naturales eran débiles, y ahora teníamos curiosidad. Así que tuvimos que encontrar una manera de descartar alienígenas. Así que juntos, convencimos a un colega nuestro que trabaja en SETI, la búsqueda de inteligencia extraterrestre, que este sería un objetivo extraordinario para perseguir. Escribimos una propuesta para observar la estrella con el mayor radiotelescopio del mundo en el Observatorio de Green Bank.

09:21

Un par de meses más tarde, la noticia de esta propuesta se filtró a la prensa y ahora hay miles de artículos, más de 10 000 artículos sobre esta estrella sola. Y si se busca Google, se encontrará esto.

09:39

Ahora, podrían preguntar: “Bien, Tabby, así ¿cómo se explican los alienígenas esta curva la luz?”Bueno, imaginen una civilización mucho más avanzada que la nuestra. En este caso hipotético, esa civilización habría agotado la energía de su planeta de origen, Entonces, ¿dónde podrían obtener más energía? Ellos tienen una estrella madre al igual que nosotros tenemos el sol, y si fuesen capaces de capturar más energía de esta estrella, entonces eso resolvería sus necesidades energéticas. Así que irían y construirían estructuras enormes. Estos gigantes, megaestructuras como los paneles solares descomunales, se denominan esferas de Dyson.

10:21

Esta imagen de arriba contiene un montón de impresiones artísticas de las esferas de Dyson. Es muy difícil ofrecer una perspectiva sobre la inmensidad de estas cosas, pero se puede pensar de esta manera. La distancia Tierra-Luna es de unos 400 000 km. El elemento más simple en una de estas estructuras es 100 veces ese tamaño. Son enormes. Ahora imaginen una de estas estructuras en movimiento alrededor de una estrella. Se puede ver cómo se produciría anomalías en los datos como, por ejemplo, disminuciones irregulares, poco naturales .

10:58

Pero lo cierto es que incluso las megaestructuras exóticas no pueden desafiar las leyes de la física.Cualquier cosa que usa gran cantidad de energía produce calor, pero eso no observamos. Pero podría ser algo tan simple como que están irradiando en otra dirección, no hacia la Tierra.

11:23

Otra idea que es una de mis favoritas es que hemos sido testigos de una batalla en el espacio interplanetario y de la destrucción catastrófica de un planeta. Ahora, admito que esto produciría una gran cantidad de polvo que no se observa. Pero si invocamos a alienígenas en esta explicación,entonces ¿quién puede decir que no limpiaron eficientemente todo para reciclar?

(Risas)

11:50

Se puede ver cómo esto rápidamente capta su imaginación.

Bueno, ahí lo tienen. Estamos en una situación que podría revelarse como un fenómeno natural que no entendemos o una tecnología alienígena que no entendemos. En lo personal, como científica, voy por la explicación natural. Pero no me malinterpreten, creo que sería increíble encontrar extraterrestres. De cualquier manera, siempre hay algo nuevo e interesante para descubrir.

12:24

Entonces, ¿qué pasa después? Tenemos que seguir observando esta estrella para aprender más sobre lo que pasa. Pero los astrónomos profesionales como yo, tenemos recursos limitados para este tipo de cosas, y Kepler está en una misión diferente.

12:39

Y estoy feliz de decir que, una vez más, los ciudadanos científicos han entrado y salvado el día. En esta ocasión, astrónomos aficionados con sus telescopios caseros intensificaron y comenzaron a observar esta estrella nocturna en sus propias instalaciones, y estoy muy emocionada de ver lo que encuentran.

13:03

Me sorprende que esta estrella nunca fue detectada por las computadoras porque simplemente no buscábamos algo así. Y lo que es más emocionante es que hay más datos en el futuro. Hay nuevas misiones que están surgiendo que están observando a millones de estrellas por todo el cielo.

Y piensen: ¿Qué significará cuando nos topemos con otra estrella de esta manera? Y ¿qué significa si no encontramos otra estrella de esta manera?

Gracias.
(Aplausos)

… muy, muy ordinario! —SUPREMACISME—

dimecres, 5/12/2018

Tan ordinario como que, en este contexto:

“El exrector de la URJC ha asegurado que “el Trabajo de Fin de Máster no era obligatorio”.

Y que  el exdirector del Instituto de Derecho Público de la URJC se ha negado a declarar (no se sap si per ignorància o vergonya).

https://www.lavanguardia.com/politica/20180802/451191634414/pablo-casado-pp-master-polemica.html

El que no jutgen els jutges es queda sense jutjar?

New senses for humans

divendres, 16/11/2018

 David Eagleman  | Can we create new senses for humans?

As humans, we can perceive less than a ten-trillionth of all light waves. “Our experience of reality,” says neuroscientist David Eagleman, “is constrained by our biology.” He wants to change that. His research into our brain processes has led him to create new interfaces to take in previously unseen information about the world around us.

We are built out of very small stuff, and we are embedded in a very large cosmos, and the fact is that we are not very good at understanding reality at either of those scales, and that’s because our brains haven’t evolved to understand the world at that scale.
00:32
Instead, we’re trapped on this very thin slice of perception right in the middle. But it gets strange, because even at that slice of reality that we call home, we’re not seeing most of the action that’s going on. So take the colors of our world. This is light waves, electromagnetic radiation that bounces off objects and it hits specialized receptors in the back of our eyes. But we’re not seeing all the waves out there. In fact, what we see is less than a 10 trillionth of what’s out there. So you have radio waves and microwaves and X-rays and gamma rays passing through your body right now and you’re completely unaware of it, because you don’t come with the proper biological receptors for picking it up. There are thousands of cell phone conversations passing through you right now, and you’re utterly blind to it. Now, it’s not that these things are inherently unseeable.
Snakes include some infrared in their reality, and honeybees include ultraviolet in their view of the world, and of course we build machines in the dashboards of our cars to pick up on signals in the radio frequency range, and we built machines in hospitals to pick up on the X-ray range. But you can’t sense any of those by yourself, at least not yet, because you don’t come equipped with the proper sensors.
01:59
Now, what this means is that our experience of reality is constrained by our biology, and that goes against the common sense notion that our eyes and our ears and our fingertips are just picking up the objective reality that’s out there. Instead, our brains are sampling just a little bit of the world.
02:22
Now, across the animal kingdom, different animals pick up on different parts of reality. So in the blind and deaf world of the tick, the important signals are temperature and butyric acid; in the world of the black ghost knifefish, its sensory world is lavishly colored by electrical fields; and for the echolocating bat, its reality is constructed out of air compression waves. That’s the slice of their ecosystem that they can pick up on, and we have a word for this in science. It’s called the umwelt, which is the German word for the surrounding world. Now, presumably, every animal assumes that its umwelt is the entire objective reality out there, because why would you ever stop to imagine that there’s something beyond what we can sense. Instead, what we all do is we accept reality as it’s presented to us.
03:19
Let’s do a consciousness-raiser on this. Imagine that you are a bloodhound dog. Your whole world is about smelling. You’ve got a long snout that has 200 million scent receptors in it, and you have wet nostrils that attract and trap scent molecules, and your nostrils even have slits so you can take big nosefuls of air. Everything is about smell for you. So one day, you stop in your tracks with a revelation. You look at your human owner and you think, “What is it like to have the pitiful, impoverished nose of a human? (Laughter) What is it like when you take a feeble little noseful of air? How can you not know that there’s a cat 100 yards away, or that your neighbor was on this very spot six hours ago?” (Laughter)
04:10
So because we’re humans, we’ve never experienced that world of smell, so we don’t miss it, because we are firmly settled into our umwelt. But the question is, do we have to be stuck there? So as a neuroscientist, I’m interested in the way that technology might expand our umwelt, and how that’s going to change the experience of being human.
04:38
So we already know that we can marry our technology to our biology, because there are hundreds of thousands of people walking around with artificial hearing and artificial vision. So the way this works is, you take a microphone and you digitize the signal, and you put an electrode strip directly into the inner ear. Or, with the retinal implant, you take a camera and you digitize the signal, and then you plug an electrode grid directly into the optic nerve. And as recently as 15 years ago, there were a lot of scientists who thought these technologies wouldn’t work. Why? It’s because these technologies speak the language of Silicon Valley, and it’s not exactly the same dialect as our natural biological sense organs. But the fact is that it works; the brain figures out how to use the signals just fine.
05:31
Now, how do we understand that? Well, here’s the big secret: Your brain is not hearing or seeing any of this. Your brain is locked in a vault of silence and darkness inside your skull. All it ever sees are electrochemical signals that come in along different data cables, and this is all it has to work with, and nothing more. Now, amazingly, the brain is really good at taking in these signals and extracting patterns and assigning meaning, so that it takes this inner cosmos and puts together a story of this, your subjective world.
But here’s the key point: Your brain doesn’t know, and it doesn’t care, where it gets the data from. Whatever information comes in, it just figures out what to do with it. And this is a very efficient kind of machine. It’s essentially a general purpose computing device, and it just takes in everything and figures out what it’s going to do with it, and that, I think, frees up Mother Nature to tinker around with different sorts of input channels.
06:49
So I call this the P.H. model of evolution, and I don’t want to get too technical here, but P.H. stands for Potato Head, and I use this name to emphasize that all these sensors that we know and love, like our eyes and our ears and our fingertips, these are merely peripheral plug-and-play devices: You stick them in, and you’re good to go. The brain figures out what to do with the data that comes in. And when you look across the animal kingdom, you find lots of peripheral devices. So snakes have heat pits with which to detect infrared, and the ghost knifefish has electroreceptors, and the star-nosed mole has this appendage with 22 fingers on it with which it feels around and constructs a 3D model of the world, and many birds have magnetite so they can orient to the magnetic field of the planet. So what this means is that nature doesn’t have to continually redesign the brain. Instead, with the principles of brain operation established, all nature has to worry about is designing new peripherals.
08:01
Okay. So what this means is this: The lesson that surfaces is that there’s nothing really special or fundamental about the biology that we come to the table with. It’s just what we have inherited from a complex road of evolution. But it’s not what we have to stick with, and our best proof of principle of this comes from what’s called sensory substitution. And that refers to feeding information into the brain via unusual sensory channels, and the brain just figures out what to do with it.
08:35
Now, that might sound speculative, but the first paper demonstrating this was published in the journal Nature in 1969. So a scientist named Paul Bach-y-Rita put blind people in a modified dental chair, and he set up a video feed, and he put something in front of the camera, and then you would feel that poked into your back with a grid of solenoids. So if you wiggle a coffee cup in front of the camera, you’re feeling that in your back, and amazingly, blind people got pretty good at being able to determine what was in front of the camera just by feeling it in the small of their back. Now, there have been many modern incarnations of this. The sonic glasses take a video feed right in front of you and turn that into a sonic landscape, so as things move around, and get closer and farther, it sounds like “Bzz, bzz, bzz.” It sounds like a cacophony, but after several weeks, blind people start getting pretty good at understanding what’s in front of them just based on what they’re hearing. And it doesn’t have to be through the ears: this system uses an electrotactile grid on the forehead, so whatever’s in front of the video feed, you’re feeling it on your forehead. Why the forehead? Because you’re not using it for much else.
09:51
The most modern incarnation is called the brainport, and this is a little electrogrid that sits on your tongue, and the video feed gets turned into these little electrotactile signals, and blind people get so good at using this that they can throw a ball into a basket, or they can navigate complex obstacle courses. They can come to see through their tongue. Now, that sounds completely insane, right? But remember, all vision ever is is electrochemical signals coursing around in your brain. Your brain doesn’t know where the signals come from. It just figures out what to do with them.
10:34
So my interest in my lab is sensory substitution for the deaf, and this is a project I’ve undertaken with a graduate student in my lab, Scott Novich, who is spearheading this for his thesis. And here is what we wanted to do: we wanted to make it so that sound from the world gets converted in some way so that a deaf person can understand what is being said. And we wanted to do this, given the power and ubiquity of portable computing, we wanted to make sure that this would run on cell phones and tablets, and also we wanted to make this a wearable, something that you could wear under your clothing. So here’s the concept. So as I’m speaking, my sound is getting captured by the tablet, and then it’s getting mapped onto a vest that’s covered in vibratory motors, just like the motors in your cell phone. So as I’m speaking, the sound is getting translated to a pattern of vibration on the vest. Now, this is not just conceptual: this tablet is transmitting Bluetooth, and I’m wearing the vest right now. So as I’m speaking — (Applause) — the sound is getting translated into dynamic patterns of vibration. I’m feeling the sonic world around me.
12:01
So, we’ve been testing this with deaf people now, and it turns out that after just a little bit of time, people can start feeling, they can start understanding the language of the vest.
12:14
So this is Jonathan. He’s 37 years old. He has a master’s degree. He was born profoundly deaf, which means that there’s a part of his umwelt that’s unavailable to him. So we had Jonathan train with the vest for four days, two hours a day, and here he is on the fifth day.Scott Novich: You.
David Eagleman: So Scott says a word, Jonathan feels it on the vest, and he writes it on the board.
SN: Where. Where.
DE: Jonathan is able to translate this complicated pattern of vibrations into an understanding of what’s being said.
SN: Touch. Touch.
DE: Now, he’s not doing this — (Applause) — Jonathan is not doing this consciously, because the patterns are too complicated, but his brain is starting to unlock the pattern that allows it to figure out what the data mean, and our expectation is that, after wearing this for about three months, he will have a direct perceptual experience of hearing in the same way that when a blind person passes a finger over braille, the meaning comes directly off the page without any conscious intervention at all. Now, this technology has the potential to be a game-changer, because the only other solution for deafness is a cochlear implant, and that requires an invasive surgery. And this can be built for 40 times cheaper than a cochlear implant, which opens up this technology globally, even for the poorest countries.
14:00
Now, we’ve been very encouraged by our results with sensory substitution, but what we’ve been thinking a lot about is sensory addition. How could we use a technology like this to add a completely new kind of sense, to expand the human umvelt? For example, could we feed real-time data from the Internet directly into somebody’s brain, and can they develop a direct perceptual experience?
14:27
So here’s an experiment we’re doing in the lab. A subject is feeling a real-time streaming feed from the Net of data for five seconds. Then, two buttons appear, and he has to make a choice. He doesn’t know what’s going on. He makes a choice, and he gets feedback after one second. Now, here’s the thing: The subject has no idea what all the patterns mean, but we’re seeing if he gets better at figuring out which button to press. He doesn’t know that what we’re feeding is real-time data from the stock market, and he’s making buy and sell decisions. (Laughter) And the feedback is telling him whether he did the right thing or not. And what we’re seeing is, can we expand the human umvelt so that he comes to have, after several weeks, a direct perceptual experience of the economic movements of the planet. So we’ll report on that later to see how well this goes. (Laughter)
Here’s another thing we’re doing: During the talks this morning, we’ve been automatically scraping Twitter for the TED2015 hashtag, and we’ve been doing an automated sentiment analysis, which means, are people using positive words or negative words or neutral? And while this has been going on, I have been feeling this, and so I am plugged in to the aggregate emotion of thousands of people in real time, and that’s a new kind of human experience, because now I can know how everyone’s doing and how much you’re loving this. (Laughter) (Applause) It’s a bigger experience than a human can normally have.
16:11
We’re also expanding the umvelt of pilots. So in this case, the vest is streaming nine different measures from this quadcopter, so pitch and yaw and roll and orientation and heading, and that improves this pilot’s ability to fly it. It’s essentially like he’s extending his skin up there, far away.
16:33
Andl that’s just the beginning. What we’re envisioning is taking a modern cockpit full of gauges and instead of trying to read the whole thing, you feel it. We live in a world of information now, and there is a difference between accessing big data and experiencing it.
16:54
So I think there’s really no end to the possibilities on the horizon for human expansion. Just imagine an astronaut being able to feel the overall health of the International Space Station, or, for that matter, having you feel the invisible states of your own health, like your blood sugar and the state of your microbiome, or having 360-degree vision or seeing in infrared or ultraviolet.
17:23
So the key is this: As we move into the future, we’re going to increasingly be able to choose our own peripheral devices. We no longer have to wait for Mother Nature’s sensory gifts on her timescales, but instead, like any good parent, she’s given us the tools that we need to go out and define our own trajectory. So the question now is, how do you want to go out and experience your universe?Thank you.(Applause)
Chris Anderson: Can you feel it?
DE: Yeah.Actually, this was the first time I felt applause on the vest. It’s nice. It’s like a massage. (Laughter)
CA: Twitter’s going crazy. Twitter’s going mad. So that stock market experiment. This could be the first experiment that secures its funding forevermore, right, if successful?
DE: Well, that’s right, I wouldn’t have to write to NIH anymore.
CA: Well look, just to be skeptical for a minute, I mean, this is amazing, but isn’t most of the evidence so far that sensory substitution works, not necessarily that sensory addition works? I mean, isn’t it possible that the blind person can see through their tongue because the visual cortex is still there, ready to process, and that that is needed as part of it?
18:55
DE: That’s a great question. We actually have no idea what the theoretical limits are of what kind of data the brain can take in. The general story, though, is that it’s extraordinarily flexible. So when a person goes blind, what we used to call their visual cortex gets taken over by other things, by touch, by hearing, by vocabulary. So what that tells us is that the cortex is kind of a one-trick pony. It just runs certain kinds of computations on things. And when we look around at things like braille, for example, people are getting information through bumps on their fingers. So I don’t think we have any reason to think there’s a theoretical limit that we know the edge of.
19:33
CA: If this checks out, you’re going to be deluged. There are so many possible applications for this. Are you ready for this? What are you most excited about, the direction it might go?
DE: I mean, I think there’s a lot of applications here. In terms of beyond sensory substitution, the things I started mentioning about astronauts on the space station, they spend a lot of their time monitoring things, and they could instead just get what’s going on, because what this is really good for is multidimensional data. The key is this: Our visual systems are good at detecting blobs and edges, but they’re really bad at what our world has become, which is screens with lots and lots of data. We have to crawl that with our attentional systems. So this is a way of just feeling the state of something, just like the way you know the state of your body as you’re standing around. So I think heavy machinery, safety, feeling the state of a factory, of your equipment, that’s one place it’ll go right away.
CA: David Eagleman, that was one mind-blowing talk. Thank you very much.
DE: Thank you, Chris.
(Applause)
Estamos hechos de cosas muy pequeñas, e inmersos en un gran cosmos, y no entendemos bien la realidad de ninguna de esas escalas, y eso se debe a que el cerebro no ha evolucionado para entender el mundo en esa escala.
00:32
En cambio estamos atrapados justo en medio de ese delgado  tramo de percepción. Pero es extraño porque incluso en esa porción de realidad que llamamos hogar no vemos gran parte de la acción que ocurre. Veamos los colores del mundo. Se trata de ondas de luz, radiación electromagnética que rebota en los objetos y golpea receptores especializados en la parte posterior de los ojos. Pero no vemos todas las ondas que existen. De hecho, vemos menos de una diez billonésima parte de lo que existe. Hay ondas de radio, microondas rayos X y rayos gamma que atraviesan nuestros cuerpos ahora mismo y no somos conscientes de eso, porque no tenemos los receptores biológicos adecuados para detectarlos. Hay miles de conversaciones de teléfonos móviles y estamos completamente ciegos a eso. Pero no es que estas cosas sean inherentemente invisibles.
Las serpientes perciben rayos infrarrojos las abejas rayos ultravioletas, y, claro, construímos máquinas en los tableros de nuestros autos para capturar señales en el rango de frecuencias de radio, y construímos máquinas en hospitales para capturar rayos X. Pero no los podemos percibir, al menos no todavía, porque no venimos equipados con los sensores adecuados.
01:59
Esto significa que nuestra experiencia de la realidad se ve limitada por nuestra biología, y eso va en contra de la noción del sentido común de que la vista, el oído y el tacto apenas percibe la realidad objetiva circundante. En cambio, el cerebro solo percibe una pequeña parte del mundo.
02:22
Bien, en todo el reino animal, distintos animales perciben diferentes partes de la realidad. Así, en el mundo ciego y sordo de la garrapata, las señales importantes son la temperatura y el ácido butírico; en el mundo del pez cuchillo, su ambiente sensorial es profusamente coloreado por campos eléctricos; y para el murciélago su mundo está compuesto por ondas de aire comprimido. Esa es la parte del ecosistema que pueden captar, y en ciencia tenemos una palabra para esto, es “umwelt“, término alemán para denominar el mundo circundante. Al parecer los animales suponen que su umwelt es toda la realidad objetiva circundante, ya que por qué dejaríamos de imaginar que existe algo más de lo que podemos percibir. En cambio, nosotros aceptamos la realidad tal como se nos presenta.
03:19
Hagamos de esto un despertar de conciencia. Imaginen que somos un perro sabueso. Nuestro mundo gira en torno al olfato. Tenemos un morro largo con 200 millones de receptores olfativos, hocicos húmedos que atraen y atrapan moléculas de olor, y fosas nasales que tienen hendiduras para inspirar grandes cantidades de aire. Todo gira en torno al olfato. Un día tenemos una revelación. Miramos a nuestro dueño humano y pensamos: “¿Cómo debe ser tener esa lamentable nariz humana tan empobrecida? (Risas) ¿Qué se sentirá al inspirar pequeñas y débiles cantidades de aire? ¿Cómo será no saber que hay un gato a 90 m de distancia, o que tu vecino estuvo aquí mismo hace 6 horas?”(Risas)
04:10
Como somos humanos nunca hemos experimentado ese mundo del olfato, por eso no lo añoramos, porque estamos cómodos en nuestro umwelt. Pero la pregunta es, ¿debemos quedar atrapados en él? Como neurólogo, me interesa ver de qué forma la tecnología podría expandir nuestro umwelt, y cómo eso podría cambiar la experiencia de ser humano.
04:38
Ya sabemos que podemos conjugar tecnología y biología porque hay cientos de miles de personas que andan por allí con oído y vista artificiales. Eso funciona así, se pone un micrófono, se digitaliza la señal y se coloca una tira de electrodos directamente en el oído interno. O, con el implante de retina, se coloca una cámara se digitaliza la señal, y luego se enchufa una tira de electrodos directamente en el nervio óptico. Hace apenas 15 años muchos científicos pensaban que estas tecnologías no funcionarían. ¿Por qué? Estas tecnologías hablan la lengua de Silicon Valley, y esta no es exactamente la misma que la de nuestros órganos sensoriales biológicos, pero funcionan. El cerebro se las ingenia para usar las señales.
05:31
¿Cómo podemos entender eso? Este es el gran secreto. El cerebro ni oye, ni ve esto. El cerebro está encerrado en una bóveda en silencio y oscuridad en el cráneo. Solo ve señales electroquímicas que vienen en diferentes cables de datos, solo trabaja con esto, nada más. Sorprendentemente, el cerebro es muy bueno para captar estas señales extraer patrones y darle significado, así, con este cosmos interior, elabora una historia y, de ahí, nuestro mundo subjetivo.
Pero aquí está el secreto. El cerebro ni sabe, ni le importa de dónde vienen los datos. De cualquier información que llega sabe descifrar, qué hacer con ella. Es una máquina muy eficiente. Básicamente se trata de un dispositivo de computación de propósito general, sencillamente recibe todo y se da cuenta qué hacer con eso, y eso, creo yo, libera a la Madre Naturaleza para probar distintos canales de entrada.
06:49
Así que llamo a esto modelo evolutivo PH, no quiero entrar en detalles técnicos, PH significa “Potato Head” y uso este nombre para resaltar que todos estos sensores que conocemos y amamos, como la vista, el oído y el tacto, son solo dispositivos periféricos enchufables: se enchufan y funcionan. El cerebro determina qué hacer con los datos que recibe. Si analizamos el reino animal, encontramos muchos periféricos. Las serpientes tienen hoyos de calor para detectar infrarrojos, y el pez cuchillo tiene electrorreceptores, y el topo de nariz estrellada tiene este apéndice con 22 dedos con los que percibe y construye un modelo 3D del mundo, y muchas aves tienen magnetita para orientarse hacia campo magnético del planeta. Esto significa que la naturaleza no tiene que rediseñar continuamente al cerebro. En cambio, establecidos los principios de la operación del cerebro, la naturaleza solo tiene que diseñar nuevos periféricos.
08:01
Bién, esto significa lo siguiente: La lección que surge es que no hay nada realmente especial o fundamental en la biología que traemos. Es lo que hemos heredado a partir de un complejo camino evolutivo. Pero no tenemos por qué limitarnos a eso, y la mejor prueba de ese principio viene de lo que se llama “sustitución sensorial”. Se refiere a la información de entrada en el cerebro por canales sensoriales inusuales; el cerebro entiende qué hacer con ella.
08:35
Esto puede sonar a especulación, pero el primer trabajo que demuestra esto se publicó en la revista Nature en 1969. Un científico llamado Paul Bach-y-Rita puso ciegos en una silla dentada modificada, configuró un canal de video, y puso algo en frente de la cámara, para luego sentir una señal táctil en la espalda mediante una red de solenoides. Si uno mueve una taza de café frente a la cámara, uno la siente en la espalda, y, sorprendentemente, los ciegos tienen buen desempeño detectando qué hay frente a la cámara mediante vibraciones en la parte baja de la espalda. Ha habido muchas implementaciones modernas de esto. Las gafas sónicas toman un canal de video del frente y lo convierten en un paisaje sonoro, y conforme las cosas se mueven, se acercan y se alejan, hace un sonido “bzz, bzz, bzz”. Suena como una cacofonía, pero después de varias semanas, los ciegos empiezan a entender bastante bien qué tienen enfrente a partir de lo que escuchan. Y no tiene por qué ser por los oídos: este sistema usa una rejilla electrotáctil en la frente, para sentir en la frente lo que esté frente a la entrada de video, ¿Por qué la frente? Porque no se usa para mucho más.
09:51
La implementación más moderna se llama “brainport” y es una rejillita eléctrica ubicada en la lengua, la señal de video se convierte en pequeñas señales electrotáctiles, y los ciegos lo usan tan bien que pueden arrojar pelotas en una cesta, o pueden realizar carreras de obstáculos complejos. Pueden ver con la lengua. ¿Parece de locos, verdad? Pero recuerden que la visión siempre son señales electroquímicas que recorren el cerebro. El cerebro no sabe de dónde vienen las señales. Se da cuenta qué hacer con ellas.
10:34
Por eso el interés de mi laboratorio es la “sustitución sensorial” en sordos, y este es el proyecto que realizamos con un estudiante de posgrado en mi laboratorio, Scott Novich, que encabeza esto en su tesis. Esto es lo que queríamos hacer: queríamos hacerlo convirtiendo el sonido del mundo de alguna forma para que un sordo pudiera entender lo que se dice. Y queríamos hacerlo, dado el poder y ubicuidad de la informática portátil, queríamos asegurarnos de que ejecutase en teléfonos móviles y tabletas, y también queríamos hacerlo portátil, algo que pudiéramos usar debajo de la ropa. Este es el concepto. Conforme hablo, una tableta capta mi sonido, y luego es mapeado en un chaleco cubierto con motores vibratorios, como los motores de sus móviles. Conforme hablo, el sonido se traduce en patrones de vibración en el chaleco. Esto no es solo un concepto: esta tableta transmite vía Bluetooth, y ahora mismo tengo uno de esos chalecos. Conforme hablo… (Aplausos) el sonido se traduce en patrones dinámicos de vibración. Siento el mundo sonoro a mi alrededor.
12:01
Lo hemos estado probando con personas sordas, y resulta que solo un tiempo después, la gente puede empezar a sentir, a entender el lenguaje del chaleco.
12:14
Este es Jonathan. Tiene 37 años. Tiene un título de maestría. Nació con sordera profunda, por eso hay una parte de su umwelt que está fuera de su alcance. Tuvimos que entrenar a Jonathan con el chaleco durante 4 días, 2 horas al día, y aquí está en el quinto día.
Scott Novich: tú.
David Eagleman: Scott dice una palabra, Jonathan la siente en el chaleco, y la escribe en la pizarra.
SN: Dónde. Dónde.
DE: Jonathan puede traducir este complicado patrón de vibraciones en una comprensión de lo que se dice.
SN: Toca. Toca.
DE: Pero no lo está… (Aplausos) Jonathan no lo hace conscientemente, porque los patrones son muy complicados, pero su cerebro está empezando a desbloquear el patrón que le permite averiguar qué significan los datos, y esperamos que en unos 3 meses de usar el chaleco, tenga una experiencia de percepción de escuchar como la que tiene de la lectura un ciego que pasa un dedo sobre texto en braille, el significado viene de inmediato sin intervención consciente en absoluto. Esta tecnología tiene el potencial de un cambio importante, porque la única solución alternativa a la sordera es un implante coclear, que requiere una cirugía invasiva. Construir esto es 40 veces más barato que un implante coclear, permite ofrecer esta tecnología al mundo, incluso a los países más pobres.
14:00
Nos animan mucho los resultados obtenidos con la “sustitución sensorial”, pero hemos estado pensando mucho en la “adición sensorial”. ¿Cómo podríamos usar una tecnología como esta para añadir un nuevo sentido, para ampliar el umvelt humano? Por ejemplo, ¿podríamos ingresar datos en tiempo real de Internet en el cerebro de alguien? Ese alguien ¿puede desarrollar una experiencia perceptiva directa?
14:27
Este es un experimento que hacemos en el laboratorio. Un sujeto siente en tiempo real datos de la Red durante 5 segundos. Luego, aparecen dos botones, y tiene que hacer una elección. No sabe qué está pasando. Hace una elección, y tiene respuesta después de un segundo. Es así: El sujeto no tiene idea del significado de los patrones, pero vemos si mejora en la elección de qué botón presionar. No sabe que los datos que le ingresamos son datos bursátiles en tiempo real, y está decidiendo comprar y vender. (Risas) La respuesta le dice si tomó una buena decisión o no. Estamos viendo si podemos expandir el umwelt humano una experiencia perceptiva directa de los movimientos económicos del planeta. Informaremos de eso más adelante para ver cómo resulta.(Risas)Otra cosa que estamos haciendo: Durante las charlas de la mañana, filtramos automáticamente en Twitter con el hashtag TED2015, e hicimos un análisis automatizado de sentimientos es decir, ¿las personas usaron palabras positivas, negativas o neutras? Y mientras esto sucedía lo he estado sintiendo, estoy enchufado a la emoción consolidada de miles de personas en tiempo real, es un nuevo tipo de experiencia humana, porque ahora puedo saber cómo le va a los oradores y cuánto les gusta esto a Uds. (Risas) (Aplausos) Es una experiencia más grande de la que un ser humano normal puede tener.
16:11
También estamos ampliando el umwelt de los pilotos. En este caso, el chaleco transmite 9 métricas diferentes desde este cuadricóptero, cabeceo, guiñada, giro, orientación y rumbo, y eso mejora la destreza del piloto. Es como si extendiera su piel, a lo lejos.
16:33
Y eso es solo el principio. Estamos previendo tomar una cabina moderna llena de manómetros y en vez de tratar de leer todo eso, sentirlo. Ahora vivimos en un mundo de información, y hay una diferencia entre acceder a grandes volúmenes de datos y experimentarlos.
16:54
Así que creo que en realidad las posibilidades no tienen fin en el horizonte de la expansión humana. Imaginen un astronauta que pueda sentir la salud general de la Estación Espacial Internacional, o, para el caso, que Uds. sientan los estados invisibles de su propia salud, como el nivel de azúcar en sangre y el estado del microbioma, o tener visión de 360º o ver en el infrarrojo o ultravioleta.
17:23
La clave es esta: conforme avanzamos hacia el futuro, cada vez podremos elegir nuestros propios dispositivos periféricos. Ya no tenemos que esperar regalos sensoriales de la Madre Naturaleza en sus escalas de tiempo, pero en su lugar, como buena madre, nos ha dado las herramientas necesarias para hacer nuestro propio camino. Así que la pregunta ahora es: ¿cómo quieren salir a experimentar su univer Gracias. (Aplausos)
Chris Anderson: ¿Puedes sentirlo?
DE: Sí.En realidad, es la primera vez que siento aplausos en el chaleco. Es agradable. Es como un masaje. (Risas)
CA: Twitter se vuelve loco. El experimento del mercado de valores, ¿podría ser el primer experimento que asegure su financiación para siempre, de tener éxito?
DE: Bueno, es cierto, ya no tendría que escribirle al NIH.
CA: Bueno mira, para ser escéptico por un minuto, digo, es asombroso, pero ¿hay evidencia hasta el momento de que funcione la sustitución sensorial, o la adición sensorial? ¿No es posible que el ciego pueda ver por la lengua porque la corteza visual está todavía allí, lista para procesar, y que eso sea una parte necesaria?
18:55
DE: Gran pregunta. En realidad no tenemos ni idea de cuáles son los límites teóricos de los datos que puede asimilar el cerebro. La historia general, sin embargo, es que es extraordinariamente flexible. Cuando una persona queda ciega, lo que llamamos corteza visual es ocupada por el tacto, el oído, el vocabulario. Eso nos dice que la corteza es acotada. Solo hace ciertos tipos de cálculos sobre las cosas. Y si miramos a nuestro alrededor las cosas como el braille, por ejemplo, las personas reciben información mediante golpes en los dedos. No creo que haya razón para pensar que existe un límite teórico, que conozcamos ese límite.
19:33
CA: Si esto se comprueba, estarás abrumado. Hay muchas aplicaciones posibles para esto. ¿Estás listo para esto? ¿Qué es lo que más te entusiasma? ¿Qué se podría lograr?DE: Creo que hay gran cantidad de aplicaciones aquí. En términos de sustitución sensorial del mañana, algo empecé a mencionar de astronautas en la estación espacial, que pasan mucho tiempo controlando cosas y podrían en cambio ver que está pasando, porque esto es bueno para datos multidimensionales. La clave es: nuestros sistemas visuales son buenos detectando manchas y bordes, pero son muy malos para el mundo actual, con pantallas que tienen infinidad de datos. Tenemos que rastrear eso con nuestros sistemas de atención. Esta es una manera de solo sentir el estado de algo, como conocer el estado del cuerpo sobre la marcha. La maquinaria pesada, la seguridad, sentir el estado de una fábrica, de un equipo, hacia allí va en lo inmediato.
CA: David Eagleman, fue una charla alucinante. Muchas gracias.
DE: Gracias, Chris. (Aplausos)

 


David Eagleman (born April 25, 1971) is an American writer and neuroscientist, teaching at Stanford University.




 

 TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) és una societat de responsabilitat limitada estatunidenca que organitza un conjunt de conferències seguint el seu lema ideas worth spreading («idees que val la pena difondre»). La societat és propietat de la fundació sense ànim de lucre Sapling Foundation.

THE SCIENTIFIC CREED

dijous, 15/11/2018

Rupert Sheldrake, PhD

Here are the 10 core beliefs that most scientists take for granted.

“Tot és essencialment mecànic. Els gossos, per exemple, són mecanismes complexos, més que organismes vius amb objectius propis. Fins i tot les persones són màquines, «robots rudimentaris», en la vívida frase de Richard Dawkins, amb cervells que són com computadores genèticament programades .”
  1. Everything is essentially mechanical. Dogs, for example, are complex mechanisms, rather than living organisms with goals of their own. Even people are machines, «lumbering robots, «in Richard Dawkins’ vivid phrase, with brains that are like genetically programmed computers.
  2. All matter is unconscious. It has no inner life or subjectivity or point of view. Even human consciousness is an illusion produced by the material activities of brains.
  3. The total amount of matter and energy is always the same (with the exception of the Big Bang, when all the matter and energy of the universe suddenly appeared).
  4. The laws of nature are fixed. They are the same today as they were at the beginning, and they will stay the same forever.
  5. Nature is purposeless, and evolution has no goal or direction.
  6. All biological inheritance is material, carried in the genetic material, DNA, and in other material structures.
  7. Minds are inside heads and are nothing but the activities of brains. When you look at a tree, the image of the tree you are seeing is not “out there, «where it seems to be, but inside your brain.
  8. Memories are stored as material traces in brains and are wiped out at death.
  9. Unexplained phenomena like telepathy are illusory.
  10. Mechanistic medicine is the only kind that really works.

 

Together, these beliefs make up the philosophy or ideology of materialism, whose central assumption is that everything is essentially material or physical, even minds. This belief system became dominant within science in the late 19th century, and is now taken for granted. Many scientists are unaware that materialism is an assumption; they simply think of it as science, or the scientific view of reality, or the scientific worldview. They are not actually taught about it, or given a chance to discuss it. They absorb it by a kind of intellectual osmosis.

In everyday usage, materialism refers to a way of life devoted entirely to material interests, a preoccupation with wealth, possessions, and luxury. These attitudes are no doubt encouraged by the materialist philosophy, which denies the existence of any spiritual realities or non-material goals, but in this article I am concerned with materialism’s scientific claims, rather than its effects on lifestyles.

In the spirit of radical skepticism, each of these 10 doctrines can be turned into a question, as I show in my book Science Set Free (called The Science Delusion in the UK). Entirely new vistas open up when a widely accepted assumption is taken as the beginning of an inquiry, rather than as an unquestionable truth. For example, the assumption that nature is machine-like or mechanical becomes a question: “Is nature mechanical?”The assumption that matter is unconscious becomes “Is matter unconscious?”and so on.


The Science Delusion: Freeing the Spirit of Enquiry
Publisher: Coronet; Digital original edition (January 1, 2012)


 ISBN:9781444764642
ISBN 13: 9781444727944



The aim of this blog is to present to the public a ‘non-personal’ -and nonetheless suggestive- information that has already been released.

Is matter the only reality?

dimecres, 14/11/2018

Rupert Sheldrake, PhD

IS MATTER UNCONSCIOUS?

 

 
La doctrina central del materialisme és que la matèria és l’única realitat. Per tant, la consciència no hauria d’existir. El problema més important del materialisme és l’existència de la consciència . Ets conscient ara tu. La principal teoria que si oposa, el dualisme, accepta la realitat de la consciència, però no té cap explicació convincent per la seva interacció amb el cos i el cervell. Els arguments dualistes-materialistes han perdurat durant segles. Però si qüestionem el dogma de què la matèria és inconscient, podrem superar aquesta estèril contradicció.

The central doctrine of materialism is that matter is the only reality. Therefore, consciousness ought not to exist. Materialism’s biggest problem is that consciousness does exist. You are conscious now. The main opposing theory, dualism, accepts the reality of consciousness, but has no convincing explanation for its interaction with the body and the brain. Dualist–materialist arguments have gone on for centuries. But if we question the dogma that matter is unconscious, we can move forward from this sterile opposition.

Scientific materialism arose historically as a rejection of mechanistic dualism, which defined matter as unconscious and souls as immaterial, as I discuss below. One important motive for this rejection was the elimination of souls and God, leaving unconscious matter as the only reality. In short, materialists treated subjective experience as irrelevant; dualists accepted the reality of experience but were unable to explain how minds affect brains.

The materialist philosopher Daniel Dennett wrote a book called Consciousness Explained (1991), in which he tried to explain away consciousness by arguing that subjective experience is illusory. He was forced to this conclusion because he rejected dualism as a matter of principle:

I adopt the apparently dogmatic rule that dualism is to be avoided at all costs. It is not that I think I can give a knock-down proof that dualism, in all its forms, is false or incoherent, but that, given the way that dualism wallows in mystery, accepting dualism is giving up [his italics].10

This dogmatism of Dennett’s rule is not merely apparent: the rule is dogmatic. By “giving up” and “wallowing in mystery,” I suppose he means giving up science and reason and relapsing into religion and superstition. Materialism “at all costs” demands the denial of the reality of our own minds and personal experiences—including those of Daniel Dennett himself, although by putting forward arguments he hopes will be persuasive, he seems to make an exception for himself and for those who read his book.

Francis Crick devoted decades of his life to trying to explain consciousness mechanistically. He frankly admitted that the materialist theory was an “astonishing hypothesis” that flew in the face of common sense: “‘You’, your joys, and your sorrows, your memories and your ambitions, and your sense of personal identity and free will are in fact no more than the behavior of a vast assembly of nerve cells and their associated molecules.”11 Presumably Crick included himself in this description, although he must have felt that here was more to his argument than the automatic activity of nerve cells.

One of the motives of materialists is to support an anti-religious worldview. Francis Crick was a militant atheist, as is Daniel Dennett. On the other hand, one of the traditional motives of dualists is to support the possibility of the soul’s survival. If the human soul is immaterial, it may exist after bodily death.

Scientific orthodoxy has not always been materialist. The founders of mechanistic science in the 17th century were dualistic Christians. They downgraded matter, making it totally inanimate and mechanical, and at the same time upgraded human minds making them completely different from unconscious matter. By creating an unbridgeable gulf between the two, they thought they were strengthening the argument for the human soul and its immortality, as well as increasing the separation between humans and other animals.

This mechanistic dualism is often called Cartesian dualism after Descartes (Des Cartes). It saw the human mind as essentially immaterial and disembodied, and bodies as machines made of unconscious matter.12 In practice, most people take a dualist view for granted, as long as they are not called upon to defend it. Almost everyone assumes that we have some degree of free will, and are responsible for our actions. Our educational and legal systems are based on this belief. And we experience ourselves as conscious beings, with some degree of free choice. Even to discuss consciousness presupposes that we are conscious ourselves. Nevertheless, since the 1920s, most leading scientists and philosophers in the English-speaking world have been materialists, in spite of all the problems this doctrine creates.

The strongest argument in favor of materialism is the failure of dualism to explain how immaterial minds work and how they interact with brains. The strongest argument in favor of dualism is the implausibility and self-contradictory nature of materialism.

The dualist–materialist dialectic has lasted for centuries. The soul–body or mind–brain problem has refused to go away. But before we can move forward, first we need to understand in more detail what materialists claim, since their belief system dominates institutional science and medicine, and everyone is influenced by it.

—————————————-

SETTING SCIENCE FREE FROM MATERIALISM
Explore (NY). 2013 Jul-Aug;9(4)




The aim of this blog is to present to the public a ‘non-personal’ -and nonetheless suggestive- information that has already been released.

MINDS BEYOND BRAINS

dimarts , 13/11/2018

Rupert Sheldrake, PhD

 Resultado de imagen de Rupert Sheldrake
If our minds are not just the activity of our brains, there is no need for them to be confined to the insides of our heads. As I argue in my book Science Set Free, our minds are extended in every act of perception, reaching even as far as the stars. Vision involves a two-way process: the inward movement of light into the eyes and the outward projection of images. What we see around us is in our minds but not in our brains. When we look at something, in a sense, our mind touches it. This may help to explain the sense of being stared at. Most people say they have felt when someone was looking at them from behind, and most people also claim to have made people turn round by looking at them. This ability to detect stares seems to be real, as shown in many scientific tests, and even seems to work through closed circuit television. Minds are extended beyond brains not only in space but also in time, and connect us to our own pasts through memory and to virtual futures, among which we choose.
As discussed in Science Set Free, repeated failures to find memory traces fit well with the idea of memory as a resonant phenomenon, where similar past patterns of activity in the past affect present activities in minds and brains. Individual and collective memory both depend on resonance, but self-resonance from an individual’s own past is more specific and hence more effective. Animal and human learning may be transmitted by morphic resonance across space and time. The resonance theory helps account for the ability of memories to survive serious damage to brains, and is consistent with all-known kinds of remembering.
This theory predicts that if animals, say rats, learn a new trick in one place, say Harvard, rats all over the world should be able to learn it faster thereafter. There is already evidence that this actually happens. Similar principles apply to human learning. For example, if millions of people do standard tests, like IQ tests, they should become progressively easier, on average, for other people to do. Again, this seems to be what happens. Individual memory and collective memory are different aspects of the same phenomenon and differ in degree, not in kind.And if minds are not confined to brains in space or in time, it becomes much easier to understand how psychic phenomena like telepathy might fit into an expanded, post-materialist science.
Here I have space only to summarize my conclusions from an extended discussion in Science Set Free.Most people claim to have had telepathic experiences. Numerous statistical experiments have shown that information can be transmitted from person to person in a way that cannot be explained in terms of the normal senses. Telepathy typically happens between people who are closely bonded, like mothers and children, spouses and close friends. Many nursing mothers seem to be able to detect when their babies are in distress when they are miles away. The commonest kind of telepathy in the modern world occurs in connection with telephone calls when people think of someone who then rings, or who just know who is calling. Numerous experimental tests have shown that this is a real phenomenon. It does not fall off with distance. Social animals seem to be able to keep in touch with members of their group at a distance telepathically, and domesticated animals like dogs, cats, horses, and parrots often pick up their owners’ emotions and intentions at a distance as shown in experiments with dogs and parrots.Other psychic abilities include premonitions and precognitions, as shown by their anticipation of earthquakes, tsunamis, and other disasters by many species of animals. Human premonitions usually occur in dreams or through intuitions. In experimental research on human presentiments, future emotional events seem able to work “backwards” in time to produce detectable physiological effects.
Si les nostres ments no són només l’activitat del nostre cervell, no cal que estiguin confinades a l’interior dels nostres caps. Com argumento en el meu llibre Science Set Free, les nostres ments s’estenen en tots els actes de la percepció, arribant fins i tot a les estrelles.La visió implica un procés bidireccional: el moviment de la llum cap endins dels ulls, i la projecció exterior de les imatges. El que veiem al nostre voltant està en la nostra ment però no en el nostre cervell. Quan observem alguna cosa, en un sentit, la nostra ment la toca. Això pot ajudar a explicar el sentit de mirar-lo. La majoria de les persones diuen que han sentit quan algú els mira des del darrere, i la majoria de la gent també afirma haver fet que la gent es giri a mirar-los. Aquesta capacitat de detecció d’observacions sembla ser real, tal com es demostra en moltes proves científiques, i fins i tot sembla que funciona a través de circuits tancats de televisió. Les ments s’estenen més enllà dels cervells no només en l’espai sinó també en el temps, i ens connecten amb el nostre propi passat mitjançant la memòria i als futurs virtuals, entre els quals triem.
Tal com s’ha comentat a Science Set Free, els repetits fracassos per trobar els rastres de memòria s’adapten bé a la idea de la memòria com un fenomen ressonant, on patrons passats d’activitat similars en el passat afecten les activitats presents en ment i cervell. La memòria individual i col·lectiva depèn de la ressonància, però l’auto-ressonància del passat propi d’un individu és més específica i, per tant, més eficaç. L’aprenentatge animal i humà pot ser transmès per ressonància morfològica a través de l’espai i el temps. La teoria de la ressonància ajuda a comprendre la capacitat dels records per sobreviure greus danys en el cervell i és coherent amb els tipus de records reconeguts.Aquesta teoria prediu que si els animals, per exemple les rates, aprenen un nou truc en un lloc, diguem Harvard, les rates de tot el món haurien de poder aprendre-ho més ràpidament després. Ja hi ha proves que això succeeix realment. S’apliquen principis similars a l’aprenentatge humà Per exemple, si milions de persones fan proves estàndard, com a proves de CI, han de ser progressivament més fàcils, de mitjana, per a altres persones. Un cop més, això sembla ser el que passa. La memòria individual i la memòria col·lectiva són aspectes diferents del mateix fenomen i es diferencien en grau, no en espècie. I si les ments no es limiten als cervells a l’espai o al temps, es fa més fàcil comprendre com els fenòmens psíquics com la telepatia podrien encaixar en una ciència expandida i post-material.

Aquí només tinc espai per resumir les meves conclusions d’una discussió prolongada a Science Set Free. La majoria de les persones afirma haver tingut experiències telepàtiques. Nombrosos experiments estadístics han demostrat que la informació es pot transmetre de persona a persona d’una manera que no es pot explicar en els termes dels sentits normals. La telepatia sol passar entre persones que estan estretament vinculades, com mares i fills, cònjuges i amics propers. Moltes mares lactants semblen ser capaços de detectar quan els seus bebès estan en perill quan estan a unes milles de distància. El tipus de telepatia més comú en el món modern es produeix en relació amb les trucades telefòniques quan la gent pensa en algú i després truca o que simplement sap qui està trucant. Nombroses proves experimentals han demostrat que es tracta d’un veritable fenomen. No decau amb la distància. Els animals socials semblen poder mantenir-se en contacte amb els membres del seu grup de manera telepàtica a distància, i els animals domesticats, com ara gossos, gats, cavalls i lloros, sovint recullen les emocions i intencions dels seus propietaris a distància, com es mostra en experiments amb gossos. i lloros.Altres habilitats psíquiques inclouen premonicions i precognicions, tal com demostren l’anticipació de terratrèmols, tsunamis i altres desastres per part de moltes espècies d’animals. Les premonicions humanes solen produir-se en somnis o per intuïcions. En la investigació experimental sobre pressentiments humans, futurs esdeveniments emocionals semblen capaços de treballar “a l’inrevés”, cap enrere en el temps, produint efectes fisiològics detectables.

 

————————————————————–

Setting Science Free From Materialism
EXPLORE July/August 2013, Vol. 9, No. 4

Freeing the Spirit of Inquiry -by Rupert Sheldrake-

dilluns, 12/11/2018

Science is wonderful and necessary – one of the great creations of humankind. Most importantly, it is helping us to see just how extraordinary life and the universe really are, far exceeding the unaided imagination even of the greatest poets. At its best, too, science lives up to its own mythology: a disinterested, self-effacing search after truth, carried out by people of humility in true generosity of spirit. As a fairly considerable bonus it has led us to create a wide range of “high” (science-based) technologies that have improved the lives of a great many people, and have the potential to help all humankind and our fellow creatures too.

But alas, in large measure, science and the idea of it have been seriously corrupted. That some of its high technologies are not in the general good is all too obvious – although it isn’t always obvious which ones are and which ones aren’t. Even more to the point, and in some ways more serious, is that science all too often becomes the enemy of what it should stand for. Although it must have rules and methods – in particular, the ideas of science must be testable – it should be open-minded. It should go where the data lead. That’s what the myth says it does do – but the reality is very different.

The Science Delusion – Rupert Sheldrake

diumenge, 11/11/2018

Alfred Rupert Sheldrake has developed the concept of “morphic resonance”.

Transcripts

The science delusion is the belief that science already understands the nature of reality in principle leaving only the details to be filled in. This is a very wide spread belief in our society. It’s the kind of belief system of people who say I don’t believe in God, I believe in science. It is a belief system which has now been spread to the entire world.
But there’s a conflict in the heart of science between science as a method of inquiry based on reason, evidence, hypothesis, and collective investigation and science as a belief system or a world view.
And unfortunately the world view aspect of science has come to inhibit and constrict the free inquiry which is the very lifeblood of the scientific endeavor.Since the late 19th century, science has been conducted under the aspect of a belief system or world view which is essentially that of materialism. Philosophical materialism.And the sciences are now wholly-owned subsidiaries of the materialist world view. I think that, as we break out of it, the sciences will be regenerated.
1:36 – 1:42What I do in my book ‘The Science Delusion’ – which is called ‘Science Set Free’ in the United States – is: take the ten dogmas or assumptions of science and turn them into questions, seeing how well they stand up if you look at them scientifically.1:57 – 1:59None of them stand up very well.What I am going to do is first run through what these ten dogmas are, and then I will only have time to discuss one or two of them in a bit more detail.2:09 – 2:13

But essentially the ten dogmas which are the default world view of most educated people all over the world are, first that nature is mechanical or machine like, the universe is like a machine, animals and plants are like machines, we are like machines.In fact, we are machines.We are “lumbering robots” in Richard Dawkins’ vivid phrase, with brains that are genetically programed computers.

2:36 – 2:41

Second, matter is unconscious, the whole universe is made up of unconscious matter.There is no consciousness in stars, in galaxies, in planets, in animals, in plants, and there ought not to be any in us either, if this theory is true.2:52 – 2:56So a lot of the philosophy of mind over the last hundred years has been trying to prove that we are not really conscious at all.

3:00 – 3:08

So the matter is unconscious, then the laws of nature are fixed. This is the dogma three.

3:08 – 3:12

The laws of nature are the same now as they were at the time of the Big Bang and they will be the same forever. Not just the laws but the constants of nature are fixed which is why they are called constants.

3:20 – 3:25

Dogma four: the total amount of matter and energy is always the same. It never changes in total quantity except at the moment of the Big Bang when it all sprang into existence from nowhere in a single instant.

3:35 – 3:40

The fifth dogma is that nature is purposeless, there is no purposes in all nature and the evolutionary process has no purpose or direction.

3:47 – 3:54

Dogma six: the biological heredity is material, everything you inherit is in your genes or in epigenetic modifications of the genes, or in cytoplasmic inheritance. It is material.

4:03 – 4:08

Dogma seven: memories are stored inside your brain as material traces. Somehow everything you remember is in your brain in modified nerve endings phosphorylated proteins. No one knows how it works, but nevertheless almost everyone in the scientific world believes it must be in the brain.

Dogma eight: your mind is inside your head. All your consciousness is the activity of your brain and nothing more.

4:30 – 4:37

Dogma nine, which follows from dogma eight: psychic phenomena like telepathy are impossible.

4:37 – 4:40

Your thoughts and intentions can not have any effect at a distance because your mind is inside your head. Therefore all the apparent evidence for telepathy and other psychic phenomena is illusory.

4:49 – 4:53

People believe these things happen but it is just because they don’t know enough about statistics, or they are deceived by coincidences or it is wishful thinking.

5:00 – 5:04

And dogma ten: mechanistic medicine is the only kind that really works. That is why governments only fund research into mechanistic medicine and ignore complementary and alternative therapies. Those can’t possibly really work because they are not mechanistic, they may appear to work because people would have got better anyway or because of the placebo effect. But the only kind that really works is mechanistic medicine.

5:28 – 5:34

Well, this is the default world view which is held by almost all educated people all over the world, it is the basis of the educational system, the national health service, the Medical Research Council, governments, and it is just the default world view of educated people.

5:49 – 5:53

But I think every one of these dogmas is very, very questionable and when you look at it, it turns they fall apart.

5:59 – 6:03

I am going to take first the idea that the laws of nature are fixed. This is a hangover from an older world view before the 1960’s when the Big Bang theory came in.

6:09 – 6:15

People thought that the whole universe was eternal, governed by eternal mathematical laws. When the Big Bang came in, then that assumption continued, even though the Big Bang revealed a universe that is radically evolutionary about 14 billion years old. Growing, and developing, and evolving for 14 billion years. Growing and cooling and more structures and patterns appear within it.

6:36 – 6:41

But the idea is, all the laws of nature were completely fixed at the moment of the Big Bang, like a cosmic Napoleonic Code.

6:44 – 6:46

As my friend Terence McKenna used to say: “Modern science is based on the principle: give us one free miracle and we’ll explain the rest.”

6:52 – 6:56

And the one free miracle is the appearance of all the matter and energy in the universe and all the laws that govern it from nothing in a single instant.

7:02 – 7:07

Well, in an evolutionary universe, why shouldn’t the laws themselves evolve? After all human laws do, and the idea of the laws of the nature is based on a metaphor with human law.

7:14 – 7:20

It is a very anthropocentric metaphor: only humans have laws, in fact only civilized societies have laws.

7:20 – 7:23

As C. S. Lewis once said, “To say that a stone falls to earth because it is obeying a law makes it a man and even a citizen.” It is a metaphor that we got so used to, we forget it is a metaphor.

7:34 – 7:38

In an evolving universe I think a much better idea is the idea of habits. I think the habits of nature evolve, the regularities of nature are essentially habitual.

7:45 – 7:49

This was an idea put forward at the beginning of the 20th century by the American philosopher C. S. Peirce.

7:52 – 7:55

And it is an idea which various other philosophers have entertained, it is one which I myself have developed into a scientific hypothesis, the hypothesis of morphic resonance which is the basis of these evolving habits.

8:07 – 8:11

According to this hypothesis, everything in nature has a kind of collective memory. Resonance occurs on the basis of similarity. As a young giraffe embryo grows in its mother’s womb, it tunes in to the morphic resonance of previous giraffes, it draws on that collective memory, it grows like a giraffe, it behaves like a giraffe because it is drawing on this collective memory.

8:32 – 8:37

It has to have the right genes to make the right proteins, but genes in my view are grossly overrated.

8:37 – 8:44

They only account for the proteins that the organism can make, not the shape, or form, or the behavior.

8:45 – 8:49

Every species has a kind of collective memory. Even crystals do. This theory predicts that if you make a new kind of crystal for the first time, the very first time you make it, it won’t have an existing habit.

9:00 – 9:05

But once it crystallizes, then the next time you make it there will be an influence from the first crystals to the second ones all over the world, by morphic resonance it will crystallize a bit easier.

9:11 – 9:14

The third time there will be an influence from the first and second crystals.

9:15 – 9:21

There is in fact good evidence that new compounds get easier to crystallize all around the world, just as this theory would predict.

9:23 – 9:28

It also predicts that if you train animals to learn a new trick, for example rats learn a new trick in London, then all round the world rats of the same breed should learn the same trick quicker just because rats have learned it here. And surprisingly, there is already evidence that this actually happens.

9:43 – 9:47

Anyway, that is my hypotheses in a nutshell of morphic resonance, everything depends on evolving habits not on fixed laws.

9:51 – 9:55

But I want to spend a few moments on the constants of nature too.
Because these, are again, assumed to be constant. Things like the gravitational constant, the speed of light are called the fundamental constants.

10:05 – 10:07

Are they really constant?

Well, when I got interested in this question I tried to find out.

They are given in physics handbooks.
Handbooks of physics list the existing fundamental constants and tell you their value. But I wanted to see if they’ve changed, so I got the old volumes of physical handbooks.

10:24 – 10:28

I went to the Patent Office Library here in London, and they are the only place I could find that kept the old volumes, normally people throw them away. When the new values come out, they throw away the old ones.

10:37 – 10:42

When I did this I found out that the speed of light dropped between 1928 and 1945 by about 20 kilometers per second.

10:45 – 10:52

It’s a huge drop because they were given with the errors of any fractions, decimal points of error. And yet, all over the world it dropped and they were all getting values very similar to each other with tiny errors, then in (1945) 1948 it went up again, and then people started getting very similar values again.

11:08 – 11:11

I was very intrigued by this, and I couldn’t make sense of it, so I went to see the Head of Metrology, at the National Physical Laboratory, in Teddington. Metrology is the science in which people measure constants.

11:22 – 11:23

And I asked him about this, I said: what do you make of this drop in the speed of light between 1928 and 1945?

11:29 – 11:31

And he said, “Oh dear”, he said “you uncovered the most embarrassing episode in the history of our sciences.”

11:36 – 11:42

I said well, could the speed of light have actually dropped, and that would have amazing implications if so.

And he said, “no, no, of course it couldn’t have actually dropped, it is a constant!”

11:48 – 11:51

Oh, well then how do you explain the fact that everyone was almost finding it going much slower during that period?

11:54 – 11:59

Is it because they were fudging their results to get what they thought other people should be getting and the whole thing was just produced in the minds of physicists?

12:04 – 12:07

“We don’t like to use the word fudge.” I said, well what do you prefer? He said, “well we prefer to call it intellectual phase-locking.”

12:20 – 12:23

So if this was going on then, how can we be so sure it is not going on today, and that the present values produced by intellectual phase-locking?

12:28 – 12:30

And he said, “no, we know it is not the case.”

I said, how do we know?

12:32 – 12:35

He said, “well, we have solved the problem”. I said well how?

12:35 – 12:40

He said, “well we fixed the speed of light by definition in 1972″.

So it might still change.

12:44 – 12:48

He said, “Yes but we’ll never know because we defined the metre in terms of the speed of light, so the units have changed with it”.

12:50 – 12:53

So he looked very pleased about that, they’d fixed their problem. But I said, well then what about Big G?

12:59 – 13:04

The gravitational constant known in the trade as Big G, it is written with the capital G.

13:04 – 13:11

Newton’s universal gravitational constant. That has varied by more than 1.3 per cent in recent years.

And it seems to vary from place to place and from time to time.

And he said, “well there is a chance of errors, and unfortunately there are quite big errors with the Big G.

13:24 – 13:28

So I said, what if it is really changing, perhaps it is really changing.

13:29 – 13:33

And then I looked at how they do it: what happens is that they measure it in different labs, they get different values on different days, and then they average them.

13:38 – 13:40

And then other labs from around the world do the same and they come out usually with a rather different average.

13:42 – 13:47

And then the International Committee on Metrology meets every 10 years or so and averages the ones from labs from around the world to come out with the value of Big G.

13:52 – 13:57

But what if G were actually fluctuating? What if it changed? There is already evidence actually that it changes throughout the day and throughout the year.

14:02 – 14:07

What if the Earth, as it moves through the galactic environment, went through patches of dark matter or other environmental factors that could alter it? Maybe they all change together.

14:13 – 14:16

What if these errors are going up together and down together?

For more than 10 years I have been trying to persuade metrologists to look at the raw data.

14:21 – 14:24

In fact, I am now trying to persuade them to put it online on the internet, with the dates and the actual measurements, and see if they are correlated; to see if they are all up at one time, all down at another.

14:32 – 14:37

If so they might be fluctuating together and that would tell us something very, very interesting. But no one has done this, they haven’t done it because G is a constant.

14:41 – 14:43

There is no point in looking for changes. You see, here is a very simple example of where a dogmatic assumption actually inhibits inquiry.

14:49 – 14:54

I myself think that the constants may vary quite considerably. Well within narrow limits, but they may all be varying.

14:57 – 15:02

And I think the day will come when scientific journals like Nature have weekly reports on the constants like stock market reports in the newspapers.

15:05 – 15:12

This week Big G was slightly up, the charge on the electron was down, the speed of light held steady, and so on.

15:16 – 15:25

So, that is one area, just one area where I think thinking less dogmatically could open things up.

15:25 – 15:28

One of the biggest areas is the nature of the mind, this is the most unsolved problem as Graham has just said.

15:32 – 15:35

Science simply can’t deal with the fact that we are conscious. And it can’t deal with the fact that our thoughts don’t seem to be inside our brains.

15:43 – 15:46

Our experiences don’t all seem to be inside our brain. Your image of me now doesn’t seem to be inside your brain.

15:50 – 15:54

Yet the official view is that there is a little Rupert somewhere inside your head and everything else in this room is inside your head. Your experiences is inside your brain.

16:00 – 16:04

I am suggesting actually that vision involves an outward projection of images, what you are seeing is in your mind but not inside your head.

16:08 – 16:12

Our minds are extended beyond our brains in the simple act of perception.

I think that we project out the images we are seeing and these images touch what we are looking at.

16:19 – 16:24

If I look at you from behind and you don’t know I am there, could I affect you? Could you feel my gaze? There is a great deal of evidence that people can.

16:29 – 16:32

The sense of being stared at is an extremely common experience, and recent experimental research actually suggests it is real.

Animals seem to have it too. I think it probably evolved in the context of predator-prey relationships.

16:42 – 16:47

Prey animals that can feel the gaze of the predator would survive better than those that couldn’t.

16:47 – 16:53

This would lead to a whole new way of thinking about ecological relationships between predators and prey, also about the extent of our minds.

16:55 – 17:01

If we look at distant stars, I think our minds reach out in the sense to touch these stars and literally extend out over astronomical different distances.

17:05 – 17:08

They are not just inside our heads. Now it may seem astonishing that this is a topic of debate in the 21st century.

17:13 – 17:17

We know so little about our own minds that where our images are is a hot topic of debate within consciousness studies right now.

17:22 – 17:28

I don’t have time to deal with anymore of these dogmas, but every single one of them is questionable. If one questions it, new forms of research, new possibilities open up.

17:33 – 17:38

And I think as we question these dogmas that have held back science so long, science will undergo a re-flowering, a Renaissance.

17:43 – 17:45

I am a total believer in the importance of science. I have spent my whole life as a research scientist, my whole career.
But I think by moving beyond these dogmas it can be regenerated. Once again it will become interesting, and I hope life affirming.
Thank you.

La ilusión de la ciencia es la creencia de que la ciencia ya entiende la naturaleza de la realidad, en principio, dejando cualquiera de estos detalles por llenar. Esta es una creencia muy extendida en nuestra sociedad. Es la clase de sistema de creencia de las personas que dicen “No creo en Dios, creo en la ciencia”. Es la clase de sistema de creencia que ha sido extendida al mundo entero.
Pero hay un conflicto en el corazón de la ciencia, entre la ciencia como método de indagación basada en la razón, la evidencia, la hipótesis y la investigación colectiva y la ciencia como una sistema de creencias o como una visión del mundo
Y por desgracia, la visión del mundo acerca de la ciencia ha llegado a inhibir y constreñir la libre investigación, que es el alma misma del quehacer científico.Desde finales del siglo 19, la ciencia ha llevado a cabo bajo el aspecto del sistema de creencias o visión del mundo el cual es esencialmente el del materialismo. El materialismo filosófico.Y las ciencias son ahora subsidiarias al cien por cien de la visión del mundo materialista. Creo que, a medida que salgamos de ella, las ciencias se regenerarán.1:36 – 1:42Lo que hago en mi libro “El Espejismo de la Ciencia” – titulado ‘Science Set Free’ en los Estados Unidos – es: tomar los diez dogmas o supuestos de la ciencia y convertirlos en preguntas, viendo que tan firme son si nos fijamos en ellos científicamente.1:57 – 1:59

Ninguno lo es.Lo que voy a hacer es repasar por lo que estos diez dogmas son, y luego solo tendré tiempo para discutir uno o dos de ellos con un poco más de detalle..

2:09 – 2:13

Pero esencialmente los diez dogmas que son la visión del mundo por defecto de las personas con mejor educación son, primero, que la naturaleza es mecánica, o parecida a una maquinaria, el universo es como una máquina, animales y plantas son como máquinas, nosotros somos como máquinas.De hecho, lo somos.Somos “torpes robots” según la vívida frase de Richard Dawkins, con cerebros que están genéticamente programados como ordenadores.

2:36 – 2:41

En segundo lugar, la materia está inconsciente, todo el universo está hecho de materia inconsciente.No hay conciencia en las estrellas, en las galaxias, en los planetas, en los animales, en las plantas, y no debería haberlo en ninguno de nosotros, si esta teoría es cierta.2:52 – 2:56Por tanto, gran parte de la filosofía de la mente en los últimos cien años ha estado tratando de demostrar que no somos realmente concientes, en absoluto.

3:00 – 3:08

Asi que siendo la materia inconsciente las leyes de la naturaleza son fijas. Este es el tercer dogma.

3:08 – 3:12

Las leyes de la naturaleza son las mismas ahora como lo fueron en el momento del Big Bang. y serán las mismas para siempre. No solo las leyes, sino también las constantes son fijas, y por eso se llaman constantes.

3:20 – 3:25

Cuarto dogma: la cantidad de materia y energía siempre es la misma. Nunca cambia en cantidad total, excepto en el momento del Big Bang, cuando todo surgió a la existencia desde la nada en un solo instante.

3:35 – 3:40

El quinto dogma es que la naturaleza no tiene propósito, no hay finalidad alguna en toda la naturaleza y el proceso evolutivo no tiene propósito o dirección.

3:47 – 3:54

Dogma seis: la heredad biológica es material, todo lo que hereda en los genes o en las modificaciones epigenéticas de los genes o en la herencia citoplasmática. Es material.

4:03 – 4:08

Séptimo dogma: las memorias se almacenan dentro de su cerebro como huellas materiales. De alguna manera todo lo que recuerda está en el cerebro en las terminaciones nerviosas con proteínas fosforiladas modificadas. Nadie sabe como funciona, sin embargo casi todos en el mundo científico cree que debe estar en el cerebro.

Octavo dogma: tu mente está dentro de tu cabeza. Todo su conciencia es la actividad de su cerebro y nada más.

4:30 – 4:37

Noveno dogma, que sigue al octavo dogma: los fenómenos físicos como la telepatía son imposibles.

4:37 – 4:40

Tus pensamientos e intenciones no pueden tener ningún efecto a distancia porque su mente está en su cabeza. Por lo tanto toda la evidencia aparente de telepatía y otros fenómenos son ilusorias.

4:49 – 4:53

Las personas creen que estas cosas pasan, pero son solo porque no saben lo suficiente de estadísticas, o están siendo engañadas por coincidencias o su pensamiento deseoso.

5:00 – 5:04

Y décimo dogma: la medicina mecanicista es la única que realmente funciona. Es por ello que los gobiernos sólo financian la investigación en medicina mecanicista e ignoran las terapias complementarias y alternativas. No es posible que estas funcionen porque no son mecanicistas, puede parecer que funcionen porque la gente mejoran de todos modos o por el efecto placebo. Pero la único que realmente funciona es la medicina mecanicista.

5:28 – 5:34

Bueno, esta es la visión del mundo por defecto que sostienen casi todas las personas educadas en todo el mundo, que es la base del sistema educativo, el servicio nacional de salud, el Consejo de Investigación Médica, gobiernos, y es sólo la visión del mundo por defecto de la gente educada.

5:49 – 5:53

Pero creo que cada uno de estos dogmas es muy, muy cuestionable y cuando usted lo mira, resulta que se desmoronan.

5:59 – 6:03

Primero voy a tomar la idea de que las leyes de la naturaleza son fijas. Esta es una resaca de una visión más antigua del mundo antes de la década de 1960, cuando entró en vigor la teoría del Big Bang.

6:09 – 6:15

La gente pensaba que todo el universo era eterno, regido por leyes matemáticas eternas. Cuando la idea el Big Bang entro en rigor, esa asunción continuó, a pesar de que el Big Bang revela un universo radicalmente evolutivo unos 14 mil millones de años. Creciendo, y desarrollándose, y evolucionando por 14 mil millones de años. Creciendo y enfriándose y apareciendo en él mas estructuras y patrones.

6:36 – 6:41

Pero la idea es, todas las leyes de la naturaleza estaban completamente arregladas al momento del Big Bang, como un Código Napoleónico cósmico.

6:44 – 6:46

Como solía decir mi amigo Terence McKenna: “La ciencia moderna se basa en el principio: danos un milagro sin más y ya explicaremos el resto.”

6:52 – 6:56

Y el único milagro sin compromiso es la aparición de toda la materia y energía en el universo y todas las leyes que la gobiernan desde la nada en un solo instante.

7:02 – 7:07

Bueno, en un universo evolutivo, ¿por qué no evolucionan las leyes mismas? Despues de todo las leyes humanas lo hacen, y la idea de las leyes de la naturaleza se basa en una metáfora de la ley humana.

7:14 – 7:20

Es una metáfora muy antropocéntrica: sólo los seres humanos tienen leyes, de hecho, sólo las sociedades civilizadas tienen leyes.

7:20 – 7:23

Como dijo una vez C. S. Lewis, “Decir que una piedra cae a la tierra porque obedece a una ley hace que sea un hombre e incluso un ciudadano.” Es una metáfora a la que nos acostumbramos tanto, que nos olvidamos de que es una metáfora.

7:34 – 7:38

En un universo en evolución creo que una idea mucho mejor seria la idea de los hábitos. Creo que los hábitos de la naturaleza evolucionan, las regularidades de la naturaleza son esencialmente habituales.

7:45 – 7:49

Ésta fue una idea propuesta a principios del siglo 20 por el filósofo norteamericano C. S. Peirce.

7:52 – 7:55

Y es una idea que otros filósofos han agasajado, es una de las cuales, personalmente he desarrollado a una hipótesis científica, la hipótesis de la resonancia mórfica la cual es la base de éstos hábitos evolutivos.

8:07 – 8:11

De acuerdo con esta hipótesis, todo en la naturaleza tiene una especie de memoria colectiva. La resonancia se produce sobre la base de similitud. Como un joven embrión de jirafa crece en el vientre de su madre, lo sintoniza a la resonancia mórfica de las jirafas anteriores, se atrae a esa memoria colectiva, crece como una jirafa, se comporta como una jirafa porque se atrae a esta memoria colectiva.

8:32 – 8:37

Tiene que tener los genes correctos para hacer las proteínas adecuadas, pero los genes, en mi opinión están extremadamente sobrevalorados.

8:37 – 8:44

Sólo representan las proteínas que el organismo puede hacer, no la forma. la configuración física o el comportamiento.

8:45 – 8:49

Cada especie tiene una forma de memoria colectiva. Inclusive los cristales lo tienen. Esta teoría predice que si usted hace un nuevo tipo de cristal por primera vez, la primera vez que lo haga no va a tener una condición preexistente.

9:00 – 9:05

Pero una vez que se cristalice, la próxima vez que lo hagas habrá una influencia desde los primeros cristales hasta los segundos en todo el mundo, por resonancia mórfica se cristalizarán un poco más fácilmente.

9:11 – 9:14

La tercera vez, habrá una influencia de los cristales de primera y segunda.

9:15 – 9:21

De hecho, hay pruebas convincentes de que los nuevos compuestos son más fáciles de cristalizar en todo el mundo, justo como ésta teoría predeciría.

9:23 – 9:28

Tambien predice que si entrenas animales a hacer nuevos trucos por ejemplo, ratas que aprendan un nuevo truco en Londres, a continuación, las ratas de la misma raza de todo el mundo deben aprender el mismo truco más rápido simplemente porque las ratas lo han aprendido aquí. Y, sorprendentemente, ya hay evidencias de que esto realmente suceda.

9:43 – 9:47

De todas formas, en pocas palabras, esa es mi hipótesis de resonancia mórfica, todo depende de la evolución de los hábitos no en leyes fijas.

9:51 – 9:55

Pero quiero pasar unos momentos de las constantes de la naturaleza también.
Porque estás, son de nuevo, asumidas como constantes. Las cosas como la constante gravitacional, la velocidad de la luz son llamadas constantes fundamentales.

10:05 – 10:07

¿Son realmente una constante?

Bueno, cuando me centré en esta interrogante, traté de descubrirlo.

Se dan en manuales de física.
Los manuales de física enumeran las constantes fundamentales existentes y le informarán su valor. Pero yo quería ver si han cambiado, así que me dieron los viejos volúmenes de manuales de física.

10:24 – 10:28

Fui a la biblioteca de la Oficina de Patentes aquí en Londres, y son el único lugar que pude encontrar que mantuvo los viejos volúmenes, normalmente las personas las tiran. Cuando los nuevos valores salen, tiran los antiguos.

10:37 – 10:42

Cuando hice esto, me di cuenta de que la velocidad de la luz se redujo entre 1928 y 1945 por cerca de 20 kilómetros por segundo.

10:45 – 10:52

Es una enorme reducción porque eran dadas con errores de cualquier fraccion, puntos decimales de error. Y, sin embargo, se redujo en todo el mundo obteniendo valores muy similares en cada uno con pequeños errores, luego en (1945) 1948 volvió a subir, y las personas comenzaron a tener valores muy similares de nuevo.

11:08 – 11:11

Estaba muy intrigado por esto, y no le encontré ningún sentido, asi que fui a ver al Jefe de Metrología, en el Laboratorio Nacional de Física, en Teddington. La Metrología es la ciencia con la cual las personas miden las constantes.

11:22 – 11:23

Y le pregunté acerca de esto, le dije: ¿Qué opina de esta caída en la velocidad de la luz entre 1928 y 1945?

11:29 – 11:31

Y me dijo, “Oh cielos”, dijo “que descubrieron el episodio más vergonzoso en la historia de nuestras ciencias.”

11:36 – 11:42

Le dije, bueno, podría la velocidad de la luz haberse reducido en realidad, y de serlo, tendría implicaciones sorprendentes.

Y dijo, “¡no, no, claro que no pudo haberse reducido, es una constante!”

11:48 – 11:51

Oh, bueno, entonces ¿cómo se explica el hecho de que todo el mundo estuvo a punto de encontrar que va mucho más lento durante ese período?

11:54 – 11:59

¿Sería porque estaban manipulando sus resultados para conseguir lo que pensaban que los demás deben conseguir y toda esto se ​​acaba de producir en la mente de los físicos?

12:04 – 12:07

“No nos gusta usar la palabra manipular.” Le dije, ¿bueno, que prefiere? El dijo, “bueno, nosotros preferimos llamarlo fase de bloqueo intelectual.”

12:20 – 12:23

Así que si esto sucedía entonces, ¿cómo podemos estar tan seguro de que no está sucediendo hoy en día, y que hacemos con los actuales valores producidos en las fases de bloqueo intelectual?

12:28 – 12:30

Y él dijo, “no, sabemos que no es el caso.”

Le dije, ¿Como sabemos?

12:32 – 12:35

Me dijo, “bueno, hemos resuelto el problema”. Le dije ¿bueno, cómo?

12:35 – 12:40

Dijo, “bueno, hemos fijado/arreglado por definición la velocidad de la luz en 1972″.

Asi que podría todavía cambiarse.

12:44 – 12:48

Él dijo: “Sí, pero nunca lo sabremos porque definimos el metro en función de la velocidad de la luz, por lo que las unidades han cambiado con él.”

12:50 – 12:53

Así se veía muy contento por eso, que habían arreglado su problema. Pero yo le dije, bueno, entonces ¿qué pasa con la Gran G?

12:59 – 13:04

La constante gravitacional conocido en el intercambio como la Gran G, que está escrito con la G mayúscula.

13:04 – 13:11

La constante gravitacional universal de Newton. Que ha variada en más de un 1,3 por ciento en los últimos años.

Y parece que variará de un lugar a otro de tanto en tanto.

Y él dijo: “Bueno, hay una posibilidad de errores, y por desgracia son muy grandes los errores con la Gran G.

13:24 – 13:28

Así que le dije, y si realmente está cambiando, tal vez realmente está cambiando.

13:29 – 13:33

Y entonces miré cómo lo hacen: lo que pasa es que lo miden en diferentes laboratorios, obtienen valores diferentes en diferentes días, y luego tienen un promedio de ellas.

13:38 – 13:40

Y luego otros laboratorios de todo el mundo hacen lo mismo y salen por lo general con un promedio bastante diferente.

13:42 – 13:47

Y entonces el Comité Internacional de Metrología se reúne cada 10 años más o menos y obtienen los promedios los de los laboratorios de todo el mundo para dar con el valor de la Gran G.

13:52 – 13:57

Pero, ¿y si G estuviera realmente fluctuando? ¿Y si cambiara? Ya hay evidencia de la realidad de que cambia durante el día y durante el año.

14:02 – 14:07

¿Y si la Tierra, a medida que avanza a través del entorno galáctico, fue a través de manchas de materia oscura u otros factores ambientales que podrían alterar esto? Tal vez todos cambian juntos.

14:13 – 14:16

¿Qué pasa si estos errores aumentan y disminuyen juntos?

Desde hace más de 10 años he estado tratando de persuadir a los metrólogos mirar los datos en bruto.

14:21 – 14:24

De hecho, ahora estoy tratando de persuadirlos para ponerlo en línea en Internet, con las fechas y las mediciones reales, y ver si están correlacionados, para ver si todos aumentan en un momento, y disminuyen todos disminuyen en otro.

14:32 – 14:37

De serlo podrían estar fluctuando entre sí y eso nos diría algo muy, muy interesante. Pero nadie lo ha hecho, no lo han hecho porque G es una constante.

14:41 – 14:43

No hay porque buscar cambios. Verán, esto es un ejemplo muy simple de que una suposición dogmática en realidad inhibe la investigación.

14:49 – 14:54

Yo mismo creo que las constantes pueden variar considerablemente. Bueno, dentro de límites estrechos, pero todos ellos pueden ser variable.

14:57 – 15:02

Y creo en el día en que las revistas científicas como Nature tendrán informes semanales sobre las constantes como informes de mercado de valores en los periódicos.

15:05 – 15:12

Esta semana la Gran G fue ligeramente superior, la carga del electrón se redujo, la velocidad de la luz se mantuvo estable, y así sucesivamente.

15:16 – 15:25

Por lo tanto, es un área, sólo un área donde creo que pensar menos dogmáticamente podría abrir las cosas.

15:25 – 15:28

Una de las áreas más importantes es la naturaleza de la mente, este es el mayor problema sin resolver como Graham acaba de decir.

15:32 – 15:35

La ciencia simplemente no puede lidiar con el hecho de que somos conscientes. Y no puede lidiar con el hecho de que nuestros pensamientos no parecen estar dentro de nuestro cerebro.

15:43 – 15:46

Nuestras experiencias no parecen estar todas dentro de nuestro cerebro. La imagen que usted se hace de mí ahora no parece estar dentro de su cerebro.

15:50 – 15:54

Sin embargo, el punto de vista oficial es que hay un pequeño Rupert en algún lugar dentro de su cabeza y todo lo demás en esta sala está dentro de su cabeza. Sus experiencias se encuentra dentro de su cerebro.

16:00 – 16:04

Estoy sugiriendo en realidad que esa visión implica una proyección exterior de las imágenes, lo que esta viendo es en su mente, pero no dentro de tu cabeza.

16:08 – 16:12

Nuestras mentes se extienden más allá de nuestro cerebro en el simple acto de la percepción.

Creo que proyectamos las imágenes que estamos viendo estas imágenes tocan lo que estamos viendo.

16:19 – 16:24

¿Si le miro a usted por detrás y no sabes que estoy allí, podría afectarlo? ¿Podría sentir mi mirada? Hay una gran cantidad de evidencias de que la gente pueda.

16:29 – 16:32

La sensación de ser observado es una experiencia muy común, y la investigación experimental reciente sugiere que en realidad es real.

Los animales parecen tenerla tambien. Creo que probablemente evolucionó en el contexto de las relaciones depredador-presa.

16:42 – 16:47

Los animales de presa que puede sentir la mirada del depredador podrían tener mas chance de sobrevivir que los que no.

16:47 – 16:53

Esto daría lugar a una nueva forma de pensar acerca de las relaciones ecológicas entre depredadores y presas, también sobre el alcance de nuestras mentes.

16:55 – 17:01

Si miramos a las estrellas distantes, creo que nuestras mentes alcanzan en el sentido de tocar estas estrellas y, literalmente, se extienden a lo largo de diferentes distancias astronómicas.

17:05 – 17:08

No están sólo dentro de nuestras cabezas.

Ahora bien, puede parecer sorprendente que este sea un tema de debate en el siglo 21.

17:13 – 17:17

Sabemos tan poco acerca de nuestras propias mentes que donde están nuestras imágenes es un tema candente de debate en los estudios de conciencia en este momento.

17:22 – 17:28

No tengo tiempo para lidiar con más de estos dogmas, pero cada uno de ellos es cuestionable. Si se cuestiona, nuevas formas de investigación, se abren nuevas posibilidades.

17:33 – 17:38

Y creo que como nos cuestionemos estos dogmas que han frenado la ciencia tanto tiempo, la misma se someterá a un re-florecimiento, renacentista.

17:43 – 17:45

Yo soy un creyente total en la importancia de la ciencia.

He pasado toda mi vida como científico de investigación, toda mi carrera.Pero creo que yendo más allá de estos dogmas se puede regenerar.

De nuevo, sería interesante, y espero también, que afirme la vida.

Gracias.

 





The aim of this blog is to present to the public a ‘non-personal’ -and nonetheless suggestive- information that has already been released.

 

Cute, sexy, sweet…

dissabte, 10/11/2018
Dan Dennett · Philosopher, cognitive scientist.

Dan Dennett thinks that human consciousness and free will are the result of physical processes.

 

Transcripts

I’m going around the world giving talks about Darwin, and usually what I’m talking about is Darwin’s strange inversion of reasoning. Now that title, that phrase, comes from a critic, an early critic, and this is a passage that I just love, and would like to read for you.
“In the theory with which we have to deal, Absolute Ignorance is the artificer; so that we may enunciate as the fundamental principle of the whole system, that, in order to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it. This proposition will be found on careful examination to express, in condensed form, the essential purport of the Theory, and to express in a few words all Mr. Darwin’s meaning; who, by a strange inversion of reasoning, seems to think Absolute Ignorance fully qualified to take the place of Absolute Wisdom in the achievements of creative skill.”
Exactly. Exactly. And it is a strange inversion. A creationist pamphlet has this wonderful page in it: “Test Two: Do you know of any building that didn’t have a builder? Yes/No. Do you know of any painting that didn’t have a painter? Yes/No. Do you know of any car that didn’t have a maker? Yes/No. If you answered ‘Yes’ for any of the above, give details.”
A-ha! I mean, it really is a strange inversion of reasoning. You would have thought it stands to reason that design requires an intelligent designer. But Darwin shows that it’s just false.
Today, though, I’m going to talk about Darwin’s other strange inversion, which is equally puzzling at first, but in some ways just as important. It stands to reason that we love chocolate cake because it is sweet. Guys go for girls like this because they are sexy. We adore babies because they’re so cute. And, of course, we are amused by jokes because they are funny.
02:32This is all backwards. It is. And Darwin shows us why. Let’s start with sweet. Our sweet tooth is basically an evolved sugar detector, because sugar is high energy, and it’s just been wired up to the preferer, to put it very crudely, and that’s why we like sugar. Honey is sweet because we like it, not “we like it because honey is sweet.” There’s nothing intrinsically sweet about honey. If you looked at glucose molecules till you were blind, you wouldn’t see why they tasted sweet. You have to look in our brains to understand why they’re sweet. So if you think first there was sweetness, and then we evolved to like sweetness, you’ve got it backwards; that’s just wrong. It’s the other way round. Sweetness was born with the wiring which evolved.
03:33And there’s nothing intrinsically sexy about these young ladies. And it’s a good thing that there isn’t, because if there were, then Mother Nature would have a problem: How on earth do you get chimps to mate? Now you might think, ah, there’s a solution: hallucinations. That would be one way of doing it, but there’s a quicker way. Just wire the chimps up to love that look, and apparently they do. That’s all there is to it. Over six million years, we and the chimps evolved our different ways. We became bald-bodied, oddly enough; for one reason or another, they didn’t. If we hadn’t, then probably this would be the height of sexiness.
04:39

Our sweet tooth is an evolved and instinctual preference for high-energy food. It wasn’t designed for chocolate cake. Chocolate cake is a supernormal stimulus. The term is owed to Niko Tinbergen, who did his famous experiments with gulls, where he found that that orange spot on the gull’s beak — if he made a bigger, oranger spot the gull chicks would peck at it even harder. It was a hyperstimulus for them, and they loved it. What we see with, say, chocolate cake is it’s a supernormal stimulus to tweak our design wiring. And there are lots of supernormal stimuli; chocolate cake is one. There’s lots of supernormal stimuli for sexiness.
05:20

And there’s even supernormal stimuli for cuteness. Here’s a pretty good example. It’s important that we love babies, and that we not be put off by, say, messy diapers. So babies have to attract our affection and our nurturing, and they do. And, by the way, a recent study shows that mothers prefer the smell of the dirty diapers of their own baby. So nature works on many levels here. But now, if babies didn’t look the way they do — if babies looked like this, that’s what we would find adorable, that’s what we would find — we would think, oh my goodness, do I ever want to hug that. This is the strange inversion.
06:04

Well now, finally what about funny. My answer is, it’s the same story, the same story. This is the hard one, the one that isn’t obvious. That’s why I leave it to the end. And I won’t be able to say too much about it. But you have to think evolutionarily, you have to think, what hard job that has to be done — it’s dirty work, somebody’s got to do it — is so important to give us such a powerful, inbuilt reward for it when we succeed. Now, I think we’ve found the answer — I and a few of my colleagues. It’s a neural system that’s wired up to reward the brain for doing a grubby clerical job. Our bumper sticker for this view is that this is the joy of debugging. Now I’m not going to have time to spell it all out, but I’ll just say that only some kinds of debugging get the reward. And what we’re doing is we’re using humor as a sort of neuroscientific probe by switching humor on and off, by turning the knob on a joke — now it’s not funny … oh, now it’s funnier … now we’ll turn a little bit more … now it’s not funny — in this way, we can actually learn something about the architecture of the brain, the functional architecture of the brain.

Matthew Hurley is the first author of this. We call it the Hurley Model. He’s a computer scientist, Reginald Adams a psychologist, and there I am, and we’re putting this together into a book.

Thank you very much.

Viajo por el mundo dando charlas sobre Darwin, y generalmente de lo que hablo es de la extraña inversión de razonamiento de Darwin. Ese título, esa frase, proviene de un crítico, uno de los primeros, y este es un pasaje que adoro, y me gustaría leerlo para ustedes.
“En la teoría que nos presentan, La Ignorancia Absoluta es el artífice; de modo que debemos enunciar como principio fundamental del sistema, que, con el fin de crear un máquina perfecta y hermosa, no es un requisito saber cómo hacerla. Se encontrará, bajo cuidadoso examen, que esta proposición expresa en forma condensada, el propósito esencial de La Teoría, y para expresar en pocas palabras el mensaje del Sr. Darwin; quien, por una extraña inversión de razonamiento, parece creer que la Ignorancia Absoluta está plenamente calificada para reemplazar a la Sabiduría Absoluta en los logros de la facultad creadora”
Exactamente. Exactamente. Y es una extraña inversión. Un panfleto creacionista presenta esta maravillosa página: “Prueba Dos: ¿Conoces algún edificio que no tuviera un constructor? Sí – No. ¿Conoces alguna pintura que no tuviera un pintor? Sí – No. ¿Conoces algún automóvil que no tuviese fabricante? Sí – No. Si respondiste “SI” a alguna de las anteriores, provee detalles.”
¡Ajá! Es realmente una extraña inversión de razonamiento. Uno creería que es razonable pensar que un diseño requiere un diseñador inteligente. Pero Darwin muestra que esto es falso.
Hoy, sin embargo, voy a hablar de otra extraña inversión de Darwin, que es igual de confuso al inicio, pero de algún modo igual de importante Es razonable pensar que amamos el chocolate porque es dulce. Los chicos persiguen chicas porque son sexys. Adoramos los bebés porque son lindos. Y, por supuesto, nos divierten los chistes porque son graciosos.
02:32Todo esto está al revés. Y Darwin nos muestra porqué. Comencemos con lo dulce. Básicamente desarrollamos un detector de azúcar, porque el azúcar contiene energía, y fuimos forzados a preferirla, para decirlo crudamente, y es por eso que nos gusta el azúcar. La miel es dulce porque nos gusta, no “nos gusta la miel porque es dulce.” No hay nada intrínsecamente dulce en la miel. Si miran moléculas de glucosa hasta quedar ciegos, no podrán ver porqué saben dulce. Tienen que mirar en nuestro cerebro para entender porqué son dulces. Así que, si piensan que primero existió la dulzura, y luego evolucionamos para tener gusto por ella, lo están viendo al revés; están equivocados. Es lo contrario. Lo dulce nació al evolucionar las conexiones cerebrales.
03:33Y no hay nada intrínsecamente sexy en estas jóvenes. Y es algo bueno que no lo haya, porque si lo hubiese, la Madre Naturaleza tendría un problema; ¿Cómo hacer que los chimpancés encuentren pareja? Podrían pensar, ah, una solución: alucinaciones. Sería un modo de lograrlo, pero hay un modo más rápido. Forzar a los chimpancés a que amen esa apariencia, y aparentemente lo hacen. Eso es todo lo que se necesita. Por seis millones de años, nosotros y los chimpancés evolucionamos separados. Nos volvimos lampiños. Extrañamente; por una razón u otra, ellos no lo hicieron. Si no lo hubiésemos hecho, esto podría ser la cumbre del erotismo.
04:39

Nuestra glotonería es una preferencia evolutiva e instintiva por la comida energética, No fue diseñada para el pastel de chocolate. El pastel de chocolate es un estímulo supranormal. El término se lo debemos a Niko Tinbergen, quien hizo su famoso experimento con gaviotas, donde encontró que el punto naranja en el pico — si hacía un punto más grande, más naranja los pollitos de gaviota lo picarían con más ganas. Era un hiper-estímulo para ellos, y lo adoraban. Lo que vemos con, digamos, el pastel es que es un estímulo supranormal para nuestras preferencias forzadas. Y hay muchos estímulos supranormales; el pastel es uno. Hay estímulos supranormales para el erotismo.
05:20

Incluso estímulo supranormal para lo lindo. He aquí un buen ejemplo. Es importante que amemos los bebés, a pesar de, digamos, los pañales sucios. De modo que los bebés obtengan nuestro afecto y nutrición, y lo hacen. Y, a propósito, un estudio reciente muestra que las madres prefieren el olor de los pañales sucios de su propio bebé. Así que la naturaleza trabaja en muchos niveles aquí. Pero, si los bebés no se vieran como se ven, si los bebés se vieran así, eso es lo que nos parecería adorable, eso es lo que encontraríamos — pensaríamos, oh precioso, cómo quiero abrazarlo. Esta es una inversión extraña.
06:04

Finalmente, acerca de lo gracioso. Mi respuesta es, es la misma historia. Esta es la difícil, la que no es obvia. Es por eso que la dejé para el final. Y no podré decir mucho sobre ella. Pero tienen que pensar evolutivamente, deben pensar, qué difícil trabajo, es trabajo sucio, alguien tiene que hacerlo, es tan importante que obtenemos una poderosa recompensa innata por él. Creo que tengo la respuesta. Yo y algunos de mis colegas. Es un sistema neuronal diseñado para recompensar al cerebro por hacer un trabajo sucio. Nuestro lema para este enfoque es “Es el placer de la depuración de errores.” No tendré tiempo de detallarlo todo, pero diré que algunas clases de depuración obtienen recompensa. Y lo que estamos haciendo es usar el humor como una sonda neurocientífica encendiendo y apagando el humor, girando el interruptor en un chiste, ahora no es gracioso… ahora es más gracioso… ahora lo encendemos un poco más… ahora no es gracioso… de esta manera, podemos aprender algo. sobre la arquitectura del cerebro, la arquitectura funcional del cerebro.
Matthew Hurley es el principal autor de esto. Lo llamamos el Modelo Hurley. Él es un científico computacional, Reginal Adams es psicólogo, y estoy yo. y lo estamos juntando todo esto en un libro. Muchas gracias.

 




TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) és una societat de responsabilitat limitada estatunidenca que organitza un conjunt de conferències seguint el seu lema ideas worth spreading («idees que val la pena difondre»). La societat és propietat de la fundació sense ànim de lucre Sapling Foundation.




The aim of this blog is to present to the public a ‘non-personal’ -and nonetheless suggestive, information that has already been released.