Entrades amb l'etiqueta ‘bilingual’

Planets that could have alien life

dimecres, 13/02/2019

Is there life beyond Earth in our solar system? Wow, what a powerful question. You know, as a scientist — planetary scientist — we really didn’t take that very seriously until recently.

00:28

Carl Sagan always said, “It takes extraordinary evidence for extraordinary claims.” And the claims of having life beyond Earth need to be definitive, they need to be loud and they need to be everywhere for us to be able to believe it.

00:50

So how do we make this journey? What we decided to do is first look for those ingredients for life. The ingredients of life are: liquid water — we have to have a solvent, can’t be ice, has to be liquid. We also have to have energy. We also have to have organic material — things that make us up, but also things that we need to consume.

01:19

So we have to have these elements in envi-ronments for long periods of time for us to be able to be confident that life, in that moment when it starts, can spark and then grow and evolve.

01:35

Well, I have to tell you that early in my career, when we looked at those three elements, I didn’t believe that they were beyond Earth in any length of time and for any real quantity.

01:48

Why? We look at the inner planets. Venus is way too hot — it’s got no water. Mars — dry and arid. It’s got no water. And beyond Mars, the water in the solar system is all frozen.

02:03

But recent observations have changed all that. It’s now turning our attention to the right places for us to take a deeper look and really start to answer our life question.

02:18

So when we look out into the solar system, where are the possibilities? We’re concentrating our attention on four locations. The planet Mars and then three moons of the outer planets: Titan, Europa and small Enceladus.

02:38

So what about Mars? Let’s go through the evidence. Well, Mars we thought was initially moon-like: full of craters, arid and a dead world.

02:52

And so about 15 years ago, we started a series of missions to go to Mars and see if water existed on Mars in its past that changed its geology. We ought to be able to notice that. And indeed we started to be surprised right away. Our higher resolution images show deltas and river valleys and gulleys that were there in the past. And in fact, Curiosity — which has been roving on the surface now for about three years — has really shown us that it’s sitting in an ancient river bed, where water flowed rapidly. And not for a little while, perhaps hundreds of millions of years. And if everything was there, including organics, perhaps life had started.

03:43

Curiosity has also drilled in that red soil and brought up other material. And we were really excited when we saw that. Because it wasn’t red Mars, it was gray material, it’s gray Mars. We brought it into the rover, we tasted it, and guess what? We tasted organics — carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur — they were all there.

04:09

So Mars in its past, with a lot of water, perhaps plenty of time, could have had life, could have had that spark, could have grown. And is that life still there? We don’t know that.

04:24

But a few years ago we started to look at a number of craters. During the summer, dark lines would appear down the sides of these craters. The more we looked, the more craters we saw, the more of these features. We now know more than a dozen of them.

04:42

A few months ago the fairy tale came true. We announced to the world that we know what these streaks are. It’s liquid water. These craters are weeping during the summer. Liquid water is flow-ing down these craters. So what are we going to do now — now that we see the water? Well, it tells us that Mars has all the ingredients necessary for life. In its past it had perhaps two-thirds of its northern hemisphere — there was an ocean. It has weeping water right now. Liquid water on its surface. It has organics. It has all the right conditions.

05:24

So what are we going to do next? We’re going to launch a series of missions to begin that search for life on Mars. And now it’s more appealing than ever before.

05:35

As we move out into the solar system, here’s the tiny moon Enceladus. This is not in what we call the traditional habitable zone, this area around the sun. This is much further out. This object should be ice over a silicate core.

05:54

But what did we find? Cassini was there since 2006, and after a couple years looked back after it flew by Enceladus and surprised us all. Enceladus is blasting sheets of water out into the solar system and sloshing back down onto the moon. What a fabulous environment. Cassini just a few months ago also flew through the plume, and it measured silicate particles. Where does the silica come from? It must come from the ocean floor. The tidal energy is generated by Saturn, pulling and squeezing this moon — is melting that ice, creating an ocean. But it’s also doing that to the core.

06:40

Now, the only thing that we can think of that does that here on Earth as an analogy … are hy-drothermal vents. Hydrothermal vents deep in our ocean were discovered in 1977. Oceanographers were completely surprised. And now there are thousands of these below the ocean.

07:03

What do we find? The oceanographers, when they go and look at these hydrothermal vents, they’re teeming with life, regardless of whether the water is acidic or alkaline — doesn’t matter. So hydrothermal vents are a fabulous abode for life here on Earth.

07:20

So what about Enceladus? Well, we believe because it has water and has had it for a significant period of time, and we believe it has hydrothermal vents with perhaps the right organic material, it is a place where life could exist. And not just microbial — maybe more complex because it’s had time to evolve.

07:47

Another moon, very similar, is Europa. Galileo visited Jupiter’s system in 1996 and made fabulous observations of Europa. Europa, we also know, has an under-the-ice crust ocean. Galileo mission told us that, but we never saw any plumes. But we didn’t look for them.

08:13

Hubble, just a couple years ago, observing Europa, saw plumes of water spraying from the cracks in the southern hemisphere, just exactly like Enceladus.

08:29

These moons, which are not in what we call a traditional habitable zone, that are out in the solar system, have liquid water. And if there are organics there, there may be life.

08:43

This is a fabulous set of discoveries because these moons have been in this environment like that for billions of years. Life started here on Earth, we believe, after about the first 500 million, and look where we are. These moons are fabulous moons.

09:04

Another moon that we’re looking at is Titan. Titan is a huge moon of Saturn. It perhaps is much larger than the planet Mercury. It has an exten-sive atmosphere. It’s so extensive — and it’s mostly nitrogen with a little methane and ethane — that you have to peer through it with radar.

09:25

And on the surface, Cassini has found liquid. We see lakes … actually almost the size of our Black Sea in some places. And this area is not liquid water; it’s methane. If there’s any place in the solar system where life is not like us, where the substitute of water is another solvent — and it could be methane — it could be Titan.

09:54

Well, is there life beyond Earth in the solar sys-tem? We don’t know yet, but we’re hot on the pursuit. The data that we’re receiving is really exciting and telling us — forcing us to think about this in new and exciting ways. I believe we’re on the right track. That in the next 10 years, we will answer that question. And if we answer it, and it’s positive, then life is everywhere in the solar sys-tem. Just think about that. We may not be alone.
Thank you.
(Applause)

Hi ha vida més enllà de la Terra, al nostre sis-tema solar?Caram, quina pregunta més pode-rosa. Com a científics, com a planetòlegs, no ens ho havíem plantejat seriosament fins fa ben poc.

00:28

Carl Sagan sempre deia: “Les afirmacions extraordinàries necessiten proves extraor-dinàries”. Per afirmar que hi ha vida extraterrestre calen proves definitives, que siguin convincents i han d’estar per tot arreu perquè ens les creguem.

00:50

Com comencem aquest viatge? El que vam decidir és buscar, primer, els ingredients necessaris per a la vida. Aquests ingredients són: aigua líquida, hem de tenir un dissolvent, no pot ser gel, ha de ser líquid. També hi ha d’haver energia. I matèria orgànica, allò de què estem fets. però també el que hem de consumir.

01:19

Per tant, hem de tenir aquests elements en entorns durant molt de temps per poder estar segurs que la vida, quan comenci, pot sorgir, créixer i evolucionar.

01:35

Us he de dir que al principi, quan observàvem aquests tres elements, no pensava que existissin fora de la Terra durant el temps suficient o en quantitats significatives.

01:48

Per què? Fixem-nos en els planetes interiors. Venus és massa calent, no hi ha aigua. Mart: sec i àrid. Tampoc té aigua. I més enllà de Mart, tota l’aigua del sistema està congelada.

02:03

Però observacions recents ho han canviat tot. Ara ens centrem en els llocs adequats ho observem amb més atenció i podem comen-çar a respondre la pregunta de si hi ha vida.

02:18

Així que, si mirem el sistema solar, on n’hi podria haver? Ens centrem en quatre llocs. El planeta Mart i tres llunes dels planetes exteriors: Tità, Europa i la petita Encèlad.

02:38

Sobre Mart, què? Repassem l’evidència. Primer, crèiem que Mart era similar a la Lluna. ple de cràters, àrid i desolat.

02:52

I fa uns 15 anys, vam començar missions per anar a Mart i comprovar si havia tingut aigua que canviés la seva geologia. Havíem de ser capaços de notar-ho. I vam quedar sorpresos només començar. Les imatges mostraven deltes, valls fluvials i fondalades que van existir en el passat. I, de fet, Curiosity que ja fa uns tres anys que recorre el planeta ens ha mostrat que és en un antic llit d’un riu, en què l’aigua hi fluïa ràpidament. I no durant poc temps, potser durant centenars de milions d’anys. I si tot hi era, també matèria orgànica, potser hi va sorgir vida.

03:43

Curiosity també ha perforat el terra i ha extret altres materials. Ens vam emocionar, quan ho vam veure. Perquè no era vermell, era de color gris, el planeta gris. Ho vam portar al vehicle, vam treure’n mostres i sabeu què? Vam trobar-hi matèria orgànica. Carboni, hidrogen, oxigen, nitrogen, fòsfor, sofre… hi havia tot això.

04:09

Mart, en el passat, amb molta aigua, potser molt de temps, podria haver tingut vida, podria haver-hi sorgit, i haver crescut. I aquella vida encara hi és? No ho sabem.

04:24

Però fa uns anys vam començar a mirar alguns cràters. A l’estiu, apareixien línies fosques, baixant pels costats. Com més buscàvem, com més cràters miràvem, més línies trobàvem. N’hem trobat més d’una dotzena.

04:42

Fa uns mesos, l’impossible es va convertir en realitat. Vam fer públic que ja sabíem què eren aquestes línies. És aigua líquida. Els cràters ploren a l’estiu. Baixa aigua líquida pels cràters. Què farem ara, ara que veiem l’aigua? Bé, ens diu que Mart té els ingredients per tenir vida. En el passat, pot ser que, en dos terços de l’hemisferi nord hi hagués un oceà. Té aigua líquida ara mateix. Aigua líquida a la superfície. Té matèria orgànica. Té les condicions correctes.

05:24

Què farem ara, doncs? Iniciarem un seguit de missions per buscar vida a Mart. I ara la cerca és més atractiva que mai.

05:35

Si ens endinsem en el sistema solar, hi trobem la petita lluna Encèlad. No és la zona habitable tradicional, aquesta àrea al voltant del sol. Està molt més allunyada. Això hauria de ser de gel sobre un nucli de silicat.

05:54

Però què vam descobrir? Cassini era allà des del 2006, i després d’uns anys, va passar per Encèlad i ens va sorprendre a tots. Encèlad envia capes d’aigua cap al sistema solar que cauen un altre cop sobre la lluna. Quin entorn més fabulós. Cassini fa uns mesos, va trave-ssar la columna i va detectar partícules de silicat. D’on ve el silici? Ha de venir del fons de l’oceà. Saturn crea l’energia de la marea, atraient i estrenyent la lluna està desfent el gel, i creant un oceà. Però també ho fa al nucli.

06:40

Per ara, l’única cosa que sabem que fa això a la Terra, com a analogia són les fumaroles hidrotermals. Les fumaroles es van descobrir al fons de l’oceà al 1977. Els oceanògrafs es van sorprendre molt. I ara n’hi ha milers sota l’oceà.

07:03

Què hi descobrim? Les fumaroles hidrotermals, quan els oceanògrafs les observen, desborden vida, encara que l’aigua sigui àcida o alcalina, tant és. Les fumaroles són excel·lents per a la vida a la Terra.

07:20

I a Encèlad? Pensem que com que té aigua l’ha tingut durant molt de temps, i pensem que té fumaroles, potser amb la matèria orgànica adequada, és un lloc on hi pot haver vida. No només microbiana sinó també més complexa, perquè hi ha hagut temps per evolucionar.

07:47

Una altra lluna, molt similar, és Europa. Galileo va visitar Júpiter al 1996 i va aportar dades sobre Europa. Sabem que Europa té un oceà sota la capa de gel. La missió Galileo ho va mostrar, però no hem vist que expulsés res. Però tampoc no ho vam buscar.

08:13

El Hubble, fa un parell d’anys, mentre obser-vava Europa, va veure columnes d’aigua que sorgien de l’hemisferi sud, igual que a Encèlad.

08:29

Aquests satèl·lits, que no són a la zona habitable habitual, que són a la zona exterior del sistema, tenen aigua líquida. I si hi ha matèria orgànica, potser hi ha vida.

08:43

Són uns descobriments extraordinaris perquè aquests satèl·lits han estat en aquestes condicions durant milers de milions d’anys. La vida a la Terra va començar després dels primers 500 milions, i mireu on som ara. Aquestes llunes són meravelloses.

09:04

També observem un altre satèl·lit: Tità. Tità és una lluna enorme de Saturn. Probablement és més gran que Mercuri. Té una atmosfera extensa. És tan extensa… i és sobretot nitro-gen, amb una mica de metà i età que hi has de mirar a través amb radar.

09:25

A la superfície, Cassini hi ha trobat líquid. Hi veiem llacs de fet, en alguns llocs, gairebé de la mida del Mar Negre. Aquests llacs no són d’aigua líquida, són de metà. Si hi ha algun lloc al sistema solar, on la vida no és com la coneixem, on el substitut de l’aigua és un altre dissolvent, potser el metà, podria ser Tità.

09:54

Hi ha vida extraterrestre en el sistema solar? No ho sabem, encara, però ens hi estem apropant. Les dades que rebem són fasci-nants, i ens diuen, ens obliguen a pensar de manera completament diferent. Penso que anem pel bon camí. Que en 10 anys respon-drem la pregunta. I si ho aconseguim, i la resposta és afirmativa, aleshores hi ha vida per tot el sistema solar. Penseu-hi. Potser no estem sols.

Gràcies.

(Aplaudiments)

No one knows the answers

dilluns, 11/02/2019

Transcripts

On a typical day at school, endless hours are spent learning the answers to questions, but right now, we’ll do the opposite. We’re going to focus on questions where you can’t learn the answers because they’re unknown. I used to puzzle about a lot of things as a boy, for example: What would it feel like to be a dog? Do fish feel pain? How about insects? Was the Big Bang just an accident? And is there a God? And if so, how are we so sure that it’s a He and not a She? Why do so many innocent people and animals suffer terrible things? Is there really a plan for my life? Is the future yet to be written, or is it already written and we just can’t see it? But then, do I have free will? I mean, who am I anyway? Am I just a biological machine? But then, why am I conscious? What is consciousness? Will robots become conscious one day? I mean, I kind of assumed that some day I would be told the answers to all these questions. Someone must know, right? Guess what? No one knows. Most of those questions puzzle me more now than ever. But diving into them is exciting because it takes you to the edge of knowledge, and you never know what you’ll find there. So, two questions that no one on Earth knows the answer to.
(Music)

01:52

[How many universes are there?]
Sometimes when I’m on a long plane flight, I gaze out at all those mountains and deserts and try to get my head around how vast our Earth is. And then I re-member that there’s an object we see every day that would literally fit one million Earths inside it: the Sun. It seems impossibly big. But in the great scheme of things, it’s a pinprick, one of about 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy, which you can see on a clear night as a pale white mist stretched across the sky. And it gets worse. There are maybe 100 billion galaxies detectable by our telescopes. So if each star was the size of a single grain of sand, just the Milky Way has enough stars to fill a 30-foot by 30-foot stretch of beach three feet deep with sand. And the entire Earth doesn’t have enough beaches to represent the stars in the overall universe. Such a beach would continue for literally hundreds of millions of miles. Holy Stephen Hawking, that is a lot of stars. But he and other physicists now believe in a reality that is unimaginably bigger still. I mean, first of all, the 100 billion galaxies within range of our tele-scopes are probably a minuscule fraction of the total. Space itself is expanding at an accelerating pace. The vast majority of the galaxies are separating from us so fast that light from them may never reach us. Still, our physical reality here on Earth is intimately connected to those distant, invisible galaxies. We can think of them as part of our universe. They make up a single, giant edifice obeying the same physical laws and all made from the same types of atoms, electrons, protons, quarks, neutrinos, that make up you and me.However, recent theories in physics, including one called string theory, are now telling us there could be countless other universes built on different types of particles, with different properties, obeying different laws. Most of these universes could never support life, and might flash in and out of exis-tence in a nanosecond. But nonetheless, combined, they make up a vast multiverse of possible universes in up to 11 dimensions, featuring wonders beyond our wildest imagination. The leading version of string theory predicts a multiverse made up of 10 to the 500 unive-rses. That’s a one followed by 500 zeros, a number so vast that if every atom in our observable universe had its own universe, and all of the atoms in all those universes each had their own universe, and you repeated that for two more cycles, you’d still be at a tiny fraction of the total, namely, one trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillionth.

(Laughter)

But even that number is minuscule compared to another number: infinity. Some physicists think the space-time continuum is literally infinite and that it contains an infinite number of so-called pocket universes with varying properties. How’s your brain doing?Quantum theory adds a whole new wrinkle. I mean, the theory’s been proven true beyond all doubt, but interpreting it is baffling, and some physicists think you can only un-baffle it if you imagine that huge numbers of parallel universes are being spawned every moment, and many of these universes would actually be very like the world we’re in, would include multiple copies of you. In one such universe, you’d graduate with honors and marry the person of your dreams, and in another, not so much. Well, there are still some scientists who would say, hogwash. The only meaningful answer to the question of how many universes there are is one. Only one universe. And a few philosophers and mystics might argue that even our own universe is an illusion. So, as you can see, right now there is no agreement on this question, not even close. All we know is the answer is somewhere between zero and infinity.Well, I guess we know one other thing. This is a pretty cool time to be studying physics. We just might be undergoing the biggest paradigm shift in knowledge that humanity has ever seen.

(Music)

[Why can’t we see evidence of alien life?]

Somewhere out there in that vast universe there must surely be countless other planets teeming with life. But why don’t we see any evidence of it? Well, this is the famous question asked by Enrico Fermi in 1950: Where is everybody? Conspiracy theorists claim that UFOs are visiting all the time and the reports are just being covered up, but honestly, they aren’t very convincing. But that leaves a real riddle. In the past year, the Kepler space observatory has found hundreds of planets just around nearby stars. And if you extrapolate that data, it looks like there could be half a trillion planets just in our own galaxy. If any one in 10,000 has conditions that might support a form of life, that’s still 50 million possible life-harboring planets right here in the Milky Way. So here’s the riddle: our Earth didn’t form until about nine billion years after the Big Bang. Countless other planets in our galaxy should have formed earlier, and given life a chance to get underway billions, or certainly many millions of years earlier than happened on Earth. If just a few of them had spawned intelligent life and started creating technologies, those technologies would have had millions of years to grow in complexity and power. On Earth, we’ve seen how dramatically technology can accelerate in just 100 years. In millions of years, an intelligent alien civili-zation could easily have spread out across the galaxy, perhaps creating giant energy-harvesting artifacts or fleets of colonizing spaceships or glorious works of art that fill the night sky. At the very least, you’d think they’d be revealing their presence, deliberately or otherwise, through electromagnetic signals of one kind or another.

And yet we see no convincing evidence of any of it. Why? Well, there are numerous possible answers, some of them quite dark. Maybe a single, superintelligent civilization has indeed taken over the galaxy and has imposed strict radio silence because it’s paranoid of any potential compe-titors. It’s just sitting there ready to obliterate anything that becomes a threat. Or maybe they’re not that inte-lligent, or perhaps the evolution of an intelligence capa-ble of creating sophisticated technology is far rarer than we’ve assumed. After all, it’s only happened once on Earth in four billion years. Maybe even that was incre-dibly lucky. Maybe we are the first such civilization in our galaxy. Or, perhaps civilization carries with it the seeds of its own destruc-tion through the inability to control the technologies it creates. But there are numerous more hopeful answers. For a start, we’re not looking that hard, and we’re spending a pitiful amount of money on it. Only a tiny fraction of the stars in our galaxy have really been looked at closely for signs of interesting signals. And perhaps we’re not looking the right way. Maybe as civilizations develop, they quickly discover communi-cation technologies far more sophis-ticated and useful than electromagnetic waves. Maybe all the action takes place inside the mysterious recently discovered dark matter, or dark energy, that appear to account for most of the universe’s mass. Or, maybe we’re looking at the wrong scale. Perhaps intelligent civilizations come to realize that life is ultimately just complex patterns of information interacting with each other in a beautiful way, and that that can happen more efficiently at a small scale. So, just as on Earth, clunky stereo systems have shrunk to beautiful, tiny iPods, maybe intelligent life itself, in order to reduce its footprint on the enviro-nment, has turned itself micros-copic. So the Solar System might be teeming with aliens, and we’re just not noticing them. Maybe the very ideas in our heads are a form of alien life. Well, okay, that’s a crazy thought. The aliens made me say it. But it is cool that ideas do seem to have a life all of their own and that they outlive their creators. Maybe bio-logical life is just a passing phase. Well, within the next 15 years, we could start seeing real spec-troscopic information from pro-mising nearby planets that will reveal just how life-friendly they might be.

And meanwhile, SETI, the Search for Extrate-rrestrial Intelligence, is now releasing its data to the public so that millions of citizen scientists, maybe including you, can bring the power of the crowd to join the search. And here on Earth, ama-zing experiments are being done to try to create life from scratch, life that might be very different from the DNA forms we know. All of this will help us understand whether the universe is teeming with life or whether, indeed, it’s just us. Either answer, in its own way, is awe-inspiring, because even if we are alone, the fact that we think and dream and ask these questions might yet turn out to be one of the most important facts about the universe. And I have one more piece of good news for you. The quest for knowledge and understan-ding never gets dull. It doesn’t. It’s actually the opposite. The more you know, the more amazing the world seems. And it’s the crazy possibi-lities, the unanswered questions, that pull us forward. So stay curious.

En un dia normal de col·legi, passem hores intermi-nables aprenent respostes a preguntes, però ara mateix, farem el contrari. Ens centrarem en preguntes on no es pot aprendre la resposta perquè és desconeguda. Solia pensar en moltes coses quan era xiquet, per exemple: Com em sentiria si fos un gos? Els peixos senten dolor? I els insectes? El Big Bang va ser només un accident? Existeix Deu? I si és així, com podem estar segurs que és un deu i no una deessa? Per què tanta gent innocent i tants animals pateixen tant? Hi ha realment un pla per a la meua vida? El futur està per escriure, o ja ha estat escrit i simplement no el podem veure? Però aleshores, tinc lliure voluntat? Vull dir, qui sóc realment? Sóc no-més una màquina biològica? Però aleshores, per què tinc consciència? Què és la consciència? Els robots arri-baran a tindre consciència? Pensava que algun dia em dona-rien les respostes a totes aquestes preguntes. Algú ha de saber-les, no? Sabeu què? Ningú les sap. Moltes d’aquestes preguntes m’intriguen ara més que mai. Però explorar-les és emocionant perquè ens porta als límits del coneixement, i mai sabem el que hi trobarem. Així doncs, dues preguntes que ningú del món sap respondre.
(Música)

01:52

[Quants universos hi ha?]
De vegades durant un llarg vol mire totes eixes muntanyes i deserts i tracte de fer-me la idea de com de gran és la nostra Terra. I després recorde que hi ha un objecte que veiem tots els dies dins del qual caben literalment un milió de Terres: el Sol. Sembla impossiblement gran. Però en comparació, és el forat d’una agulla, un dels 400 mil milions d’estels de la Via Làctia, que pots veure en una nit clara com una boira pàl·lida i blanca estesa al llarg del cel. I encara més. Potser hi ha 100 mil milions de galàxies detectables pels nostres telescopis. Així que si cada estel fóra com un gra d’arena, hi ha prou estels a la Via Làctia per a omplir de sorra un tram de platja de 9 per 9 metres i d’un metre de fondària. I en tota la Terra no hi ha prou platges per a representar tots els estels de l’univers. Una platja així s’estendria cents de millions de metres. Per Stephen Hawking, això són molts estels! Però ell i altres físics creuen en una realitat que encara és inimaginablement més gran. Primer, els 100 mil milions de galàxies a l’abast dels nostres telescopis són probablement una minúscula fracció del total. L’espai mateix s’expandeix a un ritme accelerat. La gran majoria de galàxies s’allunyen de nosaltres tan ràpid que potser mai ens n’arribi la llum. Tanmateix, la nostra realitat física a la Terra està íntimament connectada a eixes galàxies distants i invisibles. Podem considerar-les part del nostre univers. Formen un sol edifici gegantí que obeeix les mateixes lleis físiques i és fet dels mateixos tipus d’àtoms, electrons, protons, quarks, neutrins, que ens formen a tu i a mi.Tanmateix, les teories recents en física, inclosa la Teoria de les Cordes, diuen que hi podria haver incomptables altres universos fets de diferents tipus de partícules, amb propietats diferents, i que obeeixen lleis diferents. Molts d’aquests universos potser mai puguin albergar vida, i potser apareixen i s’esvaeixen en un nanosegon. Però malgrat açò, combinats, formen un vast multivers d’universos possibles estesos en 11 dimensions, que ofereixen meravelles que no podem ni imaginar. La versió més acceptada de la Teoria de Cordes prediu un multivers format per 10 elevat a 500 universos. Açò és un 1 seguit de 500 zeros, un nombre tan gran que si cada àtom al nostre univers observable tinguera el seu univers propi, i tots els atoms d’eixos universos tingueren el seu univers propi, i repetires això per dos cicles més, encara estaries en una xicoteta fracció del total, és a dir, un trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió trilió del trilió.

(Rialles)

Però eixe nombre és encara minúscul comparat amb un altre nombre: infinit. Alguns físics pensen que el continu espai-temps és literalment infinit i que conté un nombre infinit dels anomenats unive-rsos de butxaca amb propietats variables. Com tens el cap?La teoria quàntica afegeix una nova capa. La teoria s’ha demostrat sense cap mena de dubte, però la seva interpretació és desconcertant, i alguns físics pensen que només es pot comprendre imaginant que un gran nombre d’universos paral·lels neixen a cada moment, i que molts d’aquests universos són proba-blement com el món on vivim, i inclouen múltiples còpies de tu. En un d’aquests universos t’has graduat amb matrícula i t’has casat amb la persona dels teus somnis, i en un altre, no. Encara hi ha científics que dirien “Ximpleries!” L’única resposta significativa a quants universos hi ha és un. Només un univers. I uns quants filòsofs i místics podrien argumentar que fins i tot el nostre univers és una il·lusió. Com podeu veure, ara mateix no hi ha un acord per a aquesta qüestió, ni de lluny. Tot el que sabem és que la resposta està entre zero i infinit. Crec que sabem una cosa més. És bon moment per estudiar física. Potser estem veient el major canvi de paradigma de coneixement que l’humanitat mai haja vist.

 

(Música)

[Per què no tenim proves de vida alienígena?]

En algun lloc d’aquest vast univers ha d’haver moltíssims planetes plens de vida. Però per què no en tenim cap prova? És la famosa pregunta que va fer Enrico Fermi el 1950: On està tothom? Els teòrics de la conspiració afirmen que els ovnis ens visiten cons-tantment però ens n’amaguen els informes. Però, realment, no són molt convincents. Però això ens deixa tot un misteri. L’any passat, l’observatori espacial Kepler va trobar cents de planetes al voltant d’estels propers. I si extrapoleu aquestes dades, sembla que podria haver-hi deu mil milions de planetes només a la nostra galàxia. Si 1 de cada 10,000 té condicions per a albergar alguna forma de vida, són 50 milion de possibles planetes portadors de vida ací a la Via Làctia mateix. Aquí rau el misteri: la nostra Terra no es va formar fins uns nou mil milions d’anys després del Big Bang. Abans s’haurien format incomptables planetes a la nostra galàxia, on hi podia haver començar la vida bilions, o molts milions d’anys abans que passara a la Terra. Si només uns quants hagueren desen-volupat vida intel·ligent i començat a crear tecnologies, eixes tecnologies haurien tingut milions d’anys per a créixer en complexitat i poder. A la Terra, hem vist com la tecnologia es pot accelerar dramàticament en només 100 anys. En milions d’anys, una civilització extraterrestre intel·ligent podria haver-se estès fàcilment per tota la galàxia, potser creant dispositius gegants per a obtenir energia o flotes de naus de colonització o glorioses obres d’art que omplin el cel nocturn. Almenys, s’entén que revelarien la seua presència, a propòsit o no, mitjançant senyals electro-magnètiques d’alguna mena.

 

No obstant això encara no n’hem vist cap prova convincent. Per què? Hi ha moltes respostes possibles, algunes una mica sinistres. Potser una sola civilització superintel·ligent ja haja dominat tota la galàxia i ha imposat un estricte silenci de ràdio perquè tem qualsevol competidor potencial. I tan sols espera, preparada per a neutralitzar qualsevol cosa que siga una amenaça. O potser no són tan intel·ligents, o potser l’evolució d’una intel·ligència capaç de crear tecnologia sofisticada és molt menys freqüent del que pensàvem. De fet, només ha passat una vegada a la Terra en quatre bilions d’anys. I potser això ha estat una sort increïble. Potser som la primera civilització d’eixe tipus a la nostra galàxia. O, potser la civilització comporta les llavors de la seua destrucció per la incapacitat de controlar les tecnologies que ha creat. Però hi ha moltes repostes més esperan-çadores. Per començar, no busquem gaire intensament, i hi invertim una miserable quantitat de diners. Només una petita fracció dels estels de la nostra galàxia han estat realment observats buscant-hi senyals interessants. I potser no estem buscant de la manera correcta. Potser a mesura que una civilització es desenvolupa, descobreix ràpidament tecnologies de comunicació més sofisticades i útils que les ones electromagnètiques. Potser tota la acció tinga lloc dins la misteriosa i recentment descoberta matèria fosca, o energia fosca, que sembla que forma la majoria de la massa de l’univers. O potser estem buscant a una escala incorrecta. Potser les civilitzacions intel·ligents s’adonaren que la vida tan sols són patrons d’informació complexos que interactuen entre ells d’una manera bella, i que això es pot produir més eficientment a petita escala. Com a la Terra els equips de música aparatosos s’han convertit en iPods petits i bufons, potser la vida intel·ligent, per reduir la seua empremta sobre l’entorn, ha esdevingut microscòpica. El Sistema Solar podria estar farcit d’extraterrestres, i simplement no els podem veure. Potser moltes de les idees que tenim al cap són formes de vida alienígena. D’acord, açò és una bogeria. Els extraterrestres m’han fet dir-ho. Però és apassionant que les idees semblin tindre vida pròpia i que sobre-visquin als seus creadors. Potser la vida biològica només és una fase transitòria. Dins dels propers 15 anys, podríem començar a veure informació espectroscòpica real dels planetes més propers i prometedors que en reveli en quina mesura poden albergar vida.

I mentre, SETI, (Búsqueda d’Inteligència Extraterrestre) fa pública la seua informació perquè milions de científics ciutadans, i tu mateix, puguin portar el poder de la multitud a aquesta recerca. I ací a la Terra, es fan experiments impressionants intentant crear vida des de zero, vida que podria ser diferent a les formes d’ADN que coneixem. Tot això ens ajudarà a comprendre si l’univers és farcit de vida o si, en realitat, estem sols. Qualsevol resposta, a la seua manera, ens meravellarà perquè, fins i tot si estem sols, el fet que pensem i somiem i ens fem aquestes preguntes podria convertir-se en un dels fets més importants de l’univers. I tinc una altra bona notícia. La recerca del coneixement i la comprensió mai es fa avorrida. Mai. Realment al contrari. Quant més saps, més impressionant sembla el món. I són les possibilitats esbojarrades, les preguntes sense respondre, el que ens empeny a avançar. Així que, manteniu-vos curiosos.

 

 


Fair use Notice: This website distributes this material without profit. This Information is for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

What reality are you creating for yourself?

dissabte, 9/02/2019

 TRANSCRIPT  Translated by Máximo Hernández
Reviewed by Lidia Cámara de la Fuente
When Dorothy was a little girl, she was fascinated by her goldfish. Her father explained to her that fish swim by quickly wagging their tails to propel themselves through the water. Without hesitation, little Dorothy responded, “Yes, Daddy, and fish swim backwards by wagging their heads”.(Laughter)

In her mind, it was a fact as true as any other. Fish swim backwards by wagging their heads. She believed it.Our lives are full of fish swimming backwards. We make assumptions and faulty leaps of logic. We harbor bias. We know that we are right, and they are wrong. We fear the worst. We strive for unattainable perfection. We tell ourselves what we can and cannot do. In our minds, fish swim by in reverse frantically wagging their heads and we don’t even notice them.

01:01

I’m going to tell you five facts about myself. One fact is not true. One: I graduated from Harvard at 19 with an honors degree in mathematics. Two: I currently run a construction company in Orlando. Three: I starred on a television sitcom. Four: I lost my sight to a rare genetic eye disease. Five: I served as a law clerk to two US Supreme Court justices. Which fact is not true? Actually, they’re all true. Yeah. They’re all true.

(Applause)

At this point, most people really only care about the television show.

(Laughter)

01:51

I know this from experience. OK, so the show was NBC’s “Saved by the Bell: The New Class.” And I played Weasel Wyzell, who was the sort of dorky, nerdy character on the show, which made it a very major acting challenge for me as a 13-year-old boy.

(Laughter)

02:15

Now, did you struggle with number four, my blindness? Why is that? We make assumptions about so-called disabilities. As a blind man, I confront others’ incorrect assumptions about my abilities every day. My point today is not about my blindness, however. It’s about my vision. Going blind taught me to live my life eyes wide open. It taught me to spot those backwards-swimming fish that our minds create. Going blind cast them into focus.

02:47

What does it feel like to see? It’s immediate and passive. You open your eyes and there’s the world. Seeing is believing. Sight is truth. Right? Well, that’s what I thought.

03:01

Then, from age 12 to 25, my retinas progressi-vely deteriorated. My sight became an increas-ingly bizarre carnival funhouse hall of mirrors and illusions. The salesperson I was relieved to spot in a store was really a mannequin. Reaching down to wash my hands, I suddenly saw it was a urinal I was touching, not a sink, when my fingers felt its true shape. A friend described the photograph in my hand, and only then I could see the image depicted. Objects appeared, morphed and disappeared in my reality. It was difficult and exhausting to see. I pieced together fragmented, transitory images, consciously analyzed the clues, searched for some logic in my crumbling kaleidoscope, until I saw nothing at all.

03:51

I learned that what we see is not universal truth. It is not objective reality. What we see is a unique, personal, virtual reality that is masterfully constructed by our brain.

04:07

Let me explain with a bit of amateur neuro-science. Your visual cortex takes up about 30 percent of your brain. That’s compared to approximately eight percent for touch and two to three percent for hearing. Every second, your eyes can send your visual cortex as many as two billion pieces of information. The rest of your body can send your brain only an additional billion. So sight is one third of your brain by volume and can claim about two thirds of your brain’s processing resources. It’s no surprise then that the illusion of sight is so compelling. But make no mistake about it: sight is an illusion.

04:45

Here’s where it gets interesting. To create the experience of sight, your brain references your conceptual understanding of the world, other knowledge, your memories, opinions, emotions, mental attention. All of these things and far more are linked in your brain to your sight. These linkages work both ways, and usually occur subconsciously. So for example, what you see impacts how you feel, and the way you feel can literally change what you see. Numerous studies demonstrate this. If you are asked to estimate the walking speed of a man in a video, for example, your answer will be different if you’re told to think about cheetahs or turtles. A hill appears steeper if you’ve just exercised, and a landmark appears farther away if you’re wearing a heavy backpack. We have arrived at a fundamental contradiction. What you see is a complex mental construction of your own making, but you experience it passively as a direct representation of the world around you. You create your own reality, and you believe it. I believed mine until it broke apart. The deterioration of my eyes shattered the illusion.

06:00

You see, sight is just one way we shape our reality. We create our own realities in many other ways. Let’s take fear as just one example. Your fears distort your reality. Under the warped logic of fear, anything is better than the uncertain. Fear fills the void at all costs, passing off what you dread for what you know, offering up the worst in place of the ambiguous, substituting assumption for reason. Psycholo-gists have a great term for it: awfulizing.

(Laughter)

Right? Fear replaces the unknown with the awful. Now, fear is self-realizing. When you face the greatest need to look outside yourself and think critically, fear beats a retreat deep inside your mind, shrinking and distorting your view, drowning your capacity for critical thought with a flood of disruptive emotions. When you face a compelling opportunity to take action, fear lulls you into inaction, enticing you to passively watch its prophecies fulfill themselves.

07:09

When I was diagnosed with my blinding disease, I knew blindness would ruin my life. Blindness was a death sentence for my independence. It was the end of achievement for me. Blindness meant I would live an unremarkable life, small and sad, and likely alone. I knew it. This was a fiction born of my fears, but I believed it. It was a lie, but it was my reality, just like those backwards-swimming fish in little Dorothy’s mind. If I had not confronted the reality of my fear, I would have lived it. I am certain of that.

07:51

So how do you live your life eyes wide open? It is a learned discipline. It can be taught. It can be practiced. I will summarize very briefly.

08:03

Hold yourself accountable for every moment, every thought, every detail. See beyond your fears. Recognize your assumptions. Harness your internal strength. Silence your internal critic. Correct your misconceptions about luck and about success. Accept your strengths and your weaknesses, and understand the difference. Open your hearts to your bountiful blessings.

08:29

Your fears, your critics, your heroes, your villains — they are your excuses, rationali-zations, shortcuts, justifications, your surrender. They are fictions you perceive as reality. Choose to see through them. Choose to let them go. You are the creator of your reality. With that empowerment comes complete responsibility.

08:58

I chose to step out of fear’s tunnel into terrain uncharted and undefined. I chose to build there a blessed life. Far from alone, I share my beautiful life with Dorothy, my beautiful wife, with our triplets, whom we call the Tripskys, and with the latest addition to the family, sweet baby Clementine.

09:22

What do you fear? What lies do you tell yourself? How do you embellish your truth and write your own fictions? What reality are you creating for yourself?

09:36

In your career and personal life, in your relationships, and in your heart and soul, your backwards-swimming fish do you great harm. They exact a toll in missed opportunities and unrealized potential, and they engender insecurity and distrust where you seek fulfillment and connection. I urge you to search them out.

09:59

Helen Keller said that the only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision. For me, going blind was a profound blessing, because blindness gave me vision. I hope you can see what I see.

Thank you.

(Applause)

Bruno Giussani:

Isaac, before you leave the stage, just a question. This is an audience of entrepreneurs, of doers, of innovators. You are a CEO of a company down in Florida, and many are probably wondering, how is it to be a blind CEO? What kind of specific challenges do you have, and how do you overcome them?

10:51

Isaac Lidsky:

Well, the biggest challenge became a blessing. I don’t get visual feedback from people.

(Laughter)

11:00

BG: What’s that noise there? IL: Yeah. So, for example, in my leadership team meetings, I don’t see facial expressions or gestures. I’ve learned to solicit a lot more verbal feedback. I basically force people to tell me what they think. And in this respect, it’s become, like I said, a real blessing for me personally and for my company, because we communicate at a far deeper level, we avoid ambiguities, and most important, my team knows that what they think truly matters.

BG: Isaac, thank you for coming to TED. IL: Thank you, Bruno.

(Applause)

Quan la Dorothy era petita, li fascinava el seu peix de colors. El seu pare li va explicar que els peixos naden agitant la cua ràpidament per a propulsar-se a través de l’aigua. Sense vacil·lar, la petita Dorothy va contestar, “Sí, Papa, i els peixos naden cap endarrere agitant el seu cap.”(Riallades)

En la seva ment, era un fet tan verdader com qualsevol altre. Els peixos naden cap endarrere agitant el seu cap. Ella ho creia així.Les nostres vides estan plenes de peixos nadant cap endarrere. Fem suposicions i arguments lògics incorrectes. Afavorim els prejudicis. Sabem que tenim la raó i que ells no. Tenim por del pitjor. Ens esforcem per la perfecció inabastable. Ens diem a nosaltres el que podem fer o no. En les nostres ments, els peixos naden cap enrere agitant frenèticament el seu cap i ni tan sols ens n’adonem.

01:01

Us vaig a explicar cinc fets sobre mi mateix. Un dels fets no és verdader. Un: Em vaig graduar a Harvard amb 19 anys amb grau d’honor en matemàtiques. Dos: Actualment dirigeixo una companyia de construcció a Orlando. Tres: Vaig protagonitzar una comèdia de televisió. Quatre: Vaig perdre la vista a causa d’una malaltia genètica de l’ull. Cinc: Vaig ser secretari judicial de dos Tribunals Suprems dels EEUU. Quin fet no és verdader? En realitat, tots són verdaders. Sí. Tots són verdaders.

(Aplaudiments)

En aquest punt, a molta gent només els hi importa el show de televisió.

(Riallades)

01:51

Ho sé per experiència. D’acord, el show era “Saved by the Bell: The New Class”, de la NBC. I vaig fer de Weasel Wyzell, qui era el típic personatge ximple i estudiós del programa, el que va fer que fos tot un desafiament d’actuació per a un noi de 13 anys com jo.

(Riallades)

02:15

Bé, heu tingut cap problema amb la quatre, la meva ceguesa? Per què? Fem suposicions sobre les anomenades discapacitats. Com un home cec, m’enfronto a les suposicions incorrectes dels altres sobre les meves habilitats tots els dies. Però no es tracta de la meva ceguesa. Es tracta de la meva visió. Ser cec m’ha ensenyat a viure la meva vida amb els ulls ben oberts. M’ha ensenyat a reco-nèixer els peixos que naden cap endarrere que creen les nostres ments. Ser cec els posa al centre d’atenció.

02:47

Com se sent veure? És immediat i passiu. Obriu els ulls i aquí està el món. Veure és creure. La vista és la veritat. Correcte? Bé, això és el que pensava.

03:01

Després, dels 12 als 25 anys, les meves retines es van anar deteriorant. La meva vista es tornava cada vegada més una estranya sala de fira de miralls i il·lusions. El venedor que creia haver reconegut a una botiga era realment un maniquí. Al ajupir-me per a rentar-me les mans, de sobte vaig veure que estava tocant un urinari, no una aigüera, quan els meus dits van sentir la forma real. Un amic descrivia la fotografia que tenia a la mà, i només així veia la imatge representada. Els objectes apareixien, es transformaven, i desapa-reixien en la meva realitat. Veure era difícil i esgotador. Ajuntava imatges fragmentades i transitòries, analitzava les pistes conscientment, buscava alguna lògica en el meu calidoscopi trencat, fins que no vaig veure res en absolut.

03:51

Vaig aprendre que el que veiem no és la veritat universal. No és una realitat objectiva. El que veiem és una realitat virtual, única i personal que és magis-tralment construïda pel nostre cervell.

04:07

Deixeu-me explicar-vos una mica de neurociència d’aficionats. El còrtex visual forma prop del 30 per cent del vostre cervell. Això comparat amb apro-ximadament un 8 per cent per al tacte i d’un 2 a un 3 per cent per a l’oïda. Cada segon, els vostres ulls poden enviar al vostre còrtex visual fins dos bil-ions de dades. La resta del vostre cos només pot enviar un bilió addicional. Així que la vista és un terç del vostre cervell en volum i pot demanar al voltant de dos terços dels recursos de processament del cervell. No és cap sorpresa que la il·lusió de la vista sigui tan irresistible. Però no us equivoqueu: la vista és una il·lusió.

04:45

Aquí es on es posa interessant. Per a crear l’experiència de la vista, el cervell pren referències de la teva comprensió conceptual del món, altres coneixements, els teus records, opinions, emocions, atenció mental. Totes aquestes coses i moltes més estan lligades al vostre cervell a la vostra vista. Aquests vincles treballen en ambdós sentits, normalment subconscientment. Per exemple, el que veus influeix en com et sents, i com et sents pot literalment canviar el que veus. Nombrosos estudis ho han demostrat. Si us demanaren fer una estimació de la velocitat a la que camina un home d’un vídeo, per exemple, la vostra resposta seria diferent si us pregunten per guepards o tortugues. Un turó sembla més pronunciat si acabes de fer exercici, i un lloc sembla més llunyà si portes una motxilla pesada. Hem arribat a una contradicció fonamental. El que veus és una construcció mental complexa que fabriques tu mateix però la vius passivament com una representació directa del món al teu voltant. Vosaltres feu la vostra pròpia realitat, i la creieu. Vaig creure la meva fins que es va trencar. El deteriorament dels meus ulls va destruir la il·lusió.

06:00

Veieu, la vista només és una de les maneres de donar forma a la nostra realitat. Creem les nostres pròpies realitats de moltes altres maneres. Agafeu la por com exemple. Els vostres temors distor-sionen la vostra realitat. Sota la lògica deformada de la por, qualsevol cosa és millor que l’incert. La por replena el buit costi el que costi, reemplaçant el que tems pel que saps, oferint el pitjor en lloc de l’ambigu, substituint suposicions per raó. Els psicòlegs tenen un terme genial per a això: “horrificació”

(Riallades)

Correcte? La por reemplaça el desconegut per l’horrible. La por se n’adona. Quan us enfronteu a la gran necessitat de mirar fora de vosaltres i pensar críticament, la por es bat en retirada al fons de la vostra ment, encongint i distorsionant la vostra visió, ofegant la vostra capacitat de pensar críticament amb una inundació d’emocions disruptives. Quan us enfronteu a una bona oportunitat d’actuar, la por us porta a la inacció, temptant-vos a mirar passivament com es compleixen les vostres profecies.

07:09

Quan vaig ser diagnosticat amb la meva ceguesa, vaig saber que la ceguesa arruïnaria la meva vida. La ceguesa va ser una sentència de mort per a la meva independència. Era la fi del meu èxit. La ceguesa significava que viuria una vida poc excepcional, petita i trista, i possiblement tot sol. Ho sabia. Aquest era una ficció nascuda dels meus temors, però ho creia. Era una mentida, però era la meva realitat, com aquells peixos que naden cap endarrere en la ment de la petita Dorothy. Si no hagués enfrontat la realitat del meu temor, l’hauria viscut. N’estic segur.

07:51

Doncs com podeu viure amb els ulls ben oberts? És una disciplina apresa. Pot ensenyar-se. Pot practicar-se. Us faré un breu resum.

08:03

Feu-vos responsables de tot moment, tot pensament, tot detall. Mireu enllà els vostres temors. Reconeixeu les vostres suposicions. Aprofiteu la vostra força interior. Calleu al vostre crític intern. Corregiu les idees equivocades que teniu sobre la sort i l’èxit. Accepteu les vostres fortaleses i febleses i compreneu la diferència. Obriu els vostres cors a les vostres abundants benediccions.

08:29

Els vostres temors, els vostres crítics, els vostres herois i vilans — són les vostres excuses, raciona-litzacions, dreceres, justificacions; la vostra rendició. Són ficcions que percebeu com realitat. Escolliu veure a través d’elles. Escolliu deixar-les anar. Sou els creador de la vostra realitat. Amb aquest empoderiment arriba una responsabilitat completa.

08:58

Vaig escollir sortir del túnel de la por cap al desconegut i l’indefinit. Vaig escollir construir allà una vida beneïda. Lluny d’estar sol, comparteixo la meva meravellosa vida amb la Dorothy, la meva preciosa dona, amb els nostres trigèmins, als que anomenen els Tripskys, i amb la nostra última addició a la família, la dolça bebé Clementine.

09:22

De què teniu por? Quines mentides us dieu a vosaltres mateixos? Com adorneu la vostra veritat i escriviu les vostres ficcions? Quina realitat esteu creant per a vosaltres mateixos?

09:36

En la vostra carrera i vida personal, en les vostres relacions, i en el vostre cor i ànima, els peixos que naden cap endarrere us faran molt mal. Imposen un peatge en oportunitats perdudes i potencial desaprofitat, i generen inseguretat i desconfiança on busqueu realització i connexió. Us animo a buscar-les.

09:59

Helen Keller va dir que l’única cosa pitjor que ser cec és tenir vista però no visió. Per a mi, quedar-me cec va ser una profunda benedicció, perquè la ceguesa em va donar visió. Espero que podeu veure el que jo veig.

Gràcies.

(Aplaudiments)

[Bruno Giussani]: Isaac, abans que deixes l’escenari, una pregunta. Aquest és un públic d’emprenedors, d’executors, d’innovadors. Ets el director executiu d’una companyia a Florida i molts probablement es pregunten, com és ser un director executiu cec? Quins desafiaments trobes, i com els superes?

10:51

[Isaac Lidsky]: Bé, el desafiament més gran es va tornar una benedicció. No obtinc reacció visual de la gent.

(Riallades)

11:00

[B.G.]: Què és aquest soroll? [I.L.]: Sí. Així, per exemple, en les reunions del meu equip de direcció, no veig les expressions facials o els gestos. He aprés a demanar molta més informació verbal. Bàsicament, forço a la gent a dir-me el que pensen. Quant a això, s’ha convertir, com he dit abans, en una benedicció per a mi i la meva companyia, perquè ens comuniquem a un nivell extremadament més profund, evitem ambigüitats, i el més important, el meu equip sap que el que ells pensen realment importa.

[B.G.]: Isaac, gràcies per vindre a TED. [I.L.]: Gràcies, Bruno.

(Aplaudiments)

Explaining consciousness | David Chalmers

dilluns, 21/01/2019

 

Right now you have a movie playing inside your head. It’s an amazing multi-track movie. It has 3D vision and surround sound for what you’re seeing and hearing right now, but that’s just the start of it. Your movie has smell and taste and touch. It has a sense of your body, pain, hunger, orgasms. It has emotions, anger and happiness. It has memories, like scenes from your childhood playing before you. And it has this constant voiceover narrative in your stream of conscious thinking. At the heart of this movie is you experiencing all this directly. This movie is your stream of consciousness, the subject of experience of the mind and the world.
01:23

Consciousness is one of the fundamental facts of human existence. Each of us is conscious. We all have our own inner movie, you and you and you. There’s nothing we know about more directly. At least, I know about my consciousness directly. I can’t be certain that you guys are conscious.
01:47

Consciousness also is what makes life worth living. If we weren’t conscious, nothing in our lives would have meaning or value. But at the same time, it’s the most mysterious phenomenon in the universe. Why are we conscious? Why do we have these inner movies? Why aren’t we just robots who process all this input, produce all that output, without experiencing the inner movie at all? Right now, nobody knows the answers to those questions. I’m going to suggest that to integrate consciousness into science, some radical ideas may be needed.
02:31

Some people say a science of consciousness is impossible. Science, by its nature, is objective. Consciousness, by its nature, is subjective. So there can never be a science of consciousness. For much of the 20th century, that view held sway. Psychologists studied behavior objectively, neuroscientists studied the brain objectively, and nobody even mentioned consciousness. Even 30 years ago, when TED got started, there was very little scientific work on consciousness.
03:09

Now, about 20 years ago, all that began to change. Neuroscientists like Francis Crick and physicists like Roger Penrose said now is the time for science to attack consciousness. And since then, there’s been a real explosion, a flowering of scientific work on consciousness. And this work has been wonderful. It’s been great. But it also has some fundamental limitations so far. The centerpiece of the science of consciousness in recent years has been the search for correlations, correlations between certain areas of the brain and certain states of consciousness. We saw some of this kind of work from Nancy Kanwisher and the wonderful work she presented just a few minutes ago. Now we understand much better, for example, the kinds of brain areas that go along with the conscious experience of seeing faces or of feeling pain or of feeling happy. But this is still a science of correlations. It’s not a science of explanations. We know that these brain areas go along with certain kinds of conscious experience, but we don’t know why they do. I like to put this by saying that this kind of work from neuroscience is answering some of the questions we want answered about consciousness, the questions about what certain brain areas do and what they correlate with. But in a certain sense, those are the easy problems. No knock on the neuroscientists. There are no truly easy problems with consciousness. But it doesn’t address the real mystery at the core of this subject: why is it that all that physical processing in a brain should be accompanied by consciousness at all? Why is there this inner subjective movie? Right now, we don’t really have a bead on that.
05:13

And you might say, let’s just give neuroscience a few years. It’ll turn out to be another emergent phenomenon like traffic jams, like hurricanes, like life, and we’ll figure it out. The classical cases of emergence are all cases of emergent behavior, how a traffic jam behaves, how a hurricane functions, how a living organism reproduces and adapts and metabolizes, all questions about objective functioning. You could apply that to the human brain in explaining some of the behaviors and the functions of the human brain as emergent phenomena: how we walk, how we talk, how we play chess, all these questions about behavior. But when it comes to consciousness, questions about behavior are among the easy problems. When it comes to the hard problem, that’s the question of why is it that all this behavior is accompanied by subjective experience? And here, the standard paradigm of emergence, even the standard paradigms of neuroscience, don’t really, so far, have that much to say.
06:28

Now, I’m a scientific materialist at heart. I want a scientific theory of consciousness that works, and for a long time, I banged my head against the wall looking for a theory of consciousness in purely physical terms that would work. But I eventually came to the conclusion that that just didn’t work for systematic reasons. It’s a long story, but the core idea is just that what you get from purely reductionist explanations in physical terms, in brain-based terms, is stories about the functioning of a system, its structure, its dynamics, the behavior it produces, great for solving the easy problems — how we behave, how we function — but when it comes to subjective experience — why does all this feel like something from the inside? — that’s something fundamentally new, and it’s always a further question. So I think we’re at a kind of impasse here. We’ve got this wonderful, great chain of explanation, we’re used to it, where physics explains chemistry, chemistry explains biology, biology explains parts of psychology. But consciousness doesn’t seem to fit into this picture. On the one hand, it’s a datum that we’re conscious. On the other hand, we don’t know how to accommodate it into our scientific view of the world. So I think consciousness right now is a kind of anomaly, one that we need to integrate into our view of the world, but we don’t yet see how. Faced with an anomaly like this, radical ideas may be needed, and I think that we may need one or two ideas that initially seem crazy before we can come to grips with consciousness scientifically.
08:25

Now, there are a few candidates for what those crazy ideas might be. My friend Dan Dennett, who’s here today, has one. His crazy idea is that there is no hard problem of consciousness. The whole idea of the inner subjective movie involves a kind of illusion or confusion. Actually, all we’ve got to do is explain the objective functions, the behaviors of the brain, and then we’ve explained everything that needs to be explained. Well I say, more power to him. That’s the kind of radical idea that we need to explore if you want to have a purely reductionist brain-based theory of consciousness. At the same time, for me and for many other people, that view is a bit too close to simply denying the datum of consciousness to be satisfactory. So I go in a different direction. In the time remaining, I want to explore two crazy ideas that I think may have some promise.
09:26

The first crazy idea is that consciousness is fundamental. Physicists sometimes take some aspects of the universe as fundamental building blocks: space and time and mass. They postulate fundamental laws governing them, like the laws of gravity or of quantum mechanics. These fundamental properties and laws aren’t explained in terms of anything more basic. Rather, they’re taken as primitive, and you build up the world from there. Now sometimes, the list of fundamentals expands. In the 19th century, Maxwell figured out that you can’t explain electromagnetic phenomena in terms of the existing fundamentals — space, time, mass, Newton’s laws — so he postulated fundamental laws of electromagnetism and postulated electric charge as a fundamental element that those laws govern. I think that’s the situation we’re in with consciousness. If you can’t explain consciousness in terms of the existing fundamentals — space, time, mass, charge — then as a matter of logic, you need to expand the list. The natural thing to do is to postulate consciousness itself as something fundamental, a fundamental building block of nature. This doesn’t mean you suddenly can’t do science with it. This opens up the way for you to do science with it. What we then need is to study the fundamental laws governing consciousness, the laws that connect consciousness to other fundamentals: space, time, mass, physical processes. Physicists sometimes say that we want fundamental laws so simple that we could write them on the front of a t-shirt. Well I think something like that is the situation we’re in with consciousness. We want to find fundamental laws so simple we could write them on the front of a t-shirt. We don’t know what those laws are yet, but that’s what we’re after.
11:35

The second crazy idea is that consciousness might be universal. Every system might have some degree of consciousness. This view is sometimes called panpsychism: pan for all, psych for mind, every system is conscious, not just humans, dogs, mice, flies, but even Rob Knight’s microbes, elementary particles. Even a photon has some degree of consciousness. The idea is not that photons are intelligent or thinking. It’s not that a photon is wracked with angst because it’s thinking, “Aww, I’m always buzzing around near the speed of light. I never get to slow down and smell the roses.” No, not like that. But the thought is maybe photons might have some element of raw, subjective feeling, some primitive precursor to consciousness.
12:33

This may sound a bit kooky to you. I mean, why would anyone think such a crazy thing? Some motivation comes from the first crazy idea, that consciousness is fundamental. If it’s fundamental, like space and time and mass, it’s natural to suppose that it might be universal too, the way they are. It’s also worth noting that although the idea seems counter-intuitive to us, it’s much less counterintuitive to people from different cultures, where the human mind is seen as much more continuous with nature.
13:07

A deeper motivation comes from the idea that perhaps the most simple and powerful way to find fundamental laws connecting consciousness to physical processing is to link consciousness to information. Wherever there’s information processing, there’s consciousness. Complex information processing, like in a human, complex consciousness. Simple information processing, simple consciousness.
13:31

A really exciting thing is in recent years a neuroscientist, Giulio Tononi, has taken this kind of theory and developed it rigorously with a mathematical theory. He has a mathematical measure of information integration which he calls phi, measuring the amount of information integrated in a system. And he supposes that phi goes along with consciousness. So in a human brain, incredibly large amount of information integration, high degree of phi, a whole lot of consciousness. In a mouse, medium degree of information integration, still pretty significant, pretty serious amount of consciousness. But as you go down to worms, microbes, particles, the amount of phi falls off. The amount of information integration falls off, but it’s still non-zero. On Tononi’s theory, there’s still going to be a non-zero degree of consciousness. In effect, he’s proposing a funda-mental law of consciousness: high phi, high cons-ciousness. Now, I don’t know if this theory is right, but it’s actually perhaps the leading theory right now in the science of consciousness, and it’s been used to integrate a whole range of scientific data, and it does have a nice property that it is in fact simple enough you can write it on the front of a t-shirt.
14:49

Another final motivation is that panpsychism might help us to integrate consciousness into the physical world. Physicists and philosophers have often observed that physics is curiously abstract. It describes the structure of reality using a bunch of equations, but it doesn’t tell us about the reality that underlies it. As Stephen Hawking puts it, what puts the fire into the equations? Well, on the panpsychist view, you can leave the equations of physics as they are, but you can take them to be describing the flux of consciousness. That’s what physics really is ultimately doing, describing the flux of consciousness. On this view, it’s consciousness that puts the fire into the equations. On that view, consciousness doesn’t dangle outside the physical world as some kind of extra. It’s there right at its heart.
15:44

This view, I think, the panpsychist view, has the potential to transfigure our relationship to nature, and it may have some pretty serious social and ethical consequences. Some of these may be counterintuitive. I used to think I shouldn’t eat anything which is conscious, so therefore I should be vegetarian. Now, if you’re a panpsychist and you take that view, you’re going to go very hungry. So I think when you think about it, this tends to transfigure your views, whereas what matters for ethical purposes and moral considerations, not so much the fact of consciousness, but the degree and the complexity of consciousness.
16:27

It’s also natural to ask about consciousness in other systems, like computers. What about the artificially intelligent system in the movie “Her,” Samantha? Is she conscious? Well, if you take the informational, panpsychist view, she certainly has complicated information processing and integration, so the answer is very likely yes, she is conscious. If that’s right, it raises pretty serious ethical issues about both the ethics of developing intelligent computer systems and the ethics of turning them off.
17:00

Finally, you might ask about the consciousness of whole groups, the planet. Does Canada have its own consciousness? Or at a more local level, does an integrated group like the audience at a TED conference, are we right now having a collective TED consciousness, an inner movie for this collective TED group which is distinct from the inner movies of each of our parts? I don’t know the answer to that question, but I think it’s at least one worth taking seriously.
17:32

Okay, so this panpsychist vision, it is a radical one, and I don’t know that it’s correct. I’m actually more confident about the first crazy idea, that consciousness is fundamental, than about the second one, that it’s universal. I mean, the view raises any number of questions, has any number of challenges, like how do those little bits of consciousness add up to the kind of complex consciousness we know and love. If we can answer those questions, then I think we’re going to be well on our way to a serious theory of consciousness. If not, well, this is the hardest problem perhaps in science and philosophy. We can’t expect to solve it overnight. But I do think we’re going to figure it out eventually. Understanding consciousness is a real key, I think, both to understanding the universe and to understanding ourselves. It may just take the right crazy idea.

Thank you.

(Applause)

En este momento hay una película que se proyecta en sus mentes. Es una película multitrack increíble. Está en 3D y tiene sonido surround de lo que escuchan y ven ahora mismo. Pero eso es sólo el comienzo. Tu película tiene aroma, sabor y textura. Siente tu cuerpo, tu dolor, tu hambre, tu placer. Tiene emociones, enojo y felici-dad. Tiene recuerdos, como momentos de tu infancia que se proyectan ante tus ojos. Y tiene constantemente una voz superpuesta en tu flujo de pensamiento cons-ciente. El corazón de la película eres tú quien experi-menta todo en directo. Esta película es tu flujo de con-ciencia, el sujeto de la experiencia de la mente y del mundo.
01:22

La conciencia es una de las verdades fundamen-tales de la existencia del ser humano. Cada uno de nosotros es consciente. Todos tenemos una película interna propia, tú, tú y tú. No hay nada que conozcamos más directa-mente. Por lo menos, yo sé que tengo una conciencia propia. No tengo certeza de que Uds. sean conscientes.
01:47

La conciencia también es la razón de vivir. Si no fué-ramos conscientes, nada en nuestras vidas tendría sentido o valor. Pero al mismo tiempo es el fenómeno más misterioso del universo. ¿Por qué somos conscien-tes? ¿Por qué tenemos estas películas internas? ¿Por qué no somos sólo robots que procesamsos lo que recibimos para producir resultados sin experimentar la película interna? En este momento, nadie sabe las res-puestas a esas preguntas. Sugiero que para integrar la conciencia a la ciencia, se necesitan algunas ideas radicales.
02:31

Algunas personas dicen que es imposible una ciencia de la conciencia. La ciencia, por naturaleza, es objetiva. La conciencia, por naturaleza, es subjetiva. Entonces nunca puede existir una ciencia de la con-ciencia. Porque durante casi todo el siglo XX, predominó esa visión. La psicología estudiaba el comportamiento objetivamente, La neurociencia estudiaba el cerebro objetivamente, pero nunca nadie mencionó la conciencia. Incluso hace 30 años, cuando TED comenzó, había muy pocos trabajos científicos sobre la conciencia.
03:09

Despues, hace 20 años, todo comenzó a cambiar. Neurocientíficos como Francis Crick y físicos como Roger Penrose dijeron: “ahora es el momento para que la ciencia aborde la conciencia”. Y desde enton-ces, hubo una verdadera explosión, un floreci-miento del trabajo científico sobre la conciencia. Y este trabajo fue fantástico. Fue genial. Pero también tiene limitaciones fundamentales hasta el momen-to. El centro de la ciencia de la conciencia en los años recientes fue la búsqueda de correlaciones, correlaciones entre algunas áreas del cerebro y algunos estados de la conciencia. Vimos algo de este tipo en el fantástico trabajo que presentó Nancy Kanwisher hace unos minutos. Ahora entendemos mucho mejor, por ejemplo, las áreas del cerebro que están relacionadas con la experiencia consciente de ver caras o de sentir dolor o de sentirse feliz. Pero esta sigue siendo una ciencia de correlaciones. No es una ciencia de explicaciones. Sabemos que estas áreas del cerebro están relacionadas con ciertos tipos de experiencias conscientes, pero no sabemos por qué. Me gustaría explicarlo diciendo que este tipo de trabajo de la neurociencia responde algunas preguntas que queremos que explique la conciencia. Las preguntas sobre lo que hacen ciertas áreas del cerebro y con qué se correlacionan. Pero en un sentido, esos son los problemas fáciles, sin ofender a los neurocientíficos. En realidad, no hay proble-mas fáciles con la conciencia. Pues no aborda el verdadero misterio central de esta materia: ¿Por qué todo proceso físico en el cerebro tiene que estar acompañado por la conciencia? ¿Por qué existe una película interna subjetiva? En este momento, no lo podemos entender.
05:13

Y Uds. pueden decir, démosle unos años a la neuro-ciencia. Se va a convertir en otro fenómeno emergente como los embotellamientos, como los huracanes, como la vida, y vamos a encontrar explicación. Los surgi-mientos típicos son todos casos de comportamientos emergentes, cómo operan los embotellamientos, cómo funcionan los huracanes, cómo se reproducen, se adaptan y metabolizan los organismos vivos. Todas son preguntas sobre el funcionamiento objetivo. Eso se podría aplicar al cerebro humano para explicar algunos comportamientos y las funciones del cerebro humano como un fenómeno emergente: cómo caminamos, cómo hablamos, cómo jugamos ajedrez; todas son preguntas sobre el comporta-miento. Pero cuando se trata de la conciencia, las preguntas sobre el comportamiento están entre los problemas fáciles. Pero el problema difícil, es la pregunta de ¿por qué es que todo comportamiento está acompañado de una experiencia subjetiva? Y aquí está, el paradigma estándar del surgimiento, el paradigma estándar de la neurociencia, en realidad todavía no tiene mucho que decir.
06:28

Yo soy un materialista científico de corazón. Quiero una teoría científica de la autoreflexión que funcione. Durante mucho tiempo, me golpeaba la cabeza contra la pared buscando una teoría de la conciencia en puros términos físicos que funcionara. Pero al final llegué a la conclusión que eso no funcionaba por razones sistemáticas. Es una larga historia, pero la idea es que lo que consigues a partir de explicaciones puramente reduccionistas en términos físicos, en términos basados en el cerebro, son historias sobre el funcionamiento de un sistema; su estructura, su dinámica, el comporta-miento que produce. Genial para resolver problemas fáciles: cómo nos comportamos, cómo funcionamos. Pero cuando se trata de experiencia subjetiva, ¿por qué todo se siente como si proviniera de adentro? Eso es algo fundamen-talmente nuevo, y es siempre una pregunta para más adelante. Creo que nos estancamos en este punto. Tenemos una cadena de explicaciones maravillosa, genial. Nos acostumbramos a esto; la física explica la química, la química explica la biología, la biología explica parte de la psicología. Pero la conciencia no parece encajar en este esquema. Por un lado, es un hecho que somos conscientes. Por otro, no sabemos cómo acomodar esa idea a nuestra visión científica del mundo. Creo que la conciencia, ahora mismo, es una especie de anomalía, algo que nece-sitamos integrar a nuestra visión del mundo, pero no sabemos todavía cómo. Con una anomalía como esta, se pueden necesitar ideas radicales. Creo que necesi-tamos ideas que al principio parecerán locas, antes de poder lidiar con la conciencia de una manera científica.
08:25

Hay algunas posibilidades para esas ideas locas. Mi amigo Dan Dennett, que está aquí hoy, tiene una. Su idea loca es que no existe tal problema difícil de la conciencia. Toda la idea de la película subjetiva interna incluye una especie de ilusión o confusión. En realidad, lo que hay que hacer, es explicar las funciones objetivas, los comportamientos del cerebro. Y así se estudia todo lo que necesita explicación. Bueno, más poder para él. Ese es el tipo de idea radical que necesitamos explorar si queremos tener una teoría de la conciencia puramente reduccionista, basada en el cerebro. Al mismo tiempo, para mí y para muchos otros, esa visión está bastante cercana a simplemente negar que la observación de la conciencia sea satisfactoria. Pero yo voy en una dirección diferente. En el tiempo que queda, quiero explorar dos ideas locas que creo pueden ser prometedoras.
09:26

La primera idea loca es que la conciencia es fundamental. Los físicos a veces toman algunos aspectos del universo como ladrillos fundamentales: el espacio, el tiempo y la masa. Postulan leyes fundamentales que los gobiernan, como las leyes de gravedad o de mecánica cuántica. Estas leyes y propiedades fundamentales no se explican en términos de nada más básico. Al contrario, se consideran fundamentales, y de ahí se construye el mundo. A veces, la lista de lo fundamental se alarga. En el siglo XIX Maxwell descubrió que no se pueden explicar los fenómenos electromagnéticos en términos de conceptos fundamentales preexistentes, espacio, tiempo, masa, leyes de Newton. Entonces postuló las leyes básicas del electromagnetismo. Y postuló la carga eléctrica como un concepto fundamental que esas leyes gobiernan. Creo que esa es la situación en que nos encontramos con la conciencia. Si no se puede explicar la conciencia en términos de ideas fundamentales preexistentes, espacio, tiempo, masa, carga, entonces por cuestión de lógica, hay que alargar la lista. Lo más natural sería postular la conciencia misma como algo fundamental, un ladrillo fundamental de la naturaleza. Esto no significa que de repente no sea objeto de la ciencia, sino que abre el camino para manejarla científica-mente. Entonces lo que necesitamos es estudiar las leyes fundamentales que gobiernan la conciencia, las leyes que conectan la conciencia con otros conceptos fundamentales: el espacio, el tiempo, la masa, procesos físicos. Los físicos a veces dicen que queremos leyes fundamentales tan simples que las podamos estampar en una remera. La situación de la conciencia es algo así. Queremos encontrar leyes fundamentales tan simples que las podamos estampar en una camiseta. Todavía no sabemos qué leyes son, pero eso es lo que buscamos.

11:35

La segunda idea loca es que la conciencia puede ser universal. Cada sistema puede tener un grado de conciencia. Esta visión a veces se llama panpsiquismo: “Pan” por todos, “psiqui” por mente, cada sistema es consciente, no solamente los humanos, los perros, los ratones, las moscas, incluso los microbios de Rob Knight, las partículas elementales. Incluso un fotón tiene algún grado de conciencia. La idea no es que los fotones sean inteligentes o que piensen. No es que un fotón pueda estar lleno de angustia cuando piensa “Ay, siempre viajando a la velocidad de la luz. Nunca puedo desa-celerar y oler las rosas”. No, así no. Pero el pensamiento es que quizás los fotones pueden tener algún elemento de sentimiento crudo, subjetivo, algún precursor primitivo de la conciencia.
12:33

Esto puede sonar un poco loco para Uds. ¿Cómo alguien pensaría algo tan loco? En parte esto proviene de la primera idea loca, que la conciencia es algo fundamen-tal. Si es fundamental, como el espacio, el tiempo y la masa, es natural suponer que también puede ser univer-sal, igual que los otros. También vale la pena notar que aunque la idea nos parece ilógica, lo es mucho menos para las personas de culturas diferentes, donde la mente humana parece más un continuo con la naturaleza.
13:07

Una razón más profunda proviene de la idea de que quizás la forma más simple y poderosa de encontrar leyes fundamentales que relacionen el pensamiento con el proceso físico, es vinculando la conciencia con la información. Siempre que hay procesamiento de infor-mación, hay conciencia. Procesamiento de infomación compleja, como en un ser humano, conciencia compleja. Procesamiento de información simple, conciencia simple.
13:31

Algo muy emocionante es que en los años recientes un neurocientífico, Giulio Tononi, tomó este tipo de teoría y la desarrolló rigurosamente con métodos matemáticos. Tiene una medida matemática de integración de la infor-mación, que llama phi, que mide el grado de información integrada en un sistema. Y supone que phi tiene que ver con la conciencia. Entonces en un cerebro humano, hay un increíble grado alto de integración de información, un grado alto de phi, mucha conciencia. En un ratón hay un grado medio de integración de información, igual bas-tante significativo, grado de conciencia bastante impor-tante. Pero cuando se llega a las lombrices, microbios, partículas, el grado de phi decae. El nivel de integración de información es menor, pero no es cero tampoco. En la teoría de Tononi, todavía habrá un nivel de conciencia diferente de cero. De hecho propone una ley funda-mental de la conciencia: alto grado de phi, alto grado de conciencia. No se si esta teoría es correcta, pero es probablemente la principal teoría en este momento en la ciencia de la conciencia. Se utiliza para integrar toda la gama de información científica. Tiene una buena propiedad que, de hecho, es lo suficiente-mente simple como para estamparla en una camiseta.
14:49

Además, otra razón es que el panpsiquismo puede ayudarnos a integrar la conciencia al mundo físico. Los físicos y los filósofos con frecuencia han observado que la física es curiosamente abstracta. Describe la estruc-tura de la realidad usando un montón de ecuaciones, pero no nos habla sobre la realidad que subyace debajo. Como explica Stephen Hawking, “¿De dónde sale el fuego de las ecuaciones?” Desde la visión panpsíquica las ecuaciones de la física se pueden dejar como están, pero se pueden usar para describir el flujo de la conciencia. Eso es lo que los físicos hacen básicamente, describen el flujo de la conciencia. Según esta visión, la conciencia es la que le pone fuego en las ecuaciones. En esa visión, la conciencia no se encuentra fuera del mundo físico como una especie de aditivo. Está ahí mismo en el centro.
15:44

Esta visión, creo, la visión panpsíquica, tiene el potencial para transfigurar nuestra relación con la naturaleza, y puede tener consecuencias sociales y éticas bastante serias. Algunas pueden ser ilógicas. Yo solía pensar que no debía comer nada que tuviera conciencia, entonces debía ser vegetariano. Si eres un panpsíquico y aceptas esa visión, tendrás mucha hambre. Creo que pensándolo bien, esto tiende a transformar tus visiones, mientras que lo que importa en términos éticos y consideraciones morales, no es tanto el hecho de la conciencia, sino su importancia y su complejidad.
16:26

También es natural preguntar por la conciencia en otros sistemas, como las computadoras. ¿Qué hay sobre el sistema de inteligencia artificial de Samantha en la película “Her”? ¿Es consciente? Según la visión de la información panpsíquica, ella tiene un procesamiento de información complicado, integrado, de modo que la respuesta es sí, si es consciente. Si esto es correcto, se plantean problemas éticos bastante serios sobre la ética del desarrollo de sistemas de computadoras inteligentes y la ética de apagarlos.
17:00

 

Finalmente, Uds. pueden preguntar por la conciencia de colectivos completos, el planeta. ¿Canadá tiene su propia conciencia? O a un nivel más local, ¿un grupo integrado, como la audiencia en una charla TED. ¿En este momento tenemos una conciencia colectiva TED, una película interna para este grupo completo de TED, distinta de las películas internas de cada una de las partes? No sé la respuesta a esa pregunta, pero creo que al menos es una pregunta que debe tomarse en serio.
17:32

 

Entonces esta vision panpsíquica, es una visión radical, y no sé si es correcta. En realidad estoy más seguro de la primer idea loca, que la conciencia es algo fundamental, que de la segunda, de que sea universal. La visión plantea muchas preguntas, muchos desafíos, como, cómo esos pedacitos de pensamiento contribuyen al tipo de conciencia compleja que conocemos y nos encanta. Si podemos responder a esas preguntas, entonces creo que vamos por el camino correcto hacia una teoría de la conciencia seria. Si no, bueno, probablemente éste es el problema más difícil de la ciencia y de la filosofía. No podemos esperar resolverlo de la noche a la mañana. Pero creo que finalmente lo iremos a descubrir. Entender la conciencia es la verdadera clave, creo, para entender el universo y para entendernos a nosotros mismos. Quizás sólo necesitemos la idea loca correcta.

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

Antonio Damasio: understanding consciousness

diumenge, 20/01/2019

 

Transcript Translated by Carme Cloquells
Reviewed by Llorenç Pons
I’m here to talk about the wonder and the mystery of conscious minds. The wonder is about the fact that we all woke up this morning and we had with it the amazing return of our conscious mind. We recovered minds with a complete sense of self and a complete sense of our own existence, yet we hardly ever pause to consider this wonder. We should, in fact, because without having this possibility of conscious minds, we would have no knowledge whatsoever about our humanity; we would have no knowledge whatsoever about the world. We would have no pains, but also no joys. We would have no access to love or to the ability to create. And of course, Scott Fitzgerald said famously that “he who invented consciousness would have a lot to be blamed for.” But he also forgot that without consciousness, he would have no access to true happiness and even the possibility of transcendence.So much for the wonder, now for the mystery. This is a mystery that has really been extremely hard to elucidate. All the way back into early philosophy and certainly throughout the history of neuroscience, this has been one mystery that has always resisted elucidation, has got major controversies. And there are actually many people that think we should not even touch it; we should just leave it alone, it’s not to be solved. I don’t believe that, and I think the situation is changing. It would be ridiculous to claim that we know how we make consciousness in our brains, but we certainly can begin to approach the question, and we can begin to see the shape of a solution.

02:01

And one more wonder to celebrate is the fact that we have imaging technologies that now allow us to go inside the human brain and be able to do, for example, what you’re seeing right now. These are images that come from Hanna Damasio’s lab, and which show you, in a living brain, the reconstruction of that brain. And this is a person who is alive. This is not a person that is being studied at autopsy. And even more — and this is something that one can be really amazed about — is what I’m going to show you next, which is going underneath the surface of the brain and actually looking in the living brain at real connections, real pathways. So all of those colored lines correspond to bunches of axons, the fibers that join cell bodies to synapses. And I’m sorry to disappoint you, they don’t come in color. But at any rate, they are there. The colors are codes for the direction, from whether it is back to front or vice versa.

03:09

At any rate, what is consciousness? What is a conscious mind? And we could take a very simple view and say, well, it is that which we lose when we fall into deep sleep without dreams, or when we go under anesthesia, and it is what we regain when we recover from sleep or from anesthesia. But what is exactly that stuff that we lose under anesthesia, or when we are in deep, dreamless sleep? Well first of all, it is a mind, which is a flow of mental images. And of course consider images that can be sensory patterns, visual, such as you’re having right now in relation to the stage and me, or auditory images, as you are having now in relation to my words. That flow of mental images is mind.

04:01

But there is something else that we are all experiencing in this room. We are not passive exhibitors of visual or auditory or tactile images. We have selves. We have a Me that is automatically present in our minds right now. We own our minds. And we have a sense that it’s everyone of us that is experi-encing this — not the person who is sitting next to you. So in order to have a conscious mind, you have a self within the conscious mind. So a conscious mind is a mind with a self in it. The self introduces the subjective perspective in the mind, and we are only fully conscious when self comes to mind. So what we need to know to even address this mystery is, number one, how are minds, are put together in the brain, and, number two, how selves are constructed.

04:57

Now the first part, the first problem, is relatively easy — it’s not easy at all — but it is something that has been approached gradually in neuroscience. And it’s quite clear that, in order to make minds, we need to construct neural maps. So imagine a grid, like the one I’m showing you right now, and now imagine, within that grid, that two-dimensional sheet, imagine neurons. And picture, if you will, a billboard, a digital billboard, where you have elements that can be either lit or not. And depending on how you create the pattern of lighting or not lighting, the digital elements, or, for that matter, the neurons in the sheet, you’re going to be able to construct a map. This, of course, is a visual map that I’m showing you, but this applies to any kind of map — auditory, for example, in relation to sound frequencies, or to the maps that we construct with our skin in relation to an object that we palpate.

05:56

Now to bring home the point of how close it is — the relationship between the grid of neurons and the topographical arrangement of the activity of the neurons and our mental experience — I’m going to tell you a personal story. So if I cover my left eye — I’m talking about me personally, not all of you — if I cover my left eye, I look at the grid — pretty much like the one I’m showing you. Everything is nice and fine and perpendicular. But sometime ago, I discovered that if I cover my left eye, instead what I get is this. I look at the grid and I see a warping at the edge of my central-left field.

06:37

Very odd — I’ve analyzed this for a while. But sometimes ago, through the help of an ophthalmologist colleague of mine, Carmen Puliafito, who developed a laser scanner of the retina, I found out the the following. If I scan my retina through the horizontal plane that you see there in the little corner, what I get is the following. On the right side, my retina is perfectly symmetrical. You see the going down towards the fovea where the optic nerve begins. But on my left retina there is a bump, which is marked there by the red arrow. And it corresponds to a little cyst that is located below. And that is exactly what causes the warping of my visual image.

07:21

So just think of this: you have a grid of neurons, and now you have a plane mechanical change in the position of the grid, and you get a warping of your mental experience. So this is how close your mental experience and the activity of the neurons in the retina, which is a part of the brain located in the eyeball, or, for that matter, a sheet of visual cortex. So from the retina you go onto visual cortex. And of course, the brain adds on a lot of information to what is going on in the signals that come from the retina. And in that image there, you see a variety of islands of what I call image-making regions in the brain. You have the green for example, that corresponds to tactile information, or the blue that corresponds to auditory information.

08:12

And something else that happens is that those image-making regions where you have the plotting of all these neural maps, can then provide signals to this ocean of purple that you see around, which is the association cortex, where you can make records of what went on in those islands of image-making. And the great beauty is that you can then go from memory, out of those association cortices, and produce back images in the very same regions that have perception. So think about how wonderfully convenient and lazy the brain is. So it provides certain areas for perception and image-making. And those are exactly the same that are going to be used for image-making when we recall information.

09:03

So far the mystery of the conscious mind is diminishing a little bit because we have a general sense of how we make these images. But what about the self? The self is really the elusive problem. And for a long time, people did not even want to touch it, because they’d say, “How can you have this reference point, this stability, that is required to maintain the continuity of selves day after day?” And I thought about a solution to this problem. It’s the following. We generate brain maps of the body’s interior and use them as the reference for all other maps.

09:43

So let me tell you just a little bit about how I came to this. I came to this because, if you’re going to have a reference that we know as self — the Me, the I in our own processing — we need to have something that is stable, something that does not deviate much from day to day. Well it so happens that we have a singular body. We have one body, not two, not three. And so that is a beginning. There is just one reference point, which is the body. But then, of course, the body has many parts, and things grow at different rates, and they have different sizes and different people; however, not so with the interior. The things that have to do with what is known as our internal milieu — for example, the whole management of the chemistries within our body are, in fact, extremely maintained day after day for one very good reason. If you deviate too much in the parameters that are close to the midline of that life-permitting survival range, you go into disease or death. So we have an in-built system within our own lives that ensures some kind of continuity. I like to call it an almost infinite sameness from day to day. Because if you don’t have that sameness, physiologically, you’re going to be sick or you’re going to die. So that’s one more element for this continuity.

11:08

And the final thing is that there is a very tight coupling between the regulation of our body within the brain and the body itself, unlike any other coupling. So for example, I’m making images of you, but there’s no physiological bond between the images I have of you as an audience and my brain. However, there is a close, permanently maintained bond between the body regulating parts of my brain and my own body.

11:40

So here’s how it looks. Look at the region there. There is the brain stem in between the cerebral cortex and the spinal cord. And it is within that region that I’m going to highlight now that we have this housing of all the life-regulation devices of the body. This is so specific that, for example, if you look at the part that is covered in red in the upper part of the brain stem, if you damage that as a result of a stroke, for example, what you get is coma or vegetative state, which is a state, of course, in which your mind disappears, your consciousness disappears. What happens then actually is that you lose the grounding of the self, you have no longer access to any feeling of your own existence, and, in fact, there can be images going on, being formed in the cerebral cortex, except you don’t know they’re there. You have, in effect, lost consciousness when you have damage to that red section of the brain stem.

12:44

But if you consider the green part of the brain stem, nothing like that happens. It is that specific. So in that green component of the brain stem, if you damage it, and often it happens, what you get is complete paralysis, but your conscious mind is maintained. You feel, you know, you have a fully conscious mind that you can report very indirectly. This is a horrific condition. You don’t want to see it. And people are, in fact, imprisoned within their own bodies, but they do have a mind. There was a very interesting film, one of the rare good films done about a situation like this, by Julian Schnabel some years ago about a patient that was in that condition.

13:28

So now I’m going to show you a picture. I promise not to say anything about this, except this is to frighten you. It’s just to tell you that in that red section of the brain stem, there are, to make it simple, all those little squares that correspond to modules that actually make brain maps of different aspects of our interior, different aspects of our body. They are exquisitely topographic and they are exquisitely interconnected in a recursive pattern. And it is out of this and out of this tight coupling between the brain stem and the body that I believe — and I could be wrong, but I don’t think I am — that you generate this mapping of the body that provides the grounding for the self and that comes in the form of feelings — primordial feelings, by the way.

 

So what is the picture that we get here? Look at “cerebral cortex,” look at “brain stem,” look at “body,” and you get the picture of the interconnectivity in which you have the brain stem providing the grounding for the self in a very tight interconnection with the body. And you have the cerebral cortex providing the great spectacle of our minds with the profusion of images that are, in fact, the contents of our minds and that we normally pay most attention to, as we should, because that’s really the film that is rolling in our minds. But look at the arrows. They’re not there for looks. They’re there because there’s this very close interaction. You cannot have a conscious mind if you don’t have the interaction between cerebral cortex and brain stem. You cannot have a conscious mind if you don’t have the interaction between the brain stem and the body.

 

Another thing that is interesting is that the brain stem that we have is shared with a variety of other species. So throughout vertebrates, the design of the brain stem is very similar to ours, which is one of the reasons why I think those other species have conscious minds like we do. Except that they’re not as rich as ours, because they don’t have a cerebral cortex like we do. That’s where the difference is. And I strongly disagree with the idea that consciousness should be considered as the great product of the cerebral cortex. Only the wealth of our minds is, not the very fact that we have a self that we can refer to our own existence, and that we have any sense of person.

Now there are three levels of self to consider — the proto, the core and the autobiographical. The first two are shared with many, many other species, and they are really coming out largely of the brain stem and whatever there is of cortex in those species. It’s the autobiographical self which some species have, I think. Cetaceans and primates have also an autobiographical self to a certain degree. And everybody’s dogs at home have an autobiographical self to a certain degree. But the novelty is here.

 

The autobiographical self is built on the basis of past memories and memories of the plans that we have made; it’s the lived past and the anticipated future. And the autobiographical self has prompted extended memory, reasoning, imagination, creativity and language. And out of that came the instruments of culture — religions, justice, trade, the arts, science, technology. And it is within that culture that we really can get — and this is the novelty — something that is not entirely set by our biology. It is developed in the cultures. It developed in collectives of human beings. And this is, of course, the culture where we have developed something that I like to call socio-cultural regulation.

And finally, you could rightly ask, why care about this? Why care if it is the brain stem or the cerebral cortex and how this is made? Three reasons. First, curiosity. Primates are extremely curious — and humans most of all. And if we are interested, for example, in the fact that anti-gravity is pulling galaxies away from the Earth, why should we not be interested in what is going on inside of human beings?

Second, understanding society and culture. We should look at how society and culture in this socio-cultural regulation are a work in progress. And finally, medicine. Let’s not forget that some of the worst diseases of humankind are diseases such as depression, Alzheimer’s disease, drug addiction. Think of strokes that can devastate your mind or render you unconscious. You have no prayer of treating those diseases effectively and in a non-serendipitous way if you do not know how this works. So that’s a very good reason beyond curiosity to justify what we’re doing, and to justify having some interest in what is going on in our brains.

Thank you for your attention.

(Applause)

Sóc aquí per a parlar de la meravella i el misteri de la ment conscient. La meravella és sobre el fet que en despertar aquest matí recuperem sorprenentment la nostra ment conscient. Recuperem la ment sota una completa sensació de ser i una sensació d’existència pròpia, però gairebé mai ens aturem a considerar aquesta meravella. Hauríem fer-ho, en realitat, perquè sense la possibilitat d’una ment conscient, no tindríem cap coneixement sobre la nostra humanitat; no tindríem cap coneixement sobre el món. No tindríem dolors, però tampoc alegries. No accediríem a l’amor o a la capacitat de crear. I per descomptat, com va dir Scott Fitzgerald: “Qui va descobrir la consciència va cometre un pecat mortal. ” Però ell també va oblidar que sense consciència no hauria accés a la veritable felicitat, i fins i tot, a la possibilitat de transcendir.Fins aquí per la meravella, ara el misteri. Aquest és un misteri que ha estat extremadament difícil d’elucidar. Des dels començaments de la filosofia i sens dubte, al llarg de la història de la neuro-ciència, aquest ha estat un misteri que sempre s’ha resistit a l’elucidació, i ha plantejat grans controvèrsies. I fins i tot hi ha molts que pensen que no hauríem tractar-lo; hauríem deixar-ho com està, que no serà resolt. Jo no ho crec, i crec que les circumstàncies estan canviant. Seria ridícul afirmar que sabem com es crea la consciència en els nostres cervells, però per descomptat, podem començar plantejant la qüestió i començar a veure el desenvolupament d’una solució.

I una altra meravella per celebrar és que tenim tecnologies d’imatge que ens permeten entrar al cervell humà, i accedir, per exemple, al que veuen en aquest moment. Aquestes són imatges del laboratori Hanna Damasio, on es mostra la reconstrucció d’un cervell viu. I aquesta és una persona viva. Aquest no és l’estudi d’una autòpsia. I fins i tot el que els mostraré a continuació, és una cosa que pot sorprendre’ls realment, i que va per sota de la superfície cerebral, i fins i tot observant en el cervell viu, les connexions, les vies reals. De manera que aquestes línies acolorides corresponen a grups d’axons, les fibres que uneixen els cossos cel·lulars en les sinapsis. I disculpin per decebre’ls, aquestes no són de colors. Sigui com sigui, elles són allà. Els colors serveixen per indicar la direcció, si va de darrere a endavant o viceversa.

De tota manera, què és la consciència? Què és una ment conscient? I a primera vista, po-dríem dir que és allò que perdem en caure en un somni profund sense somnis, o sota anes-tèsia; I és allò que recobrem al despertar o després dels efectes de l’anestèsia. Però què és allò que perdem precisament sota anes-tèsia, o en estat de son profund sense somnis? Bé, en primer lloc, és una ment, el que significa que és un flux d’imatges mentals. I per descomp-tat considerar les imatges com a patrons sensorials. En aquest cas, les imatges són visuals, en relació a l’escenari i a mi, o imatges auditives, en relació a les meves paraules. Aquest flux d’imatges mentals és la ment.

Però hi ha alguna cosa més que experimentem en aquest recinte. No som exhibidors passius d’imatges visuals, auditives o tàctils. Tots tenim un si mateix. Tenim un jo que és present involuntàriament en les nostres ments en aquest moment. posseïm les nostres ments I tenim la sensació que cada un de nosaltres ho està experimentant, i no la persona asseguda al seu costat. Així que per tenir una ment conscient, tindran un si mateix dins de la ment conscient. Per tant, una ment conscient és una ment amb un si mateix en ella. El sí mateix introdueix la perspectiva subjectiva en la ment, i només som completament conscients quan el si mateix ve a la ment. Llavors el que necessitem saber per abordar aquest misteri és, en primer lloc, com la ment s’uneix al cervell i segon, com es construeix el sí mateix.

Doncs bé, el primer problema és relativament senzill, però és una cosa que s’ha abordat progressivament en neurociència. I està ben clar que per constituir la ment, és necessari construir mapes neuronals. Així, imaginin una quadrícula com la que mostro, i imaginin en aquesta quadrícula un full de dues dimensions; imaginin neurones. Una presentació, si es vol, una cartellera digital, amb elements que poden il·luminar o no. I d’acord a com es creï el patró d’il·luminació o no, els elements digitals, o en aquest cas, les neurones en el full, podran construir un mapa. Això que els mostro és, per descomptat, un mapa visual però s’aplica a tot tipus de mapa, per exemple, auditiu, en relació a les freqüències de so, o els mapes construïts amb la pell, quan es palpa un objecte.

 

 

Per entendre el prop que està la relació entre la quadrícula de neurones i la disposició topogràfica de l’activitat neuronal i la nostra experiència mental, els explicaré una experiència personal. Si cobreixo el meu ull esquerre- parlo de mi i no de cap de vostès -, si cobreixo el meu ull esquerre, i miro la quadrícula, molt similar a la que els estic mostrant; tot està bé, correcte, i perpendicular. Però fa algun temps vaig descobrir que si cobreixo el meu ull esquerre, el que veig és això. Veig una deformació a la vora de l’àrea central esquerra.

 

 

Molt estrany; l’he analitzat durant un temps. Però fa algun temps, mitjançant l’ajuda d’una col·lega oftalmòloga, Carmen Puliafito, qui va desenvolupar un escàner làser de la retina, vaig trobar el següent. Si escaneig meva retina mitjançant un pla horitzontal com el que es veu allà al racó, el que s’obté és el següent. A la part dreta, la meva retina és perfectament simètrica. Observin la baixada cap a la fòvea, que és on comença el nervi òptic. Però a la meva retina esquerra hi ha un sot, assenyalat per la fletxa vermella. Correspon a un petit quist situat per sota. I és això exactament el que causa la deformació de la meva visió.

 

 

 

Pensin en això: tenen una quadrícula de neurones, i es produeix un canvi mecànic pla en la posició de la quadrícula, i s’obté una deformació de la seva experiència mental. Mostra la proximitat que hi ha entre la seva experiència mental i l’activitat de les neurones a la retina, que és la part del cervell localitzat en el globus ocular, o en aquest cas, una capa de l’escorça visual. Llavors, va des de la retina cap a l’escorça visual. I per descomptat, el cervell afegeix molta informació respecte a els senyals que provenen de la retina. I en aquella imatge, veuen una varietat d’illes, les que anomeno regió de creació d’imatges en el cervell. L’àrea verda, per exemple, correspon a la informació tàctil, i la blava a la informació auditiva.

 

I una altra cosa que passa és que, aquella regió de creació d’imatges, on hi ha el traçat d’aquests mapes neuronals, pot proveir de senyals a aquest oceà porpra que s’observa al voltant, que és l’escorça d’associació, i és on es pot arxivar el que va succeir a les illes de creació d’imatges. I la veritable bellesa és que es pot passar de la memòria, a aquelles escorces d’associació, i reproduir imatges en les mateixes regions que tenen percepció. Pensin en quan meravellosament pràctic i mandrós és el cervell. Així, preveu àrees de percepció i de creació d’imatges. I aquelles seran exactament les que s’utilitzaran per a la creació d’imatges quan recordem informació.

 

 

Llavors, d’aquesta manera, el misteri de la ment conscient es redueix una mica, perquè tenim un coneixement general de com creem aquestes imatges Però que passà amb el Jo? El Jo és realment difícil d’aprehendre. I durant molt de temps, la gent ni volia abordar-lo, perquè plantejaven: “Com es pot tenir aquest punt de referència, que es requereix per mantenir una continuïtat dels Jo dia rere dia. ” I vaig trobar una solució a aquest problema. I és la següent. Creem mapes cerebrals de l’interior del cos i els utilitzem com a referència per als altres mapes

 

 

I permetin-me explicar com vaig arribar a això. I ho vaig aconseguir perquè, si tenim una referència que coneixem com sí mateix, el mi, el jo en el nostre processament, necessitem que sigui estable, que no presenti moltes desviacions dia a dia. Doncs passa que tenim un únic cos. Un cos sol, no dos ni tres. I aquest és el començament. El cos és justament un punt de referència. Però el cos, per descomptat, té molts membres, que creixen a ritmes diferents, tenen diferents mides i persones diferents; però, no succeeix el mateix amb l’interior. Amb aquells elements relacionats al que es coneix com el nostre medi intern. Per exemple, la gestió integral dels compostos químics interns del cos, són de fet mantinguts intensament, dia rere dia, per una molt bona raó. Si es desvien massa en els paràmetres propers a la mitjana, sobre la base del rang de supervivència que permet la vida, es produirà la malaltia o la mort. Així que tenim un sistema incorporat en les nostres vides que assegura cert tipus de continuïtat. Una cosa així com una gairebé infinita uniformitat dia rere dia. Perquè si no existeix aquesta uniformitat fisiològica, ens emmalaltim o morim. I hi ha un element més per a aquesta continuïtat.

 

 

I és que existeix un acoblament estret entre la regulació del nostre cos en el cervell i el cos en si; a diferència de qualsevol altre acoblament. Per exemple, estic creant imatges de vostès, però no hi ha cap vincle fisiològic entre les imatges de vostès com a audiència i el meu cervell. No obstant això, hi ha un vincle estret i sostingut permanentment entre el cos regulant parts del meu cervell i el meu propi cos.

 

 

Així és com es veu. Observin l’àrea. El tronc encefàlic es troba entre l’escorça cerebral i la medul·la espinal. I aquesta regió que ara els marcaré, és l’allotjament de tots els dispositius reguladors de la vida del cos. És tan específic que si, per exemple, observen l’àrea en vermell, a la part superior del tronc cerebral, es produeix un dany, com un accident cerebrovascular, el resultat és un coma o estat vegetatiu, un estat en el qual, per descomptat, la seva ment desapareix; desapareix la seva consciència. El que passa en realitat, és que es perd la base del Jo, ja no tindran accés a cap sensació de la seva existència, i de fet poden succeir imatges formades en l’escorça cerebral, però no sabran que hi són. En efecte, han perdut la consciència si s’ha danyat la secció vermella del tronc encefàlic.

 

Però si considerem la regió verda del tronc encefàlic, no passa el mateix. Això és molt específic. Així, en el segment verd del tronc encefàlic, quan es fa malbé, i passa sovint, el que es produeix és una paràlisi completa, però es manté la ment conscient. Vostès senten, que hi ha una ment completament conscient, de la qual poden donar compte molt indirectament. Aquesta és una afecció espantosa, no voldrien veure-la. I les persones estan realment empresonades dins dels seus cossos, però tenen la seva ment. Hi va haver una pel·lícula molt interessant, una de les poques ben fetes sobre un cas similar a aquest, de Julian Schnabel, sobre un pacient amb aquesta afecció.

 

Els mostraré una foto. Prometo no dir res llevat que els espanti. Només especificar que en la secció vermella del tronc encefàlic, hi ha, i per simplificar, petits quadrats que corresponen als mòduls que en realitat formen els mapes cerebrals dels diferents aspectes del nostre interior, de les diferents parts del nostre cos, Són exquisidament topogràfics i estan exquisidament interconnectats en un patró recurrent. I és gràcies a això i a aquest estret acoblament, entre el tronc encefàlic i el cos, que, podria equivocar-me, encara que no ho crec, es genera aquest mapatge corporal que proveeix de base al Jo sota la forma de sensacions, els sentiments primordials, per cert.

 

 

Aleshores, què és aquesta foto que veiem allà? Observin “l’escorça cerebral” i “el tronc encefàlic”, observin “el cos”, i obtindran la interconnexió, mitjançant la qual el tronc encefàlic proveeix de base al si mateix, en una estreta interconnexió amb el cos. I tenim l’escorça cerebral proporcionant el gran espectacle de les nostres ments amb l’exuberància d’imatges, que són en realitat, el contingut de les nostres ments, i al que normalment li prestem més atenció, i hauríem, perquè veritablement és la pel·lícula que es veu en les nostres ments. Però observin les fletxes. No estan allà per casualitat. Són allà perquè hi ha una interacció molt estreta. Vostès no tenen una ment conscient si no tenen aquesta interacció entre l’escorça cerebral i el tronc encefàlic. No tenen una ment conscient si no tenen la interacció entre el tronc encefàlic i el cos.

 

Una altra cosa interessant és que el tronc encefàlic també ho compartim amb altres espècies. És així que en els vertebrats, el disseny del cervell és molt similar al nostre, i aquest és un dels motius pel qual altres espècies tenen una ment conscient com la nostra. No tan rica com la nostra, perquè no tenen la nostra escorça cerebral. Allà rau la diferència. I estic en total desacord amb la idea que la consciència sigui considerada com el gran producte de l’escorça cerebral. És la riquesa de la nostra ment, i no el fet que tinguem un sí mateix al qual puguem referir sobre la nostra pròpia existència, i aquesta sensació de ser persona.

 

Ara, hi ha tres nivells de si mateix: el proto-jo, el jo-central i el jo-autobiogràfic. Els dos primers són compartits amb moltes espècies i són produïts en gran mesura pel tronc encefàlic i tot el que derivi de l’escorça en aquestes espècies. És el jo-auto-biogràfic el que posseeixen algunes espècies, crec. Cetacis i primats posseeixen un jo-autobiogràfic fins a cert punt. I els gossos domèstics tenen en certa manera també, un jo-autobiogràfic. Però la novetat és aquí.

 

El jo-autobiogràfic es construeix sobre la base dels records del passat i dels records dels plans que hem fet; és la vida passada i el futur projectat. I el jo-autobiogràfic ha provocat la memòria ampliada, el raonament, la imaginació, la creativitat i el llenguatge. I d’ells han sortit els instruments de la cultura: la religió, la justícia, el comerç, les arts, la ciència, la tecnologia. I és dins d’aquesta cultura que podem aconseguir, i aquest és el descobriment, cosa que no està establert biològicament del tot. Està desenvolupat en les cultures. El desenvolupen els éssers humans en col · lectiu. I aquesta és, per descomptat, la cultura en què hem desenvolupat una cosa que anomeno la regulació sociocultural.

 

I finalment, podrien encertadament preguntar, Què importa això? Què importa si la primera preocupació és el tronc cerebral o l’escorça cerebral i com estan formats? Tres raons. La primera, la curiositat. Els primats són extremadament curiosos i els humans més que cap. I si ens interessa, per exemple, el fet que la antigravetat allunya galàxies de la Terra, Per què no estarem interessats en el que succeeix a l’interior dels éssers humans?

 

Segon, comprendre la societat i la cultura. Però hem de considerar com la societat i la cultura, en aquesta regulació sociocultural, és una tasca que continua. I finalment, la medicina. No oblidem que algunes de les pitjors malalties de la humanitat són la depressió, Alzheimer, i l’addicció a les drogues. Pensin en un accident cerebro-vascular que pot desbastar la ment o deixar-los inconscients. No hi ha oració que tracti aquestes malalties de manera efectiva i tampoc de manera atzarosa si no se sap com funciona. Així que és una molt bona raó, més enllà de la curiositat, per justificar el que fem i justificar el interès per saber el que passa en els nostres cervells.

Gràcies per la seva atenció.

(Aplaudiments)

Neurons & Civiliations

dissabte, 19/01/2019

 

 Transcript  Translated by Thierry Barnier
Reviewed by Stephanie Curiel
I’d like to talk to you today about the human brain, which is what we do research on at the University of California. Just think about this problem for a second. Here is a lump of flesh, about three pounds, which you can hold in the palm of your hand. But it can contemplate the vastness of interstellar space. It can contemplate the meaning of infinity; ask questions about the meaning of its own existence, about the nature of God. 

00:35

And this is truly the most amazing thing in the world. It’s the greatest mystery confronting human beings: How does this all come about? Well, the brain, as you know, is made up of neurons. We’re looking at neurons here. There are 100 billion neurons in the adult human brain. And each neuron makes something like 1,000 to 10,000 contacts with other neurons in the brain. And based on this, people have calculated that the number of permutations and combinations of brain activity exceeds the number of elementary particles in the universe.

 

01:02

So, how do you go about studying the brain? One approach is to look at patients who had lesions in different part of the brain, and study changes in their behavior. This is what I spoke about in the last TED. Today I’ll talk about a different approach, which is to put electrodes in different parts of the brain, and actually record the activity of individual nerve cells in the brain. Sort of eavesdrop on the activity of nerve cells in the brain.

 

01:23

Now, one recent discovery that has been made by researchers in Italy, in Parma, by Giacomo Rizzolatti and his colleagues, is a group of neurons called mirror neurons, which are on the front of the brain in the frontal lobes. Now, it turns out there are neurons which are called ordinary motor command neurons in the front of the brain, which have been known for over 50 years. These neurons will fire when a person performs a specific action. For example, if I do that, and reach and grab an apple, a motor command neuron in the front of my brain will fire. If I reach out and pull an object, another neuron will fire, commanding me to pull that object. These are called motor command neurons that have been known for a long time.

02:00

But what Rizzolatti found was a subset of these neurons, maybe about 20 percent of them, will also fire when I’m looking at somebody else performing the same action. So, here is a neuron that fires when I reach and grab something, but it also fires when I watch Joe reaching and grabbing something. And this is truly astonishing. Because it’s as though this neuron is adopting the other person’s point of view. It’s almost as though it’s performing a virtual reality simulation of the other person’s action.

 

02:27

Now, what is the significance of these mirror neurons? For one thing they must be involved in things like imitation and emulation. Because to imitate a complex act requires my brain to adopt the other person’s point of view. So, this is important for imitation and emulation. Well, why is that important? Well, let’s take a look at the next slide. So, how do you do imitation? Why is imitation important? Mirror neurons and imitation, emulation.

 

02:51

Now, let’s look at culture, the phenomenon of human culture. If you go back in time about [75,000] to 100,000 years ago, let’s look at human evolution, it turns out that something very important happened around 75,000 years ago. And that is, there is a sudden emergence and rapid spread of a number of skills that are unique to human beings like tool use, the use of fire, the use of shelters, and, of course, language, and the ability to read somebody else’s mind and interpret that person’s behavior. All of that happened relatively quickly.

 

03:20

Even though the human brain had achieved its present size almost three or four hundred thousand years ago, 100,000 years ago all of this happened very, very quickly. And I claim that what happened was the sudden emergence of a sophisticated mirror neuron system, which allowed you to emulate and imitate other people’s actions. So that when there was a sudden accidental discovery by one member of the group, say the use of fire, or a particular type of tool, instead of dying out, this spread rapidly, horizontally across the population, or was transmitted vertically, down the generations.

 

03:50

So, this made evolution suddenly Lamarckian, instead of Darwinian. Darwinian evolution is slow; it takes hundreds of thousands of years. A polar bear, to evolve a coat, will take thousands of generations, maybe 100,000 years. A human being, a child, can just watch its parent kill another polar bear, and skin it and put the skin on its body, fur on the body, and learn it in one step. What the polar bear took 100,000 years to learn, it can learn in five minutes, maybe 10 minutes. And then once it’s learned this it spreads in geometric proportion across a population.

 

04:23

This is the basis. The imitation of complex skills is what we call culture and is the basis of civilization. Now there is another kind of mirror neuron, which is involved in something quite different. And that is, there are mirror neurons, just as there are mirror neurons for action, there are mirror neurons for touch. In other words, if somebody touches me, my hand, neuron in the somato-sensory cortex in the sensory region of the brain fires. But the same neuron, in some cases, will fire when I simply watch another person being touched. So, it’s empathizing the other person being touched.

 

04:52

So, most of them will fire when I’m touched in different locations. Different neurons for different locations. But a subset of them will fire even when I watch somebody else being touched in the same location. So, here again you have neurons which are enrolled in empathy. Now, the question then arises: If I simply watch another person being touched, why do I not get confused and literally feel that touch sensation merely by watching somebody being touched? I mean, I empathize with that person but I don’t literally feel the touch. Well, that’s because you’ve got receptors in your skin, touch and pain receptors, going back into your brain and saying “Don’t worry, you’re not being touched. So, empathize, by all means, with the other person, but do not actually experience the touch, otherwise you’ll get confused and muddled.”

 

05:32

Okay, so there is a feedback signal that vetoes the signal of the mirror neuron preventing you from consciously experiencing that touch. But if you remove the arm, you simply anesthetize my arm, so you put an injection into my arm, anesthetize the brachial plexus, so the arm is numb, and there is no sensations coming in, if I now watch you being touched, I literally feel it in my hand. In other words, you have dissolved the barrier between you and other human beings. So, I call them Gandhi neurons, or empathy neurons. (Laughter)

 

06:00

And this is not in some abstract metaphorical sense. All that’s separating you from him, from the other person, is your skin. Remove the skin; you experience that person’s touch in your mind. You’ve dissolved the barrier between you and other human beings. And this, of course, is the basis of much of Eastern philosophy, and that is there is no real independent self, aloof from other human beings, inspecting the world, inspecting other people. You are, in fact, connected not just via Facebook and Internet; you’re actually quite literally connected by your neurons. And there is whole chains of neurons around this room, talking to each other. And there is no real distinctiveness of your consciousness from somebody else’s consciousness.

06:36

And this is not mumbo-jumbo philosophy. It emerges from our understanding of basic neuroscience. So, you have a patient with a phantom limb. If the arm has been removed and you have a phantom, and you watch somebody else being touched, you feel it in your phantom. Now the astonishing thing is, if you have pain in your phantom limb, you squeeze the other person’s hand, massage the other person’s hand, that relieves the pain in your phantom hand, almost as though the neuron were obtaining relief from merely watching somebody else being massaged.

 

07:03

So, here you have my last slide. For the longest time people have regarded science and humanities as being distinct. C.P. Snow spoke of the two cultures: science on the one hand, humanities on the other; never the twain shall meet. So, I’m saying the mirror neuron system underlies the interface allowing you to rethink about issues like consciousness, representa-tion of self, what separates you from other human beings, what allows you to empathize with other human beings, and also even things like the emergence of culture and civilization, which is unique to human beings.

Thank you.

(Applause)

Aujourd’hui, je voudrais vous parler du cerveau humain, qui est ce sur quoi nous faisons des recherches à l’Uni-versité de Californie. Réfléchissez au problème l’espace d’un instant. Voici un morceau de chair, d’environ 1,5kg, que vous pouvez tenir dans la paume de votre main. Mais qui peut appréhender l’immensité de l’espace interstellaire. Il peut apprécier la notion d’infini, poser des questions sur la signification de sa propre existence, et la nature de Dieu.

 

00:35

Et c’est véritablement la chose la plus étonnante au monde. Le plus grand mystère pour l’Homme : Comment cela est-il arrivé? Comme vous le savez, le cerveau est composé de neurones. Ici, nous voyons des neurones. Il y a 100 milliards de neurones dans un cerveau adulte. Et chaque neurone établit entre 1.000 et 10.000 connexions avec d’autres neurones dans le cerveau. Et sur cette base, on a calculé que le nombre de permutations et de combinaisons d’activité cérébrale excède le nombre de particules élémentaires dans l’univers.

 

01:02

Donc, par où commencer l’étude du cerveau? Une approche est d’observer les personnes atteintes de lésions dans différentes parties du cerveau, et d’étudier les changements dans leur comportement. C’est de ceci dont j’ai parlé lors du TED précédent. Aujourd’hui, je vais vous parler d’une approche différente qui est de placer des électrodes dans différentes parties du cerveau, et d’enregistrer l’activité de cellules nerveuses individuelles dans le cerveau. Comme si l’on plaçait une cellule nerveuse sur table d’écoute.

 

01:23

Une découverte récente has été faite par une équipe de chercheurs italiens de Parme, dirigée par Giaco-mo Rizzolatti et ses collègues, ce sont un groupe de neurones appelés “neurones miroirs”, qui sont situés à l’avant du cerveau dans les lobes fronteaux. Il s’avère qu’il y a des neurones appelés “neurones de commande moteurs ordinaires” à l’avant du cerveau, qui ont été identifiés depuis plus de 50 ans. Ces neurones vont s’activer lorsqu’une personne accomplit une action spécifique. Par exemple, si je fais ceci et saisit d’une pomme, un neurone moteur à l’avant de mon cerveau va s’activer. Si j’étends le bras, et amène un objet vers moi, un autre neurone va s’activer, m’ordonnant d’amener cet objet. Ce sont les neurones de commande moteurs qui sont connus depuis longtemps.

 

02:00

Mais ce que Rizzolatti a découvert était qu’une partie de ces neurones, peut-être environ 20%, vont aussi s’activer quand j’observe quelqu’un d’autre effectuer cette même action. Voici un neurone qui s’active quand je saisis quelque chose, mais qui s’active également quand je regarde Joe saisir quelque chose. Cela est réellement renversant. Car c’est comme si ce neurone adoptait le point de vue d’une autre personne. C’est presque comme s’il réalisait une simulation de la réalité virtuelle de l’action d’une autre personne.

 

02:27

Maintenant, quelle est la signification de ces neurones miroirs? Pour commencer, elles doivent être impliquées dans les processus d’émulation et d’imitation Car imiter une action complexe demande au cerveau d’adopter le point de vue de l’autre personne. Donc, cela est important pour l’imitation et l’émulation. Pourquoi cela est-il important? Passons à l’étude de la diapositive suivante Donc, comment imitez-vous? Pourquoi la faculté d’imitation est-elle importante? Les neurones miroir et l’imitation, l’émulation.

 

02:51

Maintenant, observons la culture, le phénomène de la culture humaine. Si vous remontez entre 75.000 et 100.000 ans en arrière, observez l’évolution des humains, il apparait que quelque chose de très important apparût il y a environ 75.000 ans. Qu’il y eu l’émergence soudaine, et le développement rapi-de d’un nombre de compétences unique aux hu-mains comme l’utilisation d’outils, la maitrise du feu, d’abris et bien sûr, du langage, et la capacité de comprendre ce qu’il y a dans la tête de l’autre et d’interpréter les comportements de cette personne. Tout cela est arrivé dans un temps relativement court.

 

03:20

Bien que la taille du cerveau humain ait atteint sa taille actuelle depuis presque 300.000 ou 400.000 ans, il y a 100.000 ans, tout ceci est arrivé très très vite. Et je pense que ce qui arriva fut l’émergence soudaine d’un système de neurones miroirs sophis-tiqué, qui nous a permis d’émuler et d’imiter les actions d’autres personnes. Et qu’ainsi lors d’une découverte soudaine accidentelle par un membre du groupe, comme l’usage du feu, ou d’un type parti-culier d’outil, au lieu de disparaître cette découverte s’est répandue rapidement horizontalement dans la population, ou s’est transmise verticalement entre les générations.

 

03:50

Cela a soudain rendu l’évolution Lamarckienne, au lieu de Darwinienne. L’évolution Darwinienne est lente ; elle prend des centaines de milliers d’années. Un ours polaire, pour se doter de sa fourrure, a mis des milliers de générations, peut-être 100.000 ans. Un être humain, un enfant, peut seulement regarder ses parents tuer un ours polaire le dépecer, se faire un manteau avec la fourrure, et apprendre en un coup. Ce que l’ours polaire a mis 100.000 ans à apprendre, il peut l’apprendre en 5 minutes, peut être 10 minutes. Une fois cette compétence acquise, elle se diffuse en proportion géométrique dans la population.

 

04:23

C’est le mécanisme de base. L’imitation de compétences complexes est ce que nous appelons culture et est à l’origine de toute civilisation. Il existe un autre type de neurones miroirs, qui est impliqué dans un processus assez différent. Ce sont des neurones miroirs, comme il existe des neurones pour les actes, il y a des neurones pour les contacts physiques. En d’autres termes, si quelqu’un me touche, touche ma main, les neurones du cortex somato-sensoriel dans la région sensorielle du cerveau, s’activent. Mais le même neurone, va dans certains cas également s’activer quand je regarde une autre personne être touchée. Donc, je ressens de l’empathie pour la personne touchée.

 

04:52

La plupart vont s’activer quand on me touche à différents endroits. Différents neurones pour différents endroits. Mais une partie va s’activer quand je regarde quelqu’un d’autre se faire toucher au même endroit. Donc, ici aussi, nous avons des neurones qui participent au processus d’empathie. Maintenant, une question apparait : si je regarde une personne se faire toucher, pourquoi je ne m’y perds pas en ressentant moi-même le contact simplement en regardent quelqu’un se faire toucher? Je veux dire, j’ai de l’empathie pour cette personne, mais je ne ressens pas littéralement le contact. C’est parce que vous avez des récepteurs dans la peau, des récepteurs du toucher et de la douleur, connectés à votre cerveau, qui disent “Pas d’inquiétude, tu n’es pas en train d’être touché. Ressens toute l’empathie que tu souhaites pour l’autre personne, mais ne ressens pas physiquement le contact autrement tu seras perdu et embrouillé.”

 

05:32

Donc, il y a un signal en retour qui bloque le signal du neurone miroir vous empêchant de ressentir consciemment ce contact. Mais si vous déconnectez votre bras, vous anesthésiez simplement mon bras, avec une injection dans mon bras, qui anesthésie le plexus brachial, pour insensibiliser mon bras, et il n’y a aucune sensation qui rentre, si maintenant je vous regarde en train de vous faire toucher, je vais littéralement le sentir dans ma main. En d’autres mots, vous avez aboli la barrière entre vous et les autres êtres humains. Pour cette raison, je les appelle les neurones Gandhi, ou neurones d’empathie. (Rires)

 

06:00

Et ce n’est un sens métaphorique abstrait, tout ce qui vous sépare de l’autre, est votre peau. Enlevez votre peau, et vous ressentirez le toucher de cette personne dans votre esprit. Vous avez aboli la barrière entre vous et les autres êtres humains. Et cela est la base de la plupart des philosophies orientales. Il n’y a pas de personnalités entièrement autonomes, déconnectée des autres être humais, inspectant le monde, inspectant les autres personnes. Vous êtes en fait, connectés, pas uniquement via Facebook et internet, vous êtes en réalité littéralement connectés par vos neurones. Et il y a une chaine entière de neurones dans cette pièce, qui parlent entre eux. Et il n’y a pas de réelle distinction entre votre conscience et celle d’autrui.

 

06:36

Et ceci n’est pas du charabia philosophique. C’est le résultat de notre compréhension de la neuroscience de base. Donc, si vous avez un patient avec un membre fantôme. Si son bras a été enlevé et que vous avez un fantôme, et que vous regardez quelqu’un d’autre se faire toucher, vous le ressentirez dans votre fantôme. Maintenant la chose surprenante est, si vous avez une douleur dans votre membre fantôme, vous serrez la main de quelqu’un d’autre, vous massez la main de cette autre personne, cela atténuera la douleur dans votre main fantôme, comme si les neurones étaient soulagés seulement en regardant quelqu’un d’autre se faire masser.

 

07:03

Voici la dernière page de ma présentation. Depuis toujours, les hommes ont considéré la science et les humanités comme distinctes. C.P. Snow parle de deux cultures : la science d’un côté, les humanités de l’autre ; bien campées sur leurs positions. Je pense que le système de neurones moteurs est une base à l’interface vous permettant de reconsidérer des concepts comme l’état de conscience, la perception de soi, ce qui vous sépare des autres êtres humains, ce qui vous permet de ressentir de l’empathie, et aussi d’autre chose comme l’apparition de la culture et de la civilisation qui est unique aux être humains.

Merci.

(Applaudissements)

Ondas gravitacionales, 2015

dijous, 27/12/2018

 

Hace un poco más de cien años, en 1915, Einstein publicó su teoría de la relatividad general, que es un nombre medio raro, pero esta es una teoría que explica la gravedad. Dice que las masas — toda la materia, los planetas — se atraen no porque los atraiga una fuerza instantánea, como decía Newton, sino porque toda la materia — todos nosotros, todos los planetas — arrugan la tela flexible del espacio-tiempo.

00:45

El espacio-tiempo es esto en lo que vivimos y que nos conecta a todos. Es como cuando nosotros nos acostamos en un colchón y deformamos el colchón. Y las masas se mueven no — de nuevo, no por las leyes de Newton, sino porque ven esa curvatura del espacio-tiempo y van siguiendo las curvitas, así como cuando nuestro compañero de cama se nos arrima debido a la curvatura del colchón.

(Risas)

Un año después, en 1916, Einstein derivó de su teoría que existían las ondas gravitacionales. Esas eran producidas cuando las masas se mueven como, por ejemplo, cuando dos estrellas están girando una alrededor de la otra, y producen pliegues en el espacio-tiempo que se llevan energía del sistema y se van acercando las estrellas. Sin embargo, él también calculó que estos efectos eran tan tan tan pequeños que nunca se iban a poder medir. Les voy a contar como, con el trabajo de cientos de científicos trabajando desde muchos países por muchas décadas, hace muy poquito tiempo en el 2015, descubrimos esas ondas gravitacionales por primera vez.

02:15

Esta es una historia bastante larga. Empezó hace 1.300 millones de años. Hace mucho mucho tiempo, en una galaxia muy muy lejana —

(Risas)

02:32

había dos agujeros negros que estaban girando uno alrededor del otro, “bailando un tango”, me gusta decir, que empezó lento, pero a medida que emitían ondas gravitacionales, se iban acercando, se iban acelerando, hasta que, cuando estaban girando casi a la velocidad de la luz, se fusionaron en un solo agujero negro que tenía 60 veces la masa del sol pero compactada en 360 kilómetros. Eso es el tamaño del estado de Louisiana, donde yo vivo. Este efecto increíble produjo ondas gravitacionales que llevaron el mensaje de este abrazo cósmico al resto del universo.

03:21

Nos tomó mucho tiempo descubrir el efecto de estas ondas gravitacionales, porque lo que hacen, la manera en que las medimos, es buscando efectos en distancias. Nosotros queremos medir longitudes, distancias. Cuando estas ondas gravitacionales pasaron por la Tierra, que pasaron en el 2015, produjeron cambios en todas las distancias las distancias entre ustedes, las distancias entre ustedes y yo, nuestras alturas — todos nosotros nos estiramos y nos achicamos un poquitito. La predicción es que el efecto es proporcional a la distancia. Pero es pequeñísimo: aun para distancias mucho más grandes que mi poca altura, el efecto es infinitesimal. Por ejemplo, la distancia entre la Tierra y el Sol cambió por un diámetro atómico. ¿Cómo se puede medir eso? ¿Cómo pudimos medir eso?

04:28

Hace unos cincuenta años, había unos físicos visionarios en Caltech y MIT, Kip Thorne, Ron Drever, Rai Weiss, que pensaban que se podían medir precisamente distancias usando láseres que midieran distancias entre espejos que estaban a kilómetros de distancia. Tomó muchos años y mucho trabajo y muchos científicos desarrollar la tecnología, desarrollar las ideas, y 20 años después, hace casi 30 años, más de 20, se empezaron a construir dos detectores de ondas gravitacionales, dos interferómetros, en los Estados Unidos, cada uno con cuatro kilómetros de largo. Uno [está] en el estado de Louisiana, en Livingston, Louisiana, en medio de un bosque precioso; el otro, en Hanford, Washington, el estado de Washington, en medio del desierto.

05:29

En estos interferómetros, tenemos láseres que viajan desde el centro, cuatro kilómetros en vacío, se reflejan en espejos y vuelven, y estamos midiendo la diferencia de distancia entre este brazo y este brazo. Y estos detectores son muy muy muy sensibles, son los instrumentos más precisos del mundo. ¿Por qué hicimos dos? Porque las señales que queremos medir vienen del espacio son las que queremos medir, pero los espejos se están moviendo todo el tiempo, entonces para distinguir efectos ondas gravitacionales, que son efectos astrofísicos y deben aparecer en los dos detectores, podemos distinguirlos de los efectos locales, que aparecen distintos, en uno o en el otro.

06:19

En septiembre del 2015, estábamos terminando de instalar la segunda generación de tecnología en estos detectores, y todavía no estábamos a la sensibilidad óptima que queremos — todavía no estamos allí, incluso dos años después, pero ya queríamos tomar datos. No pensábamos que íbamos a ver nada, pero estábamos preparando para empezar a tomar datos por unos meses. Y la naturaleza nos sorprendió.

06:49

El 14 de septiembre del 2015, vimos en los dos detectores una onda gravitacional. En los dos detectores vimos una señal con unos ciclos que crecían en amplitud de frecuencia después decaían, y eran los mismos en los dos detectores. Eran ondas gravitacionales. Y no solo eso, sino que, descodificando esta forma de onda, podíamos deducir que venían de agujeros negros fusionándose en uno solo, hace más de mil millones de años. Y esto fue —

(Aplausos)

 

Esto fue fantástico.

07:39

Al principio, no lo podíamos creer. Esto no se suponía que tenía que pasar hasta más adelante. Fue una sorpresa para todos. Nos tomó meses convencernos de que esto era cierto, porque no queríamos dar lugar a ningún error. Pero era cierto, y para despejar toda duda de que realmente los detectores podían medir estas cosas, en diciembre del mismo año, medimos otra onda gravitacional más chiquita que la primera. La primera onda gravitacional produjo una diferencia de distancia de cuatro milésimas de protón. sobre cuatro kilómetros. Sí, la segunda detección fue más chica pero todavía muy convincente para nuestros estándares A pesar de que estas son ondas de espacio-tiempo, no ondas de sonido, a nosotros nos gusta ponerlas en parlantes y escucharlas. Le decimos a esto “la música del universo”. Aquí les quiero hacer escuchar las primeras dos notas de esta música.

(Silbido)

(Silbido)

 

La segunda, la más cortita fue la última fracción de segundo de estos dos agujeros negros, que en esa fracción de segundo emitieron un montón de energía — tanta energía — como la de tres soles convirtiéndose en energía siguiendo esa fórmula famosa, E = mc2. ¿Se acuerdan? Esta música, en realidad, a nosotros nos encanta tanto, bailamos con esto, que se la voy a hacer escuchar de nuevo.

(Silbido)

(Silbido)

¡Es la música del universo!

(Aplausos)

09:35

Frecuentemente la gente me pregunta ahora: ¿Para qué sirven las ondas gravitacionales? Y ahora que ya las descubrieron, ¿qué queda por hacer? ¿Para qué sirven las ondas gravitacionales?

09:50

Cuando a Borges le preguntaron: “¿Para qué sirve la poesía?” Él a su vez preguntó: “¿Para qué sirve el amanecer? ¿Para qué sirven las caricias? ¿Para qué sirve el olor a café?” Y él se respondió: “La poesía sirve para el placer, para la emoción, para vivir”.

10:11

Y entender el universo, esta curiosidad humana por saber cómo funciona todo es parecido. La humanidad, desde tiempo inmemorial, y todos nosotros, todos ustedes de chicos, cuando se mira el cielo por primera vez y se ven estrellas, uno se pregunta: “¿Qué son las estrellas?” Esa curiosidad es lo que nos hace humanos. Y eso es lo que hacemos con la ciencia.

10:39

A nosotros nos gusta decir que las ondas gravitacionales ya están sirviendo, porque estamos abriendo una nueva manera de explorar el universo. Hasta ahora, pudimos ver la luz de las estrellas a través de las ondas electromagnéticas. Ahora podemos escuchar el sonido del universo aun de cosas que no emiten luz, como ondas gravitacionales.

(Aplausos)

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

Pero ¿solo para eso servirán? ¿No se deriva ninguna tecnología de ondas gravitacionales?

11:21

A lo mejor, sí. Pero va probablemente a tomar mucho tiempo. Hemos desarrollado tecnología para detectarlas, pero las ondas mismas, a lo mejor se descubra de acá a cien años que sirven para algo. Pero toma mucho tiempo derivar tecnología de la ciencia y no es por eso que lo hacemos. Toda tecnología se deriva de la ciencia, pero la ciencia la hacemos para el placer. ¿Qué nos queda por hacer? Muchísimo. Muchísimo. Esto es recién el comienzo.

11:54

A medida que hacemos los detectores más sensibles — y nos queda bastante por hacer — no solo vamos a ver más agujeros negros, vamos a poder hacer un catálogo para saber cuántos hay, dónde están cuán grandes son, sino que también, vamos a ver otros objetos. Vamos a ver la fusión de estrellas de neutrones, que se convierten en un agujero negro. Vamos a ver nacer a un agujero negro. Vamos a poder ver estrellas rotantes en nuestra galaxia produciendo ondas sinusoidales. Vamos a poder ver explosiones de supernovas en nuestra galaxia. Es todo un espectro de nuevas fuentes que vamos a estar viendo.

12:35

Nos gusta decir que hemos agregado un nuevo sentido al cuerpo humano: ahora, además de ver, podemos escuchar. Esto es una revolución en la astronomía, así como cuando Galileo inventó el telescopio, o como cuando al cine mudo se le agregó el sonido. Esto es apenas el comienzo. Nos gusta pensar que el camino de la ciencia es muy largo — muy divertido, pero muy largo — y esta gran comunidad internacional de científicos trabajando en equipo desde muchos países, todos juntos, estamos ayudando a construir este camino, poniendo luces, a veces encontrando desvíos, y construyendo, a lo mejor, una autopista al universo.

Gracias.

(Aplausos)

A little over 100 years ago, in 1915, Einstein published his theory of general relativity, which is sort of a strange name, but it’s a theory that explains gravity. It states that mass — all matter, the planets — attracts mass, not because of an instantaneous force, as Newton claimed, but because all matter — all of us, all the planets — wrinkles the flexible fabric of space-time.

00:45

Space-time is this thing in which we live and that connects us all. It’s like when we lie down on a mattress and distort its contour. The masses move — again, not according to Newton’s laws, but because they see this space-time curvature and follow the little curves, just like when our bedmate nestles up to us because of the mattress curvature.

(Laughter)

A year later, in 1916, Einstein derived from his theory that gravitational waves existed, and that these waves were produced when masses move, like, for example, when two stars revolve around one another and create folds in space-time which carry energy from the system, and the stars move toward each other. However, he also estimated that these effects were so minute, that it would never be possible to measure them. I’m going to tell you the story of how, with the work of hundreds of scientists working in many countries over the course of many decades, just recently, in 2015, we discovered those gravitational waves for the first time.

02:15

It’s a rather long story. It started 1.3 billion years ago. A long, long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away —

(Laughter)

02:32

two black holes were revolving around one another — “dancing the tango,” I like to say. It started slowly, but as they emitted gravitational waves, they grew closer together, accelerating in speed, until, when they were revolving at almost the speed of light, they fused into a single black hole that had 60 times the mass of the Sun, but compressed into the space of 360 kilometers. That’s the size of the state of Louisiana, where I live. This incredible effect produced gravitational waves that carried the news of this cosmic hug to the rest of the universe.

03:21

It took us a long time to figure out the effects of these gravitational waves, because the way we measure them is by looking for effects in distances. We want to measure longitudes, distances. When these gravitational waves passed by Earth, which was in 2015, they produced changes in all distances — the distances between all of you, the distances between you and me, our heights — every one of us stretched and shrank a tiny bit. The prediction is that the effect is proportional to the distance. But it’s very small: even for distances much greater than my slight height, the effect is infinitesimal. For example, the distance between the Earth and the Sun changed by one atomic diameter. How can that be measured? How could we measure it?

04:28

Fifty years ago, some visionary physicists at Caltech and MIT — Kip Thorne, Ron Drever, Rai Weiss –thought they could precisely measure distances using lasers that measured distances between mirrors kilometers apart. It took many years, a lot of work and many scientists to develop the technology and develop the ideas. And 20 years later, almost 30 years ago, they started to build two gravitational wave detectors, two interferometers, in the United States. Each one is four kilometers long; one is in Livingston, Louisiana, in the middle of a beautiful forest, and the other is in Hanford, Washington, in the middle of the desert.

05:29

The interferometers have lasers that travel from the center through four kilometers in-vacuum, are reflected in mirrors and then they return. We measure the difference in the distances between this arm and this arm. These detectors are very, very, very sensitive; they’re the most precise instruments in the world. Why did we make two? It’s because the signals that we want to measure come from space, but the mirrors are moving all the time, so in order to distinguish the gravitational wave effects — which are astrophysical effects and should show up on the two detectors — we can distinguish them from the local effects, which appear separately, either on one or the other.

06:19

In September of 2015, we were finishing installing the second-generation technology in the detectors, and we still weren’t at the optimal sensitivity that we wanted — we’re still not, even now, two years later — but we wanted to gather data. We didn’t think we’d see anything, but we were getting ready to start collecting a few months’ worth of data. And then nature surprised us.

06:49

On September 14, 2015, we saw, in both detectors, a gravitational wave. In both detectors, we saw a signal with cycles that increased in amplitude and frequency and then go back down. And they were the same in both detectors. They were gravitational waves. And not only that — in decoding this type of wave, we were able to deduce that they came from black holes fusing together to make one, more than a billion years ago. And that was —

(Applause)

that was fantastic.

07:39

At first, we couldn’t believe it. We didn’t imagine this would happen until much later; it was a surprise for all of us. It took us months to convince ourselves that it was true, because we didn’t want to leave any room for error. But it was true, and to clear up any doubt that the detectors really could measure these things, in December of that same year, we measured another gravitational wave, smaller than the first one. The first gravitational wave produced a difference in the distance of four-thousandths of a proton over four kilometers. Yes, the second detection was smaller, but still very convincing by our standards. Despite the fact that these are space-time waves and not sound waves, we like to put them into loudspeakers and listen to them. We call this “the music of the universe.” I’d like you to listen to the first two notes of that music.

(Chirping sound)

(Chirping sound)

The second, shorter sound was the last fraction of a second of the two black holes which, in that fraction of a second, emitted vast amounts of energy — so much energy, it was like three Suns converting into energy, following that famous formula, E = mc2. Remember that one? We love this music so much we actually dance to it. I’m going to have you listen again.

(Chirping sound)

(Chirping sound)

It’s the music of the universe!

(Applause)

09:35

People frequently ask me now: “What can gravitational waves be used for? And now that you’ve discovered them, what else is there left to do?” What can gravitational waves be used for?

09:50

When they asked Borges, “What is the purpose of poetry?” he, in turn, answered, “What’s the purpose of dawn? What’s the purpose of caresses? What’s the purpose of the smell of coffee?” He answered,”The purpose of poetry is pleasure; it’s for emotion, it’s for living.”

10:11

And understanding the universe, this human curiosity for knowing how everything works, is similar.Since time immemorial, humanity — all of us, everyone, as kids — when we look up at the sky for the first time and see the stars, we wonder, “What are stars?” That curiosity is what makes us human. And that’s what we do with science.

10:39

We like to say that gravitational waves now have a purpose, because we’re opening up a new way to explore the universe. Until now, we were able to see the light of the stars via electromagnetic waves. Now we can listen to the sound of the universe, even of things that don’t emit light, like gravitational waves.

(Applause)

Thank you.

(Applause)

But are they useful? Can’t we derive any technology from gravitational waves?

11:21

Yes, probably. But it will probably take a lot of time. We’ve developed the technology to detect them,but in terms of the waves themselves, maybe we’ll discover 100 years from now that they are useful.But it takes a lot of time to derive technology from science, and that’s not why we do it. All technology is derived from science, but we practice science for the enjoyment. What’s left to do? A lot. A lot; this is only the beginning.

11:54

As we make the detectors more and more sensitive — and we have lots of work to do there — not only are we going to see more black holes and be able to catalog how many there are, where they are and how big they are, we’ll also be able to see other objects. We’ll see neutron stars fuse and turn into black holes. We’ll see a black holes being born. We’ll be able to see rotating stars in our galaxyproduce sinusoidal waves. We’ll be able to see explosions of supernovas in our galaxy. We’ll be seeing a whole spectrum of new sources.

12:35

We like to say that we’ve added a new sense to the human body: now, in addition to seeing, we’re able to hear. This is a revolution in astronomy, like when Galileo invented the telescope. It’s like when they added sound to silent movies. This is just the beginning. We like to think that the road to science is very long — very fun, but very long — and that we, this large, international community of scientists, working from many countries, together as a team, are helping to build that road; that we’re shedding light — sometimes encountering detours — and building, perhaps, a highway to the universe.

Thank you.

(Applause)

Existing on a knife-edge

dimecres, 26/12/2018

Transcript

 

So last year, on the Fourth of July, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider discovered the Higgs boson. It was a historical day. There’s no doubt that from now on, the Fourth of July will be remembered not as the day of the Declaration of Independence, but as the day of the discovery of the Higgs boson. Well, at least, here at CERN.

00:35

But for me, the biggest surprise of that day was that there was no big surprise. In the eye of a theoretical physicist, the Higgs boson is a clever explanation of how some elementary particles gain mass, but it seems a fairly unsatisfactory and incomplete solution. Too many questions are left unanswered. The Higgs boson does not share the beauty, the symmetry, the elegance, of the rest of the elementary particle world. For this reason, the majority of theoretical physicists believe that the Higgs boson could not be the full story. We were expecting new particles and new phenomena accompanying the Higgs boson. Instead, so far, the measurements coming from the LHC show no signs of new particles or unexpected phenomena.

01:27

Of course, the verdict is not definitive. In 2015, the LHC will almost double the energy of the colliding protons, and these more powerful collisions will allow us to explore further the particle world, and we will certainly learn much more.

01:48

But for the moment, since we have found no evidence for new phenomena, let us suppose that the particles that we know today, including the Higgs boson, are the only elementary particles in nature, even at energies much larger than what we have explored so far. Let’s see where this hypothesis is going to lead us. We will find a surprising and intriguing result about our universe, and to explain my point, let me first tell you what the Higgs is about, and to do so, we have to go back to one tenth of a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. And according to the Higgs theory, at that instant, a dramatic event took place in the universe. Space-time underwent a phase transition. It was something very similar to the phase transition that occurs when water turns into ice below zero degrees. But in our case, the phase transition is not a change in the way the molecules are arranged inside the material, but is about a change of the very fabric of space-time.

03:06

During this phase transition, empty space became filled with a substance that we now call Higgs field.And this substance may seem invisible to us, but it has a physical reality. It surrounds us all the time,just like the air we breathe in this room. And some elementary particles interact with this substance, gaining energy in the process. And this intrinsic energy is what we call the mass of a particle, and by discovering the Higgs boson, the LHC has conclusively proved that this substance is real, because it is the stuff the Higgs bosons are made of. And this, in a nutshell, is the essence of the Higgs story.

03:52

But this story is far more interesting than that. By studying the Higgs theory, theoretical physicists discovered, not through an experiment but with the power of mathematics, that the Higgs field does not necessarily exist only in the form that we observe today. Just like matter can exist as liquid or solid, so the Higgs field, the substance that fills all space-time, could exist in two states. Besides the known Higgs state, there could be a second state in which the Higgs field is billions and billions times denserthan what we observe today, and the mere existence of another state of the Higgs field poses a potential problem. This is because, according to the laws of quantum mechanics, it is possible to have transitions between two states, even in the presence of an energy barrier separating the two states, and the phenomenon is called, quite appropriately, quantum tunneling. Because of quantum tunneling, I could disappear from this room and reappear in the next room, practically penetrating the wall. But don’t expect me to actually perform the trick in front of your eyes, because the probability for me to penetrate the wall is ridiculously small. You would have to wait a really long time before it happens, but believe me, quantum tunneling is a real phenomenon, and it has been observed in many systems. For instance, the tunnel diode, a component used in electronics, works thanks to the wonders of quantum tunneling.

05:46

But let’s go back to the Higgs field. If the ultra-dense Higgs state existed, then, because of quantum tunneling, a bubble of this state could suddenly appear in a certain place of the universe at a certain time, and it is analogous to what happens when you boil water. Bubbles of vapor form inside the water, then they expand, turning liquid into gas. In the same way, a bubble of the ultra-dense Higgs state could come into existence because of quantum tunneling. The bubble would then expand at the speed of light, invading all space, and turning the Higgs field from the familiar state into a new state.

 

06:32

Is this a problem? Yes, it’s a big a problem. We may not realize it in ordinary life, but the intensity of the Higgs field is critical for the structure of matter. If the Higgs field were only a few times more intense, we would see atoms shrinking, neutrons decaying inside atomic nuclei, nuclei disintegrating, and hydrogen would be the only possible chemical element in the universe. And the Higgs field, in the ultra-dense Higgs state, is not just a few times more intense than today, but billions of times, and if space-time were filled by this Higgs state, all atomic matter would collapse. No molecular structures would be possible, no life.

 

07:22

So, I wonder, is it possible that in the future, the Higgs field will undergo a phase transition and, through quantum tunneling, will be transformed into this nasty, ultra-dense state? In other words, I ask myself, what is the fate of the Higgs field in our universe? And the crucial ingredient necessary to answer this question is the Higgs boson mass. And experiments at the LHC found that the mass of the Higgs boson is about 126 GeV. This is tiny when expressed in familiar units, because it’s equal to something like 10 to the minus 22 grams, but it is large in particle physics units, because it is equal to the weight of an entire molecule of a DNA constituent.

 

08:17

So armed with this information from the LHC, together with some colleagues here at CERN, we computed the probability that our universe could quantum tunnel into the ultra-dense Higgs state, and we found a very intriguing result. Our calculations showed that the measured value of the Higgs boson mass is very special. It has just the right value to keep the universe hanging in an unstable situation.The Higgs field is in a wobbly configuration that has lasted so far but that will eventually collapse. So according to these calculations, we are like campers who accidentally set their tent at the edge of a cliff. And eventually, the Higgs field will undergo a phase transition and matter will collapse into itself.

 

09:14

So is this how humanity is going to disappear? I don’t think so. Our calculation shows that quantum tunneling of the Higgs field is not likely to occur in the next 10 to the 100 years, and this is a very long time. It’s even longer than the time it takes for Italy to form a stable government.

(Laughter)

09:40

Even so, we will be long gone by then. In about five billion years, our sun will become a red giant, as large as the Earth’s orbit, and our Earth will be kaput, and in a thousand billion years, if dark energy keeps on fueling space expansion at the present rate, you will not even be able to see as far as your toes, because everything around you expands at a rate faster than the speed of light. So it is really unlikely that we will be around to see the Higgs field collapse.

10:18

But the reason why I am interested in the transition of the Higgs field is because I want to address the question, why is the Higgs boson mass so special? Why is it just right to keep the universe at the edge of a phase transition? Theoretical physicists always ask “why” questions. More than how a phenomenon works, theoretical physicists are always interested in why a phenomenon works in the way it works. We think that this these “why” questions can give us clues about the fundamental principles of nature. And indeed, a possible answer to my question opens up new universes, literally. It has been speculated that our universe is only a bubble in a soapy multiverse made out of a multitude of bubbles, and each bubble is a different universe with different fundamental constants and different physical laws. And in this context, you can only talk about the probability of finding a certain value of the Higgs mass. Then the key to the mystery could lie in the statistical properties of the multiverse. It would be something like what happens with sand dunes on a beach. In principle, you could imagine to find sand dunes of any slope angle in a beach, and yet, the slope angles of sand dunes are typically around 30, 35 degrees. And the reason is simple: because wind builds up the sand, gravity makes it fall. As a result, the vast majority of sand dunes have slope angles around the critical value, near to collapse. And something similar could happen for the Higgs boson mass in the multiverse. In the majority of bubble universes, the Higgs mass could be around the critical value, near to a cosmic collapse of the Higgs field, because of two competing effects, just as in the case of sand.

 

12:32

My story does not have an end, because we still don’t know the end of the story. This is science in progress, and to solve the mystery, we need more data, and hopefully, the LHC will soon add new clues to this story. Just one number, the Higgs boson mass, and yet, out of this number we learn so much. I started from a hypothesis, that the known particles are all there is in the universe, even beyond the domain explored so far. From this, we discovered that the Higgs field that permeates space-time may be standing on a knife edge, ready for cosmic collapse, and we discovered that this may be a hint that our universe is only a grain of sand in a giant beach, the multiverse.

13:33

But I don’t know if my hypothesis is right. That’s how physics works: A single measurement can put us on the road to a new understanding of the universe or it can send us down a blind alley. But whichever it turns out to be, there is one thing I’m sure of: The journey will be full of surprises.

Thank you.       (Applause)

El año pasado, el 4 de julio, experimentos en el Gran Colisionador de Hadrones, GCH, descubrieron el bosón de Higgs. Fue un día histórico. No hay duda de que de ahora en adelante, el 4 de julio será recordado no como el día de la Declaración de Independencia, sino como el día del Descubrimiento del Bosón de Higgs. Bueno, al menos, aquí en el CERN.

Pero para mí, la mayor sorpresa del día fue que no hubo ninguna gran sorpresa. Para el ojo de un físico teórico, el bosón de Higgs es una explicación inteligente de cómo algunas partículas elementales ganan masa; sin embargo, parece una solución bastante insatisfactoria e incompleta. Quedan muchas preguntas sin responder. El bosón de Higgs no comparte la belleza, la simetría, la elegancia, del resto del mundo de las partículas elementales. Por esta razón, la mayoría de los físicos teóricos cree que el bosón de Higgs no puede ser la historia completa. Esperábamos nuevas partículas y fenómenos acompañando al bosón de Higgs. En cambio, hasta ahora, las mediciones procedentes del GCH no muestran signos de nuevas partículas o fenómenos inesperados.

Por supuesto, la sentencia no es definitiva. En el año 2015, el GCH casi doblará la energía de la colisión de protones, y estas colisiones más poderosas permitirán explorar más el mundo de las partículas, y sin duda aprenderemos mucho más.

Pero por el momento, ya que no se ha encontrado evidencia de nuevos fenómenos, esto nos deja suponer que las partículas que conocemos hoy en día, incluyendo el bosón de Higgs, son las únicas partículas elementales en la naturaleza, incluso a energías mucho mayores que las que hemos explorado hasta ahora. Vamos a ver a donde nos llevará esta hipótesis. Nos encontraremos con un resultado sorprendente y fascinante acerca de nuestro universo; y para explicar mi punto, primero les explicaré qué es el Higgs, y para hacerlo, tenemos que retroceder a un diezmilmillonésimo de segundo después del Big Bang. Y según la teoría de Higgs, en ese instante, se produjo un acontecimiento dramático en el universo. El espacio-tiempo experimentó una transición de fase. Fue algo muy similar a la transición de fase que ocurre cuando el agua se convierte en hielo por debajo de los cero grados. Pero en nuestro caso, la transición de fase no es un cambio en la forma como las moléculas se organizan dentro de la materia, sino que se trata de un cambio de la estructura del espacio-tiempo.

 

Durante esta transición de fase, el espacio vacío se llenó de una sustancia que ahora llamamos campo de Higgs. Y esta sustancia puede parecer invisible para nosotros, pero tiene una realidad física. Nos rodea todo el tiempo, al igual que el aire que respiramos en esta habitación. Y algunas partículas elementales interactúan con esta sustancia, obteniendo energía en el proceso. Y esta energía intrínseca es lo que llamamos la masa de una partícula, y al descubrir el bosón de Higgs, el GCH ha demostrado concluyentemente que esta sustancia es real, porque las cosas están constituidas por los bosones de Higgs. Y esto, en pocas palabras, es la esencia de la historia de Higgs.

 

Pero esta historia es mucho más interesante. Mediante el estudio de la teoría de Higgs, físicos teóricos descubrieron, no a través de un experimento sino mediante el poder de las matemáticas, que el campo de Higgs no existe necesariamente solamente en la forma que observamos hoy. Al igual que la materia puede existir como líquido o sólido, el campo de Higgs, la sustancia que llena todo el espacio-tiempo, podría existir en dos estados. Además el estado de Higgs conocido, podría haber adoptado un segundo estado donde el campo de Higgs es miles de millones de veces más denso que lo que observamos hoy en día, y la mera existencia de otro estado del campo de Higgs plantea un problema potencial. Esto es porque, de acuerdo a las leyes de la mecánica cuántica, es posible tener transiciones entre dos estados, incluso en presencia de una barrera de energía que separe los dos estados, un fenómeno llamado, muy apropiadamente, efecto túnel cuántico. Debido al efecto túnel cuántico yo podría desaparecer de esta habitación y aparecer en la habitación de al lado, prácticamente penetrando la pared. Pero no esperen que realice el truco ante sus ojos, porque la probabilidad para mí de atravesar la pared es ridículamente pequeña. Tendrán que esperar mucho tiempo antes de que suceda, pero créanme, el efecto túnel cuántico es un fenómeno real, y se ha observado en muchos sistemas. Por ejemplo, el diodo túnel, un componente usado en electrónica, funciona gracias a las maravillas del efecto túnel cuántico.

 

Pero volvamos al campo de Higgs. Si existiera el estado Higgs ultra denso, entonces, debido al efecto túnel cuántico, una burbuja de este estado podría aparecer de repente en algún lugar del universo en un momento determinado, lo que es análogo a lo que sucede cuando el agua hierve. Las burbujas de vapor se forman dentro del agua, luego se expanden, convirtiendo líquido en gas. De la misma manera, una burbuja del estado Higgs ultra denso podría venir a la existencia por el efecto túnel cuántico. Luego se expandiría la burbuja a la velocidad de la luz, invadiendo todo el espacio y convirtiendo el campo de Higgs del estado familiar al nuevo estado.

 

¿Esto es un problema? Sí, es un gran problema. No puede ocurrirnos en la vida cotidiana, pero la intensidad del campo de Higgs es crítica para la estructura de la materia. Si el campo de Higgs fuera un poco más intenso, veríamos átomos encogiéndose, neutrones decayendo dentro de los núcleos atómicos, los núcleos desintegrándose, y el hidrógeno sería el único elemento químico posible en el universo. El campo de Higgs, en su estado de Higgs ultra denso, no solo es un par de veces más intenso que en la actualidad, sino miles de millones de veces, y si el espacio-tiempo se llenara con ese estado de Higgs, toda la materia atómica colapsaría. No existirían estructuras moleculares, ni vida.

 

Entonces, me pregunto, ¿es posible que en el futuro, el campo de Higgs sufra una transición de fase y, a través del efecto túnel cuántico, se transforme en este estado desagradable, ultra denso? En otras palabras, me pregunto, ¿cuál es el destino del campo de Higgs en nuestro universo? Y el ingrediente crucial necesario para responder a esta pregunta es la masa del bosón de Higgs. Y experimentos en el GCH encontraron que la masa del bosón de Higgs es aproximadamente 126 GeV. Esto es pequeño cuando se expresa en unidades familiares, porque es igual a 10 a la menos 22 gramos. Pero es grande en las unidades de la física de partículas, porque es igual al peso de una molécula entera de un constituyente del ADN.

 

Armados con esta información del GCH, junto con algunos colegas aquí en el CERN, calculamos la probabilidad de que nuestro universo pudiera atravesar el túnel cuántico al estado de Higgs ultra denso, y hemos encontrado un resultado muy interesante. Nuestros cálculos han demostrado que el valor medido de la masa de bosón de Higgs es muy especial. Tiene justo el valor correcto para mantener suspendido al universo en una situación inestable. El campo de Higgs está en una configuración inestable que se ha mantenido hasta ahora pero que finalmente se derrumbará. Así que según estos cálculos, somos como los campistas que accidentalmente ponen su tienda en el borde de un precipicio. Y finalmente, el campo de Higgs experimentará una transición de fase y la materia se derrumbará en sí misma.

 

¿Así es cómo la humanidad va a desaparecer? No lo creo. Nuestro cálculo muestra que ese efecto túnel cuántico del campo de Higgs no es probable que se produzca en los próximos 10 a la 100 años y eso es mucho tiempo. Es incluso más que el tiempo que tarda Italia en formar un gobierno estable.

(Risas)

 

Aún así, para entonces ya nos habremos ido hace tiempo. En unos 5 mil millones de años, nuestro Sol se convertirá en una gigante roja, tan grande como la órbita de la Tierra, y nuestra Tierra será “kaput”, y en un billón de años, si la energía oscura sigue impulsando la expansión del espacio al ritmo actual, ni siquiera podrán ver más allá de sus pies, porque todo a su alrededor se expandirá a un ritmo más rápido que la velocidad de la luz. Así que es muy poco probable que estemos por allí para ver el colapso del campo de Higgs.

 

Pero la razón para interesarme en la transición del campo de Higgs es porque quiero abordar la cuestión, ¿por qué es la masa del bosón de Higgs tan especial? ¿Por qué es justo la correcta para mantener el universo en el borde de una transición de fase? Los físicos teóricos siempre preguntan “por qué”. Mucho más que “cómo” funciona un fenómeno, los físicos teóricos siempre están interesados en “por qué” un fenómeno funciona de la manera que funciona. Creemos que estas preguntas de “por qué” nos pueden dar pistas acerca de los principios fundamentales de la naturaleza. Y en efecto, una posible respuesta a mi pregunta abre nuevos universos, literalmente. Se ha especulado que nuestro universo es solo una burbuja en un multiverso jabonoso hecho de una multitud de burbujas, y cada burbuja es un universo diferente con diferentes constantes fundamentales y diferentes leyes físicas. Y en este contexto, solo se puede hablar de la probabilidad de encontrar un determinado valor de la masa de Higgs. Entonces la clave del misterio podría residir en las propiedades estadísticas del multiverso. Sería algo parecido a lo que sucede con las dunas de arena en una playa. En principio, uno podría imaginar encontrar dunas de arena con cualquier ángulo de pendiente en una playa, y sin embargo, los ángulos de inclinación de las dunas de arena típicamente miden alrededor de 30, 35 grados. Y la razón es simple: el viento acumula la arena y la gravedad la hace caer. Como resultado, la mayoría de las dunas de arena tienen ángulos de inclinación alrededor del valor crítico, cerca del colapso. Y algo similar podría suceder para la masa del bosón de Higgs en el multiverso. En la mayoría de los universos burbuja, la masa de Higgs podría estar alrededor del valor crítico, cerca de un colapso cósmico del campo de Higgs, debido a dos efectos en competencia, igual que en el caso de la arena.

Mi historia no tiene un fin, porque aún no sabemos el final de la historia. Esto es ciencia en progreso, y para resolver el misterio, necesitamos más datos, y espero que el GCH pronto añada nuevas pistas a esta historia. Solo un número, la masa del bosón de Higgs, y sin embargo, de este número aprendemos mucho. Yo empecé desde una hipótesis, que las partículas conocidas son todo lo que hay en el universo, incluso más allá del dominio explorado hasta ahora. De esto, descubrimos que el campo de Higgs que impregna el espacio-tiempo puede estar permanentemente al filo de la navaja, listo para el colapso cósmico, y descubrimos que esta puede ser una pista de que nuestro universo es solo un grano de arena en una playa gigante, el multiverso.

Pero no sé si mi hipótesis es correcta. Así es como funciona la física: una sola medición puede ponernos en el camino a una nueva comprensión del universo o nos puede enviar a un callejón sin salida. Pero en cualquier caso de una cosa estoy seguro: El viaje estará lleno de sorpresas.

Gracias.
(Aplausos)

Astronomer Tabetha Boyajian

dijous, 6/12/2018

TED  | February 2016

 

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evi-dence, and it is my job, my responsibility, as an astronomer to remind people that alien hypotheses should always be a last resort.Now, I want to tell you a story about that. It involves data from a NASA mission, ordinary people and one of the most ex-traordinary stars in our galaxy.
00:41
It began in 2009 with the launch of NASA’s Kepler mission. Kepler’s main scientific objective was to find planets outside of our solar system. It did this by staring at a single field in the sky, this one, with all the tiny boxes. And in this one field, it monitored the brightness of over 150,000 stars continuously for four years, taking a data point every 30 minutes. It was looking for what astronomers call a transit. This is when the planet’s orbit is aligned in our line of sight, just so that the planet crosses in front of a star. And when this happens, it blocks out a tiny bit of starlight, which you can see as a dip in this curve.
And so the team at NASA had developed very sophisticated computers to search for transits in all the Kepler data.At the same time of the first data release, astronomers at Yale were wondering an interesting thing:What if computers missed something?
01:53
And so we launched the citizen science project called Planet Hunters to have people look at the same data. The human brain has an amazing ability for pattern recognition, sometimes even better than a computer. However, there was a lot of skepticism around this. My colleague, Debra Fischer, founder of the Planet Hunters project, said that people at the time were saying, “You’re crazy. There’s no way that a computer will miss a signal.” And so it was on, the classic human versus machine gamble. And if we found one planet, we would be thrilled. When I joined the team four years ago, we had already found a couple. And today, with the help of over 300,000 science enthusiasts, we have found dozens, and we’ve also found one of the most mysterious stars in our galaxy.

02:45
So to understand this, let me show you what a normal transit in Kepler data looks like. On this graph on the left-hand side you have the amount of light, and on the bottom is time. The white line is light just from the star, what astronomers call a light curve. Now, when a planet transits a star, it blocks out a little bit of this light, and the depth of this transit reflects the size of the object itself. And so, for example, let’s take Jupiter. Planets don’t get much bigger than Jupiter. Jupiter will make a one percent drop in a star’s brightness. Earth, on the other hand, is 11 times smaller than Jupiter, and the signal is barely visible in the data.

03:26
So back to our mystery. A few years ago, Planet Hunters were sifting through data looking for transits, and they spotted a mysterious signal coming from the star KIC 8462852. The observations in May of 2009 were the first they spotted, and they started talking about this in the discussion forums.They said and object like Jupiter would make a drop like this in the star’s light, but they were also saying it was giant. You see, transits normally only last for a few hours, and this one lasted for almost a week.

04:01
They were also saying that it looks asymmetric, meaning that instead of the clean, U-shaped dip that we saw with Jupiter, it had this strange slope that you can see on the left side. This seemed to indicatethat whatever was getting in the way and blocking the starlight was not circular like a planet. There are few more dips that happened, but for a couple of years, it was pretty quiet.

04:26
And then in March of 2011, we see this. The star’s light drops by a whole 15 percent, and this is huge compared to a planet, which would only make a one percent drop. We described this feature as both smooth and clean. It also is asymmetric, having a gradual dimming that lasts almost a week, and then it snaps right back up to normal in just a matter of days.

04:52
And again, after this, not much happens until February of 2013. Things start to get really crazy. There is a huge complex of dips in the light curve that appear, and they last for like a hundred days, all the way up into the Kepler mission’s end. These dips have variable shapes. Some are very sharp, and some are broad, and they also have variable durations. Some last just for a day or two, and some for more than a week. And there’s also up and down trends within some of these dips, almost like several independent events were superimposed on top of each other. And at this time, this star drops in its brightness over 20 percent. This means that whatever is blocking its light has an area of over 1,000 times the area of our planet Earth.

05:46
This is truly remarkable. And so the citizen scientists, when they saw this, they notified the science team that they found something weird enough that it might be worth following up. And so when the science team looked at it, we’re like, “Yeah, there’s probably just something wrong with the data.” But we looked really, really, really hard, and the data were good. And so what was happening had to be astrophysical, meaning that something in space was getting in the way and blocking starlight. And so at this point, we set out to learn everything we could about the star to see if we could find any clues to what was going on. And the citizen scientists who helped us in this discovery, they joined along for the ride watching science in action firsthand.

06:37
First, somebody said, you know, what if this star was very young and it still had the cloud of material it was born from surrounding it. And then somebody else said, well, what if the star had already formed planets, and two of these planets had collided, similar to the Earth-Moon forming event. Well, both of these theories could explain part of the data, but the difficulties were that the star showed no signs of being young, and there was no glow from any of the material that was heated up by the star’s light,and you would expect this if the star was young or if there was a collision and a lot of dust was produced. And so somebody else said, well, how about a huge swarm of comets that are passing by this star in a very elliptical orbit? Well, it ends up that this is actually consistent with our observations.But I agree, it does feel a little contrived. You see, it would take hundreds of comets to reproduce what we’re observing. And these are only the comets that happen to pass between us and the star. And so in reality, we’re talking thousands to tens of thousands of comets. But of all the bad ideas we had, this one was the best. And so we went ahead and published our findings.

08:00

Now, let me tell you, this was one of the hardest papers I ever wrote. Scientists are meant to publish results, and this situation was far from that. And so we decided to give it a catchy title, and we called it: “Where’s The Flux?” I will let you work out the acronym.

(Laughter)

08:22
So this isn’t the end of the story. Around the same time I was writing this paper, I met with a colleague of mine, Jason Wright, and he was also writing a paper on Kepler data. And he was saying that with Kepler’s extreme precision, it could actually detect alien megastructures around stars, but it didn’t. And then I showed him this weird data that our citizen scientists had found, and he said to me, “Aw crap, Tabby. Now I have to rewrite my paper.”

08:54
So yes, the natural explanations were weak, and we were curious now. So we had to find a way to rule out aliens. So together, we convinced a colleague of ours who works on SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, that this would be an extraordinary target to pursue. We wrote a proposal to observe the star with the world’s largest radio telescope at the Green Bank Observatory.

09:21

A couple months later, news of this proposal got leaked to the press and now there are thousands of articles, over 10,000 articles, on this star alone. And if you search Google Images, this is what you’ll find.

09:39

Now, you may be wondering, OK, Tabby, well, how do aliens actually explain this light curve? OK, well, imagine a civilization that’s much more advanced than our own. In this hypothetical circumstance, this civilization would have exhausted the energy supply of their home planet, so where could they get more energy? Well, they have a host star just like we have a sun, and so if they were able to capture more energy from this star, then that would solve their energy needs. So they would go and build huge structures. These giant megastructures, like ginormous solar panels, are called Dyson spheres.

10:22

This image above are lots of artists’ impressions of Dyson spheres. It’s really hard to provide perspective on the vastness of these things, but you can think of it this way. The Earth-Moon distance is a quarter of a million miles. The simplest element on one of these structures is 100 times that size. They’re enormous. And now imagine one of these structures in motion around a star. You can see how it would produce anomalies in the data such as uneven, unnatural looking dips.

10:58

But it remains that even alien megastructures cannot defy the laws of physics. You see, anything that uses a lot of energy is going to produce heat, and we don’t observe this. But it could be something as simple as they’re just reradiating it away in another direction, just not at Earth.

11:23

Another idea that’s one of my personal favorites is that we had just witnessed an interplanetary space battle and the catastrophic destruction of a planet. Now, I admit that this would produce a lot of dustthat we don’t observe. But if we’re already invoking aliens in this explanation, then who is to say they didn’t efficiently clean up all this mess for recycling purposes?

(Laughter)

11:50

You can see how this quickly captures your imagination.

Well, there you have it. We’re in a situation that could unfold to be a natural phenomenon we don’t understand or an alien technology we don’t understand. Personally, as a scientist, my money is on the natural explanation. But don’t get me wrong, I do think it would be awesome to find aliens. Either way, there is something new and really interesting to discover.

12:24

So what happens next? We need to continue to observe this star to learn more about what’s happening. But professional astronomers, like me, we have limited resources for this kind of thing, and Kepler is on to a different mission.

12:39

And I’m happy to say that once again, citizen scientists have come in and saved the day. You see, this time, amateur astronomers with their backyard telescopes stepped up immediately and started observing this star nightly at their own facilities, and I am so excited to see what they find.

13:03

What’s amazing to me is that this star would have never been found by computers because we just weren’t looking for something like this. And what’s more exciting is that there’s more data to come.There are new missions that are coming up that are observing millions more stars all over the sky.

And just think: What will it mean when we find another star like this? And what will it mean if we don’t find another star like this?

Thank you.

(Applause)

Las afirmaciones extraordinarias requieren pruebas extraordinarias, y es mi trabajo, mi responsabilidad, como astrónoma, recordar a la gente que las hipótesis extraterrestres siempre deben ser el último recurso. Quiero contar una historia al respecto. Esta incluye datos de una misión de la NASA, gente común y una de las estrellas más extraordinarios en nuestra galaxia.
00:41
Se inició en 2009 con el lanzamiento de la misión Kepler de la NASA. El principal objetivo científico de Kepler era encontrar planetas fuera de nuestro siste-ma solar. Se hizo esto mirando un solo campo en el cielo, este, con todas las pequeñas cajas. Y en este un campo, se supervisó el brillo de más de 150 000 estrellas de forma continua durante cuatro años, teniendo un punto de datos cada 30 minutos.Buscaba aquello que los astrónomos llaman un tránsito. Esto es cuando la órbita del planeta está alineada en nuestra línea de visión, para que el planeta pase por delante de una estrella. Y cuando esto sucede, bloquea un poco de luz de las estrellas, que se puede ver como un baño en esta curva.
Y por eso el equipo de la NASA ha desarrollado equipos muy sofisticados para buscar tránsitos de todos los datos de Kepler.Al mismo tiempo de la primera publicación de los datos, los astrónomos de la Universidad de Yale se preguntaban algo interesante: ¿Qué pasa si las computadoras perdieron algo?
01:52
Por eso se inició el proyecto de ciencia ciudadana llamada cazadores de planetas para incorporar a gente observando los mismos datos. El cerebro humano tiene una capacidad asombrosa para reconocer patrones, a veces incluso mejor que una computadora. Sin embargo, había mucho escepticismo al respecto. Mi colega, Debra Fischer, fundadora del proyecto Planet Hunters, dijo que la gente entonces decía: “Están locos. No es posible que una computadora pierda una señal. Y así continuó el clásico juego de azar humano contra la máquina. Y si encontramos un planeta, estaríamos encantados. Cuando me uní al equipo hace cuatro años, ya habíamos encontrado una pareja. Y hoy, con la ayuda de más de 300 000 entusiastas de la ciencia, hemos encontrado docenas, y también hemos encontrado una de las estrellas más misteriosas en nuestra galaxia.
02:45
Así que para entender esto, les enseñaré cómo es un tránsito normal en los datos de Kepler. En este gráfico en el lado izquierdo representa la cantidad de luz, y en el fondo es el tiempo. La línea blanca es la luz solo de la estrella, lo que los astrónomos llaman una curva de luz. Al transitar un planeta por una estrella, bloquea un poco de esta luz, y la profundidad de este tránsito refleja el tamaño del objeto en sí. Y así, por ejemplo, tomemos Júpiter. Los planetas no llegan a ser mucho más grandes que Júpiter. Júpiter disminuiria del 1 % el brillo de una estrella. La Tierra, por otra parte, es 11 veces más pequeña que Júpiter, y la señal es apenas visible en los datos.

03:26
Así que de vuelta a nuestro misterio. Hace unos años los cazadores de planetas depurando datos en busca de tránsitos, vieron a una misteriosa señal procedente de la estrella KIC 8462852. Las observaciones en ma-yo de 2009 fueron las primeras, y empezaron a hablar de esto en los foros de discusión.Decían que un objeto igual que Júpiter haría una caída como esta a la luz de la estrella, pero también se decía que era gigan-te. Los tránsitos normalmente solo duran unas pocas horas, y este se prolongó durante casi una semana.04:01
También decían que se ve asimétrica, que significa que en vez de limpieza por inmersión en forma de U como en Júpiter, tenía esta extraña pendiente que se puede ver en el lado izquierdo. Esto parecía indicar que todo lo que estaba en el camino y que bloqueaba la luz de las estrellas no era circular como un planeta. Surgieron unas cuantas lagunas, pero hace un par de años, todo estaba bastante tranquilo.

04:26
Y luego, en marzo del 2011, vemos esto: gotas de luz de la estrella caen en un 15 %, y esto es enorme en comparación con un planeta, que solo haría un descenso del 1 %. Hemos descrito esta caracterís-tica como algo suave y limpio. También es asi-métrica, con una atenuación gradual que dura casi una semana, y que luego vuelve a encajarse con normalidad en solo cuestión de días.

04:52
Y de nuevo, después de esto, no sucede gran cosa hasta febrero de 2013. Las cosas empiezan a ser realmente de locos. Hay un enorme complejo de pequeñas caídas en la curva de luz que aparecen, y duran unos 100 días, todo el tiempo hasta el final de la misión Kepler. Estas caídas tienen formas diversas. Algunas son muy afiladas, y otras son anchas, y también tienen duraciones variables. Algunas duran solo un día o dos, otras más de una semana. Y también hay tendencias hacia arriba y abajo en algunas de estas caídas, como si superpusieran varios eventos independientes. Y en este momento, esta estrella cae en su brillo más del 20 %. Esto significa que todo lo que bloquea su luztiene una superficie de más de 1000 veces la superficie de nuestro planeta Tierra.

05:46
Esto es verdaderamente notable. Y por lo que los científicos voluntarios, al ver esto, notificaron al equipo científico que encontraron algo bastante raro que podría valer la pena hacer un seguimiento. Y así, cuando el equipo científico lo observó, pensamos: “Sí, es probable que haya algo malo con los datos”. Pero nos parecía muy, muy, muy difícil, y los datos eran buenos. Y así lo que estaba pasando tenía que ser astrofísico, lo que significa que algo en el espacio estaba en el camino bloqueando la luz estelar. Y así, en este punto, empezamos a aprender todo lo posible sobre la estrella para poder encontrar pistas sobre lo que estaba ocurriendo. Y los científicos ciudadanos que nos han ayudado en este descubrimiento, se unieron a lo largo del paseo viendo la ciencia en acción en primera persona.

06:37
En primer lugar, alguien dijo: ¿y si esta estrella era muy joven y todavía tenía alrededor la nube de material de la que nace? Y entonces otro dijo: ¿qué pasaría si la estrella tuviera planetas ya formados,y dos de estos planetas hubieran colisionado, similar a la formación de la Tierra-Luna. Pues bien, estas dos teorías podrían explicar parte de los datos, pero las dificultades eran que la estrella no parecía ser joven, y no había resplandor de cualquiera de los materiales que se calentaban por la luz de la estrella, y que se puede esperar, si la estrella era joven o si hubo una colisión y se produjo una gran cantidad de polvo. Y así que alguien más ha dicho, ¿Y si hay un enorme enjambre de cometaspasando por esta estrella en una órbita muy elíptica? Esto realmente es consistente con nuestras observaciones. Pero estoy de acuerdo, parece algo artificial. Se necesitarían cientos de cometas para reproducir lo que observamos. Y estos son solo los cometas que pasan entre nosotros y la estrella. Y así, en realidad, estamos hablando de miles a decenas de miles de cometas. Pero de todas las malas ideas que teníamos, esta fue la mejor. Y así seguimos adelante y publicamos nuestros hallazgos.

08:00

Este fue uno de los artículos más difíciles que he escrito. Se supone que los científicos deben publicar resultados, y esta situación estaba lejos de eso. Por eso decidimos darle un título atractivo, y lo llamamos: “¿Dónde está el flujo?” Voy a dejar que Uds. resuelvan el acrónimo.

(Risas)

08:22
Pero esto no es el final de la historia. Casi al mismo tiempo que yo escribía este artículo, me encontré con un colega mío, Jason Wright, que también estaba escribiendo un artículo sobre datos de Kepler. Y decía que con la extrema precisión de Kepler, podría detectar megaestructuras alienígenas alrededor de las estrellas, pero no fue así. Le mostré los datos que los voluntarios científicos habían encontrado,y me dijo: “Tonterías, Tabby. Ahora tengo que reescribir mi artículo”.

08:54
Así que sí, las explicaciones naturales eran débiles, y ahora teníamos curiosidad. Así que tuvimos que encontrar una manera de descartar alienígenas. Así que juntos, convencimos a un colega nuestro que trabaja en SETI, la búsqueda de inteligencia extraterrestre, que este sería un objetivo extraordinario para perseguir. Escribimos una propuesta para observar la estrella con el mayor radiotelescopio del mundo en el Observatorio de Green Bank.

09:21

Un par de meses más tarde, la noticia de esta propuesta se filtró a la prensa y ahora hay miles de artículos, más de 10 000 artículos sobre esta estrella sola. Y si se busca Google, se encontrará esto.

09:39

Ahora, podrían preguntar: “Bien, Tabby, así ¿cómo se explican los alienígenas esta curva la luz?”Bueno, imaginen una civilización mucho más avanzada que la nuestra. En este caso hipotético, esa civilización habría agotado la energía de su planeta de origen, Entonces, ¿dónde podrían obtener más energía? Ellos tienen una estrella madre al igual que nosotros tenemos el sol, y si fuesen capaces de capturar más energía de esta estrella, entonces eso resolvería sus necesidades energéticas. Así que irían y construirían estructuras enormes. Estos gigantes, megaestructuras como los paneles solares descomunales, se denominan esferas de Dyson.

10:21

Esta imagen de arriba contiene un montón de impresiones artísticas de las esferas de Dyson. Es muy difícil ofrecer una perspectiva sobre la inmensidad de estas cosas, pero se puede pensar de esta manera. La distancia Tierra-Luna es de unos 400 000 km. El elemento más simple en una de estas estructuras es 100 veces ese tamaño. Son enormes. Ahora imaginen una de estas estructuras en movimiento alrededor de una estrella. Se puede ver cómo se produciría anomalías en los datos como, por ejemplo, disminuciones irregulares, poco naturales .

10:58

Pero lo cierto es que incluso las megaestructuras exóticas no pueden desafiar las leyes de la física.Cualquier cosa que usa gran cantidad de energía produce calor, pero eso no observamos. Pero podría ser algo tan simple como que están irradiando en otra dirección, no hacia la Tierra.

11:23

Otra idea que es una de mis favoritas es que hemos sido testigos de una batalla en el espacio interplanetario y de la destrucción catastrófica de un planeta. Ahora, admito que esto produciría una gran cantidad de polvo que no se observa. Pero si invocamos a alienígenas en esta explicación,entonces ¿quién puede decir que no limpiaron eficientemente todo para reciclar?

(Risas)

11:50

Se puede ver cómo esto rápidamente capta su imaginación.

Bueno, ahí lo tienen. Estamos en una situación que podría revelarse como un fenómeno natural que no entendemos o una tecnología alienígena que no entendemos. En lo personal, como científica, voy por la explicación natural. Pero no me malinterpreten, creo que sería increíble encontrar extraterrestres. De cualquier manera, siempre hay algo nuevo e interesante para descubrir.

12:24

Entonces, ¿qué pasa después? Tenemos que seguir observando esta estrella para aprender más sobre lo que pasa. Pero los astrónomos profesionales como yo, tenemos recursos limitados para este tipo de cosas, y Kepler está en una misión diferente.

12:39

Y estoy feliz de decir que, una vez más, los ciudadanos científicos han entrado y salvado el día. En esta ocasión, astrónomos aficionados con sus telescopios caseros intensificaron y comenzaron a observar esta estrella nocturna en sus propias instalaciones, y estoy muy emocionada de ver lo que encuentran.

13:03

Me sorprende que esta estrella nunca fue detec-tada por las computadoras porque simplemente no buscábamos algo así. Y lo que es más emo-cionante es que hay más datos en el futuro. Hay nuevas misiones que están surgiendo que están observando a millones de estrellas por todo el cielo.

Y piensen: ¿Qué significará cuando nos topemos con otra estrella de esta manera? Y ¿qué significa si no encontramos otra estrella de esta manera?

Gracias.
(Aplausos)

New senses for humans

divendres, 16/11/2018

 David Eagleman  | Can we create new senses for humans?

As humans, we can perceive less than a ten-trillionth of all light waves. “Our experience of reality,” says neuroscientist David Eagleman, “is constrained by our biology.” He wants to change that. His research into our brain processes has led him to create new interfaces to take in previously unseen information about the world around us.

We are built out of very small stuff, and we are embedded in a very large cosmos, and the fact is that we are not very good at understanding reality at either of those scales, and that’s because our brains haven’t evolved to understand the world at that scale.
00:32
Instead, we’re trapped on this very thin slice of perception right in the middle. But it gets strange, because even at that slice of reality that we call home, we’re not seeing most of the action that’s going on. So take the colors of our world. This is light waves, electromagnetic radiation that bounces off objects and it hits specialized receptors in the back of our eyes. But we’re not seeing all the waves out there. In fact, what we see is less than a 10 trillionth of what’s out there. So you have radio waves and microwaves and X-rays and gamma rays passing through your body right now and you’re completely unaware of it, because you don’t come with the proper biological receptors for picking it up. There are thousands of cell phone conversations passing through you right now, and you’re utterly blind to it. Now, it’s not that these things are inherently unseeable.
Snakes include some infrared in their reality, and honeybees include ultraviolet in their view of the world, and of course we build machines in the dashboards of our cars to pick up on signals in the radio frequency range, and we built machines in hospitals to pick up on the X-ray range. But you can’t sense any of those by yourself, at least not yet, because you don’t come equipped with the proper sensors.
01:59
Now, what this means is that our experience of reality is constrained by our biology, and that goes against the common sense notion that our eyes and our ears and our fingertips are just picking up the objective reality that’s out there. Instead, our brains are sampling just a little bit of the world.
02:22
Now, across the animal kingdom, different animals pick up on different parts of reality. So in the blind and deaf world of the tick, the important signals are temperature and butyric acid; in the world of the black ghost knifefish, its sensory world is lavishly colored by electrical fields; and for the echolocating bat, its reality is constructed out of air compression waves. That’s the slice of their ecosystem that they can pick up on, and we have a word for this in science. It’s called the umwelt, which is the German word for the surrounding world. Now, presumably, every animal assumes that its umwelt is the entire objective reality out there, because why would you ever stop to imagine that there’s something beyond what we can sense. Instead, what we all do is we accept reality as it’s presented to us.
03:19
Let’s do a consciousness-raiser on this. Imagine that you are a bloodhound dog. Your whole world is about smelling. You’ve got a long snout that has 200 million scent receptors in it, and you have wet nostrils that attract and trap scent molecules, and your nostrils even have slits so you can take big nosefuls of air. Everything is about smell for you. So one day, you stop in your tracks with a revelation. You look at your human owner and you think, “What is it like to have the pitiful, impoverished nose of a human? (Laughter) What is it like when you take a feeble little noseful of air? How can you not know that there’s a cat 100 yards away, or that your neighbor was on this very spot six hours ago?” (Laughter)
04:10
So because we’re humans, we’ve never experienced that world of smell, so we don’t miss it, because we are firmly settled into our umwelt. But the question is, do we have to be stuck there? So as a neuroscientist, I’m interested in the way that technology might expand our umwelt, and how that’s going to change the experience of being human.
04:38
So we already know that we can marry our technology to our biology, because there are hundreds of thousands of people walking around with artificial hearing and artificial vision. So the way this works is, you take a microphone and you digitize the signal, and you put an electrode strip directly into the inner ear. Or, with the retinal implant, you take a camera and you digitize the signal, and then you plug an electrode grid directly into the optic nerve. And as recently as 15 years ago, there were a lot of scientists who thought these technologies wouldn’t work. Why? It’s because these technologies speak the language of Silicon Valley, and it’s not exactly the same dialect as our natural biological sense organs. But the fact is that it works; the brain figures out how to use the signals just fine.
05:31
Now, how do we understand that? Well, here’s the big secret: Your brain is not hearing or seeing any of this. Your brain is locked in a vault of silence and darkness inside your skull. All it ever sees are electrochemical signals that come in along different data cables, and this is all it has to work with, and nothing more. Now, amazingly, the brain is really good at taking in these signals and extracting patterns and assigning meaning, so that it takes this inner cosmos and puts together a story of this, your subjective world.
But here’s the key point: Your brain doesn’t know, and it doesn’t care, where it gets the data from. Whatever information comes in, it just figures out what to do with it. And this is a very efficient kind of machine. It’s essentially a general purpose computing device, and it just takes in everything and figures out what it’s going to do with it, and that, I think, frees up Mother Nature to tinker around with different sorts of input channels.
06:49
So I call this the P.H. model of evolution, and I don’t want to get too technical here, but P.H. stands for Potato Head, and I use this name to emphasize that all these sensors that we know and love, like our eyes and our ears and our fingertips, these are merely peripheral plug-and-play devices: You stick them in, and you’re good to go. The brain figures out what to do with the data that comes in. And when you look across the animal kingdom, you find lots of peripheral devices. So snakes have heat pits with which to detect infrared, and the ghost knifefish has electroreceptors, and the star-nosed mole has this appendage with 22 fingers on it with which it feels around and constructs a 3D model of the world, and many birds have magnetite so they can orient to the magnetic field of the planet. So what this means is that nature doesn’t have to continually redesign the brain. Instead, with the principles of brain operation established, all nature has to worry about is designing new peripherals.
08:01
Okay. So what this means is this: The lesson that surfaces is that there’s nothing really special or fundamental about the biology that we come to the table with. It’s just what we have inherited from a complex road of evolution. But it’s not what we have to stick with, and our best proof of principle of this comes from what’s called sensory substitution. And that refers to feeding information into the brain via unusual sensory channels, and the brain just figures out what to do with it.
08:35
Now, that might sound speculative, but the first paper demonstrating this was published in the journal Nature in 1969. So a scientist named Paul Bach-y-Rita put blind people in a modified dental chair, and he set up a video feed, and he put something in front of the camera, and then you would feel that poked into your back with a grid of solenoids. So if you wiggle a coffee cup in front of the camera, you’re feeling that in your back, and amazingly, blind people got pretty good at being able to determine what was in front of the camera just by feeling it in the small of their back. Now, there have been many modern incarnations of this. The sonic glasses take a video feed right in front of you and turn that into a sonic landscape, so as things move around, and get closer and farther, it sounds like “Bzz, bzz, bzz.” It sounds like a cacophony, but after several weeks, blind people start getting pretty good at understanding what’s in front of them just based on what they’re hearing. And it doesn’t have to be through the ears: this system uses an electrotactile grid on the forehead, so whatever’s in front of the video feed, you’re feeling it on your forehead. Why the forehead? Because you’re not using it for much else.
09:51
The most modern incarnation is called the brainport, and this is a little electrogrid that sits on your tongue, and the video feed gets turned into these little electrotactile signals, and blind people get so good at using this that they can throw a ball into a basket, or they can navigate complex obstacle courses. They can come to see through their tongue. Now, that sounds completely insane, right? But remember, all vision ever is is electrochemical signals coursing around in your brain. Your brain doesn’t know where the signals come from. It just figures out what to do with them.
10:34
So my interest in my lab is sensory substitution for the deaf, and this is a project I’ve undertaken with a graduate student in my lab, Scott Novich, who is spearheading this for his thesis. And here is what we wanted to do: we wanted to make it so that sound from the world gets converted in some way so that a deaf person can understand what is being said. And we wanted to do this, given the power and ubiquity of portable computing, we wanted to make sure that this would run on cell phones and tablets, and also we wanted to make this a wearable, something that you could wear under your clothing. So here’s the concept. So as I’m speaking, my sound is getting captured by the tablet, and then it’s getting mapped onto a vest that’s covered in vibratory motors, just like the motors in your cell phone. So as I’m speaking, the sound is getting translated to a pattern of vibration on the vest. Now, this is not just conceptual: this tablet is transmitting Bluetooth, and I’m wearing the vest right now. So as I’m speaking — (Applause) — the sound is getting translated into dynamic patterns of vibration. I’m feeling the sonic world around me.
12:01
So, we’ve been testing this with deaf people now, and it turns out that after just a little bit of time, people can start feeling, they can start understanding the language of the vest.
12:14
So this is Jonathan. He’s 37 years old. He has a master’s degree. He was born profoundly deaf, which means that there’s a part of his umwelt that’s unavailable to him. So we had Jonathan train with the vest for four days, two hours a day, and here he is on the fifth day.Scott Novich: You.
David Eagleman: So Scott says a word, Jonathan feels it on the vest, and he writes it on the board.
SN: Where. Where.
DE: Jonathan is able to translate this complicated pattern of vibrations into an understanding of what’s being said.
SN: Touch. Touch.
DE: Now, he’s not doing this — (Applause) — Jonathan is not doing this consciously, because the patterns are too complicated, but his brain is starting to unlock the pattern that allows it to figure out what the data mean, and our expectation is that, after wearing this for about three months, he will have a direct perceptual experience of hearing in the same way that when a blind person passes a finger over braille, the meaning comes directly off the page without any conscious intervention at all. Now, this technology has the potential to be a game-changer, because the only other solution for deafness is a cochlear implant, and that requires an invasive surgery. And this can be built for 40 times cheaper than a cochlear implant, which opens up this technology globally, even for the poorest countries.
14:00
Now, we’ve been very encouraged by our results with sensory substitution, but what we’ve been thinking a lot about is sensory addition. How could we use a technology like this to add a completely new kind of sense, to expand the human umvelt? For example, could we feed real-time data from the Internet directly into somebody’s brain, and can they develop a direct perceptual experience?
14:27
So here’s an experiment we’re doing in the lab. A subject is feeling a real-time streaming feed from the Net of data for five seconds. Then, two buttons appear, and he has to make a choice. He doesn’t know what’s going on. He makes a choice, and he gets feedback after one second. Now, here’s the thing: The subject has no idea what all the patterns mean, but we’re seeing if he gets better at figuring out which button to press. He doesn’t know that what we’re feeding is real-time data from the stock market, and he’s making buy and sell decisions. (Laughter) And the feedback is telling him whether he did the right thing or not. And what we’re seeing is, can we expand the human umvelt so that he comes to have, after several weeks, a direct perceptual experience of the economic movements of the planet. So we’ll report on that later to see how well this goes. (Laughter)
Here’s another thing we’re doing: During the talks this morning, we’ve been automatically scraping Twitter for the TED2015 hashtag, and we’ve been doing an automated sentiment analysis, which means, are people using positive words or negative words or neutral? And while this has been going on, I have been feeling this, and so I am plugged in to the aggregate emotion of thousands of people in real time, and that’s a new kind of human experience, because now I can know how everyone’s doing and how much you’re loving this. (Laughter) (Applause) It’s a bigger experience than a human can normally have.
16:11
We’re also expanding the umvelt of pilots. So in this case, the vest is streaming nine different measures from this quadcopter, so pitch and yaw and roll and orientation and heading, and that improves this pilot’s ability to fly it. It’s essentially like he’s extending his skin up there, far away.
16:33
Andl that’s just the beginning. What we’re envisioning is taking a modern cockpit full of gauges and instead of trying to read the whole thing, you feel it. We live in a world of information now, and there is a difference between accessing big data and experiencing it.
16:54
So I think there’s really no end to the possibilities on the horizon for human expansion. Just imagine an astronaut being able to feel the overall health of the International Space Station, or, for that matter, having you feel the invisible states of your own health, like your blood sugar and the state of your microbiome, or having 360-degree vision or seeing in infrared or ultraviolet.
17:23
So the key is this: As we move into the future, we’re going to increasingly be able to choose our own peripheral devices. We no longer have to wait for Mother Nature’s sensory gifts on her timescales, but instead, like any good parent, she’s given us the tools that we need to go out and define our own trajectory. So the question now is, how do you want to go out and experience your universe?Thank you.(Applause)
Chris Anderson: Can you feel it?
DE: Yeah.Actually, this was the first time I felt applause on the vest. It’s nice. It’s like a massage. (Laughter)
CA: Twitter’s going crazy. Twitter’s going mad. So that stock market experiment. This could be the first experiment that secures its funding forevermore, right, if successful?
DE: Well, that’s right, I wouldn’t have to write to NIH anymore.
CA: Well look, just to be skeptical for a minute, I mean, this is amazing, but isn’t most of the evidence so far that sensory substitution works, not necessarily that sensory addition works? I mean, isn’t it possible that the blind person can see through their tongue because the visual cortex is still there, ready to process, and that that is needed as part of it?
18:55
DE: That’s a great question. We actually have no idea what the theoretical limits are of what kind of data the brain can take in. The general story, though, is that it’s extraordinarily flexible. So when a person goes blind, what we used to call their visual cortex gets taken over by other things, by touch, by hearing, by vocabulary. So what that tells us is that the cortex is kind of a one-trick pony. It just runs certain kinds of computations on things. And when we look around at things like braille, for example, people are getting information through bumps on their fingers. So I don’t think we have any reason to think there’s a theoretical limit that we know the edge of.
19:33
CA: If this checks out, you’re going to be deluged. There are so many possible applications for this. Are you ready for this? What are you most excited about, the direction it might go?
DE: I mean, I think there’s a lot of applications here. In terms of beyond sensory substitution, the things I started mentioning about astronauts on the space station, they spend a lot of their time monitoring things, and they could instead just get what’s going on, because what this is really good for is multidimensional data. The key is this: Our visual systems are good at detecting blobs and edges, but they’re really bad at what our world has become, which is screens with lots and lots of data. We have to crawl that with our attentional systems. So this is a way of just feeling the state of something, just like the way you know the state of your body as you’re standing around. So I think heavy machinery, safety, feeling the state of a factory, of your equipment, that’s one place it’ll go right away.
CA: David Eagleman, that was one mind-blowing talk. Thank you very much.
DE: Thank you, Chris.
(Applause)
Estamos hechos de cosas muy pequeñas, e inmersos en un gran cosmos, y no entendemos bien la realidad de ninguna de esas escalas, y eso se debe a que el cerebro no ha evolucionado para entender el mundo en esa escala.
00:32
En cambio estamos atrapados justo en medio de ese delgado  tramo de percepción. Pero es extraño porque incluso en esa porción de realidad que llamamos hogar no vemos gran parte de la acción que ocurre. Veamos los colores del mundo. Se trata de ondas de luz, radiación electromagnética que rebota en los objetos y golpea receptores especializados en la parte posterior de los ojos. Pero no vemos todas las ondas que existen. De hecho, vemos menos de una diez billonésima parte de lo que existe. Hay ondas de radio, microondas rayos X y rayos gamma que atraviesan nuestros cuerpos ahora mismo y no somos conscientes de eso, porque no tenemos los receptores biológicos adecuados para detectarlos. Hay miles de conversaciones de teléfonos móviles y estamos completamente ciegos a eso. Pero no es que estas cosas sean inherentemente invisibles.
Las serpientes perciben rayos infrarrojos las abejas rayos ultravioletas, y, claro, construímos máquinas en los tableros de nuestros autos para capturar señales en el rango de frecuencias de radio, y construímos máquinas en hospitales para capturar rayos X. Pero no los podemos percibir, al menos no todavía, porque no venimos equipados con los sensores adecuados.
01:59
Esto significa que nuestra experiencia de la realidad se ve limitada por nuestra biología, y eso va en contra de la noción del sentido común de que la vista, el oído y el tacto apenas percibe la realidad objetiva circundante. En cambio, el cerebro solo percibe una pequeña parte del mundo.
02:22
Bien, en todo el reino animal, distintos animales perciben diferentes partes de la realidad. Así, en el mundo ciego y sordo de la garrapata, las señales importantes son la temperatura y el ácido butírico; en el mundo del pez cuchillo, su ambiente sensorial es profusamente coloreado por campos eléctricos; y para el murciélago su mundo está compuesto por ondas de aire comprimido. Esa es la parte del ecosistema que pueden captar, y en ciencia tenemos una palabra para esto, es “umwelt“, término alemán para denominar el mundo circundante. Al parecer los animales suponen que su umwelt es toda la realidad objetiva circundante, ya que por qué dejaríamos de imaginar que existe algo más de lo que podemos percibir. En cambio, nosotros aceptamos la realidad tal como se nos presenta.
03:19
Hagamos de esto un despertar de conciencia. Imaginen que somos un perro sabueso. Nuestro mundo gira en torno al olfato. Tenemos un morro largo con 200 millones de receptores olfativos, hocicos húmedos que atraen y atrapan moléculas de olor, y fosas nasales que tienen hendiduras para inspirar grandes cantidades de aire. Todo gira en torno al olfato. Un día tenemos una revelación. Miramos a nuestro dueño humano y pensamos: “¿Cómo debe ser tener esa lamentable nariz humana tan empobrecida? (Risas) ¿Qué se sentirá al inspirar pequeñas y débiles cantidades de aire? ¿Cómo será no saber que hay un gato a 90 m de distancia, o que tu vecino estuvo aquí mismo hace 6 horas?”(Risas)
04:10
Como somos humanos nunca hemos experimentado ese mundo del olfato, por eso no lo añoramos, porque estamos cómodos en nuestro umwelt. Pero la pregunta es, ¿debemos quedar atrapados en él? Como neurólogo, me interesa ver de qué forma la tecnología podría expandir nuestro umwelt, y cómo eso podría cambiar la experiencia de ser humano.
04:38
Ya sabemos que podemos conjugar tecnología y biología porque hay cientos de miles de personas que andan por allí con oído y vista artificiales. Eso funciona así, se pone un micrófono, se digitaliza la señal y se coloca una tira de electrodos directamente en el oído interno. O, con el implante de retina, se coloca una cámara se digitaliza la señal, y luego se enchufa una tira de electrodos directamente en el nervio óptico. Hace apenas 15 años muchos científicos pensaban que estas tecnologías no funcionarían. ¿Por qué? Estas tecnologías hablan la lengua de Silicon Valley, y esta no es exactamente la misma que la de nuestros órganos sensoriales biológicos, pero funcionan. El cerebro se las ingenia para usar las señales.
05:31
¿Cómo podemos entender eso? Este es el gran secreto. El cerebro ni oye, ni ve esto. El cerebro está encerrado en una bóveda en silencio y oscuridad en el cráneo. Solo ve señales electroquímicas que vienen en diferentes cables de datos, solo trabaja con esto, nada más. Sorprendentemente, el cerebro es muy bueno para captar estas señales extraer patrones y darle significado, así, con este cosmos interior, elabora una historia y, de ahí, nuestro mundo subjetivo.
Pero aquí está el secreto. El cerebro ni sabe, ni le importa de dónde vienen los datos. De cualquier información que llega sabe descifrar, qué hacer con ella. Es una máquina muy eficiente. Básicamente se trata de un dispositivo de computación de propósito general, sencillamente recibe todo y se da cuenta qué hacer con eso, y eso, creo yo, libera a la Madre Naturaleza para probar distintos canales de entrada.
06:49
Así que llamo a esto modelo evolutivo PH, no quiero entrar en detalles técnicos, PH significa “Potato Head” y uso este nombre para resaltar que todos estos sensores que conocemos y amamos, como la vista, el oído y el tacto, son solo dispositivos periféricos enchufables: se enchufan y funcionan. El cerebro determina qué hacer con los datos que recibe. Si analizamos el reino animal, encontramos muchos periféricos. Las serpientes tienen hoyos de calor para detectar infrarrojos, y el pez cuchillo tiene electrorreceptores, y el topo de nariz estrellada tiene este apéndice con 22 dedos con los que percibe y construye un modelo 3D del mundo, y muchas aves tienen magnetita para orientarse hacia campo magnético del planeta. Esto significa que la naturaleza no tiene que rediseñar continuamente al cerebro. En cambio, establecidos los principios de la operación del cerebro, la naturaleza solo tiene que diseñar nuevos periféricos.
08:01
Bién, esto significa lo siguiente: La lección que surge es que no hay nada realmente especial o fundamental en la biología que traemos. Es lo que hemos heredado a partir de un complejo camino evolutivo. Pero no tenemos por qué limitarnos a eso, y la mejor prueba de ese principio viene de lo que se llama “sustitución sensorial”. Se refiere a la información de entrada en el cerebro por canales sensoriales inusuales; el cerebro entiende qué hacer con ella.
08:35
Esto puede sonar a especulación, pero el primer trabajo que demuestra esto se publicó en la revista Nature en 1969. Un científico llamado Paul Bach-y-Rita puso ciegos en una silla dentada modificada, configuró un canal de video, y puso algo en frente de la cámara, para luego sentir una señal táctil en la espalda mediante una red de solenoides. Si uno mueve una taza de café frente a la cámara, uno la siente en la espalda, y, sorprendentemente, los ciegos tienen buen desempeño detectando qué hay frente a la cámara mediante vibraciones en la parte baja de la espalda. Ha habido muchas implementaciones modernas de esto. Las gafas sónicas toman un canal de video del frente y lo convierten en un paisaje sonoro, y conforme las cosas se mueven, se acercan y se alejan, hace un sonido “bzz, bzz, bzz”. Suena como una cacofonía, pero después de varias semanas, los ciegos empiezan a entender bastante bien qué tienen enfrente a partir de lo que escuchan. Y no tiene por qué ser por los oídos: este sistema usa una rejilla electrotáctil en la frente, para sentir en la frente lo que esté frente a la entrada de video, ¿Por qué la frente? Porque no se usa para mucho más.
09:51
La implementación más moderna se llama “brainport” y es una rejillita eléctrica ubicada en la lengua, la señal de video se convierte en pequeñas señales electrotáctiles, y los ciegos lo usan tan bien que pueden arrojar pelotas en una cesta, o pueden realizar carreras de obstáculos complejos. Pueden ver con la lengua. ¿Parece de locos, verdad? Pero recuerden que la visión siempre son señales electroquímicas que recorren el cerebro. El cerebro no sabe de dónde vienen las señales. Se da cuenta qué hacer con ellas.
10:34
Por eso el interés de mi laboratorio es la “sustitución sensorial” en sordos, y este es el proyecto que realizamos con un estudiante de posgrado en mi laboratorio, Scott Novich, que encabeza esto en su tesis. Esto es lo que queríamos hacer: queríamos hacerlo convirtiendo el sonido del mundo de alguna forma para que un sordo pudiera entender lo que se dice. Y queríamos hacerlo, dado el poder y ubicuidad de la informática portátil, queríamos asegurarnos de que ejecutase en teléfonos móviles y tabletas, y también queríamos hacerlo portátil, algo que pudiéramos usar debajo de la ropa. Este es el concepto. Conforme hablo, una tableta capta mi sonido, y luego es mapeado en un chaleco cubierto con motores vibratorios, como los motores de sus móviles. Conforme hablo, el sonido se traduce en patrones de vibración en el chaleco. Esto no es solo un concepto: esta tableta transmite vía Bluetooth, y ahora mismo tengo uno de esos chalecos. Conforme hablo… (Aplausos) el sonido se traduce en patrones dinámicos de vibración. Siento el mundo sonoro a mi alrededor.
12:01
Lo hemos estado probando con personas sordas, y resulta que solo un tiempo después, la gente puede empezar a sentir, a entender el lenguaje del chaleco.
12:14
Este es Jonathan. Tiene 37 años. Tiene un título de maestría. Nació con sordera profunda, por eso hay una parte de su umwelt que está fuera de su alcance. Tuvimos que entrenar a Jonathan con el chaleco durante 4 días, 2 horas al día, y aquí está en el quinto día.
Scott Novich: tú.
David Eagleman: Scott dice una palabra, Jonathan la siente en el chaleco, y la escribe en la pizarra.
SN: Dónde. Dónde.
DE: Jonathan puede traducir este complicado patrón de vibraciones en una comprensión de lo que se dice.
SN: Toca. Toca.
DE: Pero no lo está… (Aplausos) Jonathan no lo hace conscientemente, porque los patrones son muy complicados, pero su cerebro está empezando a desbloquear el patrón que le permite averiguar qué significan los datos, y esperamos que en unos 3 meses de usar el chaleco, tenga una experiencia de percepción de escuchar como la que tiene de la lectura un ciego que pasa un dedo sobre texto en braille, el significado viene de inmediato sin intervención consciente en absoluto. Esta tecnología tiene el potencial de un cambio importante, porque la única solución alternativa a la sordera es un implante coclear, que requiere una cirugía invasiva. Construir esto es 40 veces más barato que un implante coclear, permite ofrecer esta tecnología al mundo, incluso a los países más pobres.
14:00
Nos animan mucho los resultados obtenidos con la “sustitución sensorial”, pero hemos estado pensando mucho en la “adición sensorial”. ¿Cómo podríamos usar una tecnología como esta para añadir un nuevo sentido, para ampliar el umvelt humano? Por ejemplo, ¿podríamos ingresar datos en tiempo real de Internet en el cerebro de alguien? Ese alguien ¿puede desarrollar una experiencia perceptiva directa?
14:27
Este es un experimento que hacemos en el laboratorio. Un sujeto siente en tiempo real datos de la Red durante 5 segundos. Luego, aparecen dos botones, y tiene que hacer una elección. No sabe qué está pasando. Hace una elección, y tiene respuesta después de un segundo. Es así: El sujeto no tiene idea del significado de los patrones, pero vemos si mejora en la elección de qué botón presionar. No sabe que los datos que le ingresamos son datos bursátiles en tiempo real, y está decidiendo comprar y vender. (Risas) La respuesta le dice si tomó una buena decisión o no. Estamos viendo si podemos expandir el umwelt humano una experiencia perceptiva directa de los movimientos económicos del planeta. Informaremos de eso más adelante para ver cómo resulta.(Risas)Otra cosa que estamos haciendo: Durante las charlas de la mañana, filtramos automáticamente en Twitter con el hashtag TED2015, e hicimos un análisis automatizado de sentimientos es decir, ¿las personas usaron palabras positivas, negativas o neutras? Y mientras esto sucedía lo he estado sintiendo, estoy enchufado a la emoción consolidada de miles de personas en tiempo real, es un nuevo tipo de experiencia humana, porque ahora puedo saber cómo le va a los oradores y cuánto les gusta esto a Uds. (Risas) (Aplausos) Es una experiencia más grande de la que un ser humano normal puede tener.
16:11
También estamos ampliando el umwelt de los pilotos. En este caso, el chaleco transmite 9 métricas diferentes desde este cuadricóptero, cabeceo, guiñada, giro, orientación y rumbo, y eso mejora la destreza del piloto. Es como si extendiera su piel, a lo lejos.
16:33
Y eso es solo el principio. Estamos previendo tomar una cabina moderna llena de manómetros y en vez de tratar de leer todo eso, sentirlo. Ahora vivimos en un mundo de información, y hay una diferencia entre acceder a grandes volúmenes de datos y experimentarlos.
16:54
Así que creo que en realidad las posibilidades no tienen fin en el horizonte de la expansión humana. Imaginen un astronauta que pueda sentir la salud general de la Estación Espacial Internacional, o, para el caso, que Uds. sientan los estados invisibles de su propia salud, como el nivel de azúcar en sangre y el estado del microbioma, o tener visión de 360º o ver en el infrarrojo o ultravioleta.
17:23
La clave es esta: conforme avanzamos hacia el futuro, cada vez podremos elegir nuestros propios dispositivos periféricos. Ya no tenemos que esperar regalos sensoriales de la Madre Naturaleza en sus escalas de tiempo, pero en su lugar, como buena madre, nos ha dado las herramientas necesarias para hacer nuestro propio camino. Así que la pregunta ahora es: ¿cómo quieren salir a experimentar su univer Gracias. (Aplausos)
Chris Anderson: ¿Puedes sentirlo?
DE: Sí.En realidad, es la primera vez que siento aplausos en el chaleco. Es agradable. Es como un masaje. (Risas)
CA: Twitter se vuelve loco. El experimento del mercado de valores, ¿podría ser el primer experimento que asegure su financiación para siempre, de tener éxito?
DE: Bueno, es cierto, ya no tendría que escribirle al NIH.
CA: Bueno mira, para ser escéptico por un minuto, digo, es asombroso, pero ¿hay evidencia hasta el momento de que funcione la sustitución sensorial, o la adición sensorial? ¿No es posible que el ciego pueda ver por la lengua porque la corteza visual está todavía allí, lista para procesar, y que eso sea una parte necesaria?
18:55
DE: Gran pregunta. En realidad no tenemos ni idea de cuáles son los límites teóricos de los datos que puede asimilar el cerebro. La historia general, sin embargo, es que es extraordinariamente flexible. Cuando una persona queda ciega, lo que llamamos corteza visual es ocupada por el tacto, el oído, el vocabulario. Eso nos dice que la corteza es acotada. Solo hace ciertos tipos de cálculos sobre las cosas. Y si miramos a nuestro alrededor las cosas como el braille, por ejemplo, las personas reciben información mediante golpes en los dedos. No creo que haya razón para pensar que existe un límite teórico, que conozcamos ese límite.
19:33
CA: Si esto se comprueba, estarás abrumado. Hay muchas aplicaciones posibles para esto. ¿Estás listo para esto? ¿Qué es lo que más te entusiasma? ¿Qué se podría lograr?DE: Creo que hay gran cantidad de aplicaciones aquí. En términos de sustitución sensorial del mañana, algo empecé a mencionar de astronautas en la estación espacial, que pasan mucho tiempo controlando cosas y podrían en cambio ver que está pasando, porque esto es bueno para datos multidimensionales. La clave es: nuestros sistemas visuales son buenos detectando manchas y bordes, pero son muy malos para el mundo actual, con pantallas que tienen infinidad de datos. Tenemos que rastrear eso con nuestros sistemas de atención. Esta es una manera de solo sentir el estado de algo, como conocer el estado del cuerpo sobre la marcha. La maquinaria pesada, la seguridad, sentir el estado de una fábrica, de un equipo, hacia allí va en lo inmediato.
CA: David Eagleman, fue una charla alucinante. Muchas gracias.
DE: Gracias, Chris. (Aplausos)

 


David Eagleman (born April 25, 1971) is an American writer and neuroscientist, teaching at Stanford University.




 

 TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) és una societat de responsabilitat limitada estatunidenca que organitza un conjunt de conferències seguint el seu lema ideas worth spreading («idees que val la pena difondre»). La societat és propietat de la fundació sense ànim de lucre Sapling Foundation.